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Atheist God

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About Atheist God

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  • Birthday 05/01/1988
  1. So Fernando is closely ascribed with Baudrillard and is a scholar of the latter, but isn't the way that he's read (the suicide bomber stuff and fluidity of language) seem closer to Derridean deconstruction? the idea that words can mean anything because they have no essence and are open to interpretation
  2. Atheist God

    Inception

    From Wikipedia: "In Inception, Nolan wanted to explore "the idea of people sharing a dream space...That gives you the ability to access somebody's unconscious mind. What would that be used and abused for?"[14] The majority of the film's plot takes place in these interconnected dream worlds. This structure creates a framework where actions in the real or dream worlds ripple across others. The dream is always in a state of production, and shifts across the levels as the characters navigate it.[61] By contrast, the world of The Matrix (1999) is an authoritarian, computer-controlled one, alluding to theories of social control developed by Michel Foucault and Jean Baudrillard. Nolan's world has more in common with the works of Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari.[61]" source: http://sensesofcinema.com/2010/feature-articles/desiring-machines-in-american-cinema-what-inception-tells-us-about-our-experience-of-reality-and-film/
  3. @Pobre I would recommend Fatal Strategies as it covers both of those. spirit of terrorism and mind of terrorism gives a more in depth analysis. @Sam again, it depends on what area of focus you would like to examine. if you just want to know about his theories overall, go chronological. however, I think Passwords (a series of essays that doesnt get mentioned enough) and the gulf war did not take place are his most accessible. I'd also recommend Fatal Strategies as well
  4. So many Jonathan Cooks are you the one who always talks about Heidegger, the one from Baylor, the one who wrote the Boring K, or a combination of the aformentioned, or someone else?
  5. ^bad troll is terrible what college is this out of curiosity?
  6. Yes, I know they ran Spanos and Camus this year, but the TOC is usually when new stuff is broken. I don't see how running the same exact aff made by a college team is necessarily creative. And I wasn't equating misuse with functionality.
  7. I didn't mean to say they were bad - I have no idea of their skills. I meant to comment on their lack of creativity and their (mis)use of the aff.
  8. @JMA It's from 1997. it discusses the "murder of the real" in a detective style. it also focuses on the meaningless of language and how we should play with it. @Pobre it depends on what area of thinking you like about him i.e. object/subject, seduction, hyperreality, language, aesthetics, terrorism
  9. It was pretty popular at the TOC last year. One such team running it was Woodward SS
  10. "We are all hostages, and we are all terrorists. This circuit has replaced that other one of masters and slaves, the dominating and the dominated, the exploiters and the exploited. It is worse than the one it replaces, but at least it liberates us from liberal nostalgia and the ruses of history."
  11. Best work: Symbolic Exchange and Death, Fatal Strategies Favorite/most enjoyable: The Perfect Crime What about you guys?
  12. Because reading Loyola's NDT aff at the TOC and winning one round is good
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