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koslow

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koslow last won the day on April 2 2010

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About koslow

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  • Birthday 11/21/1987
  1. I'm cross-posting this for Fred Robertson. This is an awesome camp, and having taught there three years in a row (plus having gone to camp a couple times in high school, and once in college), this is by far the best deal you'll find in the nation. And the coaching staff is phenomenal, plus we have one of the best if not the best student-teacher ratios in the nation. Some camps have a slightly better "prestige" but only for 2- (or for some camps) 7 or 8 times the price. Also, notice that our instructors aren't first-year-outs. Everyone at the NDI has years of coaching experience and proven success. If I could make the choice right now, this is the camp I'd attend. Here's Fred's message: Coaches and debaters, We hosted 30 policy debaters from several different states last year for our camp at Omaha Westside High School in Nebraska, but this year we appear to have about 10 less while the Public Forum and Lincoln-Douglas camps are both slightly ahead of last year's numbers. We plan on offering a 2:1 staff/student ratio. Here is the staff we still have to offer: Halli Tripe, head debate coach at Winston Churchill H.S. in San Antonio and former NDT debater at Baylor; Jeff Roberts, policy debate coach at George Mason University; Chris Spurlock, NDT "nomad" debater and one of the best critical debaters and coaches in the country; Matt Kenyon, former coach at Sioux Falls Lincoln, where he had two national champion policy teams at NCFL Nationals; Mike Ewald, former coach at Sioux Falls Lincoln, current coach at University of Chicago Lab School; Kirsten Blagg, former top 20 finisher at NFL and student at Marquette University; Tim Royers; new head debate coach at Millard West High School; Dylan Sutton, former 7th place speaker at NFL Nationals and assistant coach at Omaha Westside; David Robinson, policy debate coach at Millard South; Zach Lipmann, assistant debate coach at Millard North; Lana Wang, top 20 finisher at NFL Nationals and student at Columbia University; Yaen Zhang, top 20 at NFL Nationals and Harvard student; and Brian Gonzaba, assistant coach at Omaha Westside. All of those folks will be led by Scott Wike, former head coach at Millard South, who does the best topic lecture in the country; and Dana Christensen, current head coach at Omaha Westside, our host school. As you can see, we don't try to go light on policy staff (in fact, there will other policy debaters who come in to help out voluntarily because the Nebraska debate community cares about teaching and working with policy debaters to make them successful) and plan on always being at 2:1 on staff/student ratio. But we need some more students in order to get to that ratio. Here are the basics you need to know. I will extend registration deadline to July 12, two weeks before camp for policy begins on Friday, July 26. I need at least that much time to work on getting you housing if you are coming to Nebraska from out of state. The cost for 9 days of instruction (check out our schedule by going to www.nebraskadebateinstitute.com) is $600 and that includes meals while at camp, water, and good snacks. Ask anyone who has been to NDI about our food; it is legendary. Prepared fresh every day with love, and we adjust to all dietary needs. In addition, if you are coming in from out of state, you will need to be housed by a parent of a local debater who is attending NDI or by other parents who are friends of the camp. That costs $200 but they will also feed you well. Nebraska folks are quite hospitable. If a few people who have attended NDI would testify a bit about the camp, I'd appreciate that. Staff members or former staff members can also join in. This is a very high quality debate camp, plain and simple. Yes, it's my camp, so I am a bit biased, but most everyone who has been to NDI knows I am not exaggerating at all, and our track record with policy debaters has been particularly strong. Come to NDI! You will love it! www.nebraskadebateinstitute.com Fred Robertson Director, Nebraska Debate Institute
  2. I'm cross-posting this for Fred Robertson. This is an awesome camp, and having taught there three years in a row (plus having gone to camp a couple times in high school, and once in college), this is by far the best deal you'll find in the nation. And the coaching staff is phenomenal, plus we have one of the best if not the best student-teacher ratios in the nation. Some camps have a slightly better "prestige" but only for 2- (or for some camps) 7 or 8 times the price. Also, notice that our instructors aren't first-year-outs. Everyone at the NDI has years of coaching experience and proven success. If I could make the choice right now, this is the camp I'd attend. Here's Fred's message: Coaches and debaters, We hosted 30 policy debaters from several different states last year for our camp at Omaha Westside High School in Nebraska, but this year we appear to have about 10 less while the Public Forum and Lincoln-Douglas camps are both slightly ahead of last year's numbers. We plan on offering a 2:1 staff/student ratio. Here is the staff we still have to offer: Halli Tripe, head debate coach at Winston Churchill H.S. in San Antonio and former NDT debater at Baylor; Jeff Roberts, policy debate coach at George Mason University; Chris Spurlock, NDT "nomad" debater and one of the best critical debaters and coaches in the country; Matt Kenyon, former coach at Sioux Falls Lincoln, where he had two national champion policy teams at NCFL Nationals; Mike Ewald, former coach at Sioux Falls Lincoln, current coach at University of Chicago Lab School; Kirsten Blagg, former top 20 finisher at NFL and student at Marquette University; Tim Royers; new head debate coach at Millard West High School; Dylan Sutton, former 7th place speaker at NFL Nationals and assistant coach at Omaha Westside; David Robinson, policy debate coach at Millard South; Zach Lipmann, assistant debate coach at Millard North; Lana Wang, top 20 finisher at NFL Nationals and student at Columbia University; Yaen Zhang, top 20 at NFL Nationals and Harvard student; and Brian Gonzaba, assistant coach at Omaha Westside. All of those folks will be led by Scott Wike, former head coach at Millard South, who does the best topic lecture in the country; and Dana Christensen, current head coach at Omaha Westside, our host school. As you can see, we don't try to go light on policy staff (in fact, there will other policy debaters who come in to help out voluntarily because the Nebraska debate community cares about teaching and working with policy debaters to make them successful) and plan on always being at 2:1 on staff/student ratio. But we need some more students in order to get to that ratio. Here are the basics you need to know. I will extend registration deadline to July 12, two weeks before camp for policy begins on Friday, July 26. I need at least that much time to work on getting you housing if you are coming to Nebraska from out of state. The cost for 9 days of instruction (check out our schedule by going to www.nebraskadebateinstitute.com) is $600 and that includes meals while at camp, water, and good snacks. Ask anyone who has been to NDI about our food; it is legendary. Prepared fresh every day with love, and we adjust to all dietary needs. In addition, if you are coming in from out of state, you will need to be housed by a parent of a local debater who is attending NDI or by other parents who are friends of the camp. That costs $200 but they will also feed you well. Nebraska folks are quite hospitable. If a few people who have attended NDI would testify a bit about the camp, I'd appreciate that. Staff members or former staff members can also join in. This is a very high quality debate camp, plain and simple. Yes, it's my camp, so I am a bit biased, but most everyone who has been to NDI knows I am not exaggerating at all, and our track record with policy debaters has been particularly strong. Come to NDI! You will love it! www.nebraskadebateinstitute.com Fred Robertson Director, Nebraska Debate Institute
  3. ... And ... If your priorities are like mine, you know what you want: the NDI has been nearly the best 9 days of eating I've ever experienced. EDIT: Oh man ... Your, not you're.
  4. Messed something up trying to edit: As Fred noted, not quite free room and board. I'd still wager there's not a better deal on a camp in the nation.
  5. I've worked at the NDI, and when I was in high school I went to a couple camps (and even a camp - Arizona Debate Institute - in college). I can guarantee: First, NDI has a phenomenal coaching staff. Critique lectures have been given by Ryan Wash, Dana Christenson, Ignatio Evans, Jeff Roberts, Chris Spurlock, and myself (and let's be honest, I'm uninformed about policy debate, but I'm sure the folks on that side are awesome, too). Second, this is THE BEST DEAL that exists in the nation. You could fly out from New York to Nebraska and still save money versus any northeast camp. We can give you badass coaching, and all food, room, and board is included, and I promise it's the best deal you'll find. Period. Feel free to message me. I'll check back daily to respond.
  6. Ya! Why can't we just call a spade a spade? It's just plain intolerant not to let me call people fags, niggers, and bitches. If you try and police my language you'll exclude white males like me, then you'll never hear my racist/sexist/hetero-sexist perspective.
  7. Sorry, in the sober light of day that was clearly an over-reaction. But it was certainly shameless trolling on your part. Someone starts a thread asking for help understanding a particular essay by Baudrillard, and three people chime in to help the person. You're response is "How can anyone possibly believe any of Baudrillard's ideas?" Okay, sorry, end personal digression.
  8. Yes, I do find it convincing. EDIT: Also, read the thread rather than being a douchebag troll of any thread that using the name Baudrillard. I explained very explicitly what Baudrillard means when he talks about the disappearance of "the real" and why it means the opposite of what you (being hideously closeminded and a fundamentalist asshole) seem to think.
  9. EDIT (Won't let me edit that post for some reason): Not wrong, but very misleading in how he explains it.
  10. Wow, that was really cool, I'd never read that first essay before. I'll focus on that one. For the second essay, my advice is just to read Crash by JG Ballard and even watch the movie Crash by David Cronenberg (not to be confused with the movie "Crash" a few years ago about racism). I'll start with your last question, because that's the basis for the answer to the other two. The first order of simulation is simple: it's embodied in the representational arts (whether that's literally art, map-making, tool-making, etc.). The artist tries to recreate an object in the world. You should read Plato' writing on art in The Republic for an explanation of what this really entails. The artist tries to make a copy of something, but it's always an imperfect or degraded copy, the original always remains superior. Baudrillard describes this simulation as "in God's image" based on Plato's idea of the relationship of the world of forms to the material world, and then of the material world to the world of art. So you should really check out The Republic. The second order of simulation corresponds to golden age science fiction, writers like Frank Herbert, Isaac Asimov, etc. We imagine this fantastical world that the writer gets to play with like a god. Like in Dune, where the Atreides control the sole source of "spice" in the galaxy, and manipulate inter-galactic politics. Or Foundations, where this dude creates a mathematics to model the progress of society, and is able to calculate that the galactic government will collapse and calculate the mechanisms to solve humanity. In the first order of simulation, the artist is aspiring to God. The artist is trying to recreate the forms produced by God, and the artist always comes up short. In the second order of simulation, the artist *is* God. In the third order of simulation, God becomes banal, and the artist becomes an engineer. Think about it, you can turn on the TV and on half the channels you're bombarded by dytopian predictions of the end of the world or utopian promises of salvation (for just 3 easy payments of $49.99). For anyone who follows the news, what happens daily in congress? If I am to listen to absolutely everything I've heard, almost without exception, since I saw the schoolhouse rock short "I'm just a bill", it's grand bargains, stalemates, country-shocking deals, filibusters, and corruption. And that is what Baudrillard means by "hyperreality", and why the "real" is disappearing. 99% of what goes in in Congress is invisible to us, we never heard about it, or are even aware it's going on. Instead, we see the 1% that's exceptional. The reality, the everyday business, disappears under the hyperreal, the exceptional and exceptionally moving and exciting. So the God, that's everyone. Every TV producer, news anchor, commentator, etc.: they're all Gods manipulating the world. And at least once a month the country is on the brink of collapse, and our political leaders narrowly avert disaster. That fantasy of golden age science fiction (of the second order of simulation) is our every day reality, has replaced our "real". So that architect of worlds, saving the galaxy, is banal. Instead, simulation becomes about engineering. Think of the state of modern science. Star Trek since (I think) the 60's had this communication system where people could communicate from the surface of a planet to outer space. But a couple years ago my sister spent a couple months in southeast Asia so she bought a satellite phone which could do the same thing. A lot of the creations HG Wells are really available today, etc. And the internet had sped up all of this. No only does the news create these daily science fiction realities, in just a couple of minutes I can look up Egypt and learn about the government transition process, the riots, the pyramids. But that's not Egypt, that's 0.01% of the country. Many Egyptians won't see the effects of governmental change for years. Footage of the riots was only of the one largest riot happening in one city. You can see the few most beautiful pictures of the pyramids, but you never see the pictures showing Cairo just on the other side of them. The space missions used to be about JFK standing in a packed stadium promising we'd get to the moon within 10 years and beat the Russians. It was about "One small step for man, one giant leap for mankind." Today, what do you hear about? The cost of each trip to the International Space Station, developing a pen that can write in zero-gravity, how they dispose of shit, storage space, etc. We've gone from science fiction to science to engineering. Most science fiction today (or 20 years ago, for Baudrillard), outside of Hollywood movies, isn't about saving the galaxy, it's about someone's life and the details of their everyday routines. Okay, that was a lot longer than I intended, so I'm going to try my best to be brief answering the rest of your questions: "current society has surpassed the imaginary making classic obsolete." I think this is accurate, depending on what you mean by "classic". Classic in the sense of classical art, of the first order of simulation, is definitely obsolete. However, if you mean something like the "real", I don't think that's true. Rather, what we have today in science fiction is dirty realism and impressionist writing. And if you've read Philip K. Dick, the author Baudrillard refers to as exemplifying this style, it's realistic to the point of being dull. Like, he'll write about a salacious affair, where the brother walks in on his sister sleeping with someone. But instead of describing that, Dick will spend pages upon pages describing the brother writing up a letter so he can tell the sister's husband, and how he's a fan of old pulp magazines and was going through them to figure out how to write the letter, and ... Applying it to debate: As for impacts, in the book America Baudrillard talks about the anti-nuclear movement, and says "it's better to die in the open air than live in an underground sarcophagus" (a line he stole from Virillio). That passage is a phenomenal impact card. You should also cut the stuff, which appears in a lot of places, about "tyranny of the self" as an impact. There are also arguments all over about how this is what props up neoliberalism, and the aff just gets coopted. But I think you have the link backwards. It's not that the aff tries to turn reality into something imaginary, just the opposite. "Reality" as we generally think about space exploration and international politics, is hyper-real. It's more real than the actual, dull, "reality". And the affirmative just stands up and asserts that we don't even know how real it is. It's even more real than this "more real than real" hyper-reality. In other words, their scenarios about an asteroid strike, nuclear war, etc. are made up. By insisting on their urgency and validity, the affirmative keeps us entranced by this idea that we are gods, saving the world or else killing everyone we know and everyone on the planet. Cutting that article to get actual cards is going to be tough, though. YoungGun's description is very good, just a couple things to add: Reality: In the Gulf War Did Not Take Place, Baudrillard says that the Gulf War didn't happen, it wasn't real. However, he's very explicit that a conflict still occurred, and people even died of it. Simulation still have real, material affects, it is still real, but it's not "true" in that there's no fact you can point to and say "This is the fact of the matter" or "Here's good and here's evil" or even "this is one side and this is the other." I think that's what YoungGun was getting at, just wanted to make that explicit. Nuclear weapons: We cannot use nuclear weapons, *EXCEPT* if we were to actually believe in deterrence. If Russia launched a nuclear weapon at the US, any retaliation would risk hundreds of millions of lives, would result in the decimation of Russia AND the US. There's no way a rational actor would ever retaliate. But, if we actually believe in deterrence as a law, as an axiom, as something that's more real and more true than the actual reality we experience, then our only choice would be to retaliate. It's only when we actually believe in hyper-reality that these catastrophes become thinkable and possible. EDIT: Just about everything JSchroeder wrote was wrong.
  11. Nope, just history books.
  12. During the middle-ages the Catholic Church prohibited usury as a sin. Usury today means charging unreasonably high rates on loans, but back then it meant charging any interest at all. Economically, that's obviously a problem, as a bank that gives loans but doesn't charge interest is always going to fail - even in a perfect world they'd only break even. Thus, in many places Jews were explicitly coerced, and in most of Europe not-so-subtly pressured, into working in banking and continuously "sinning" in the eyes of the Church by what was then considered extorting money. That's the source of stereotypes about greedy Jews, and at Marx's time there may even have been noticeable over-representation of Jews in banking.
  13. The line you're thinking of from Nietzsche is "I do not like those who call everything good and this world the best. Such men I call the omni-satisfied. To chew and swallow everything, that is truly the swine's manner." There's a good card in The Shortest Shadow where Zupancic quotes that passage. You should find it. Edit: He's got it right, I was just quoting from memory.
  14. I was in a similar situation. I hadn't debated a single round of policy in high school, but had some LD experience. You may not be experienced at policy, but you'll find you still start with a leg up, and if you do work you can even be nationally competitive (I personally got to octos of CEDA nationals twice, and went 3-5 and 4-4 at the NDT).
  15. koslow

    Nietzsche aff

    Won't help with some of the arguments to make, but will make the aff a lot better: Check out David Bowie. In particular, "Oh! You Pretty Things" and "Quicksand" from Hunky Dory (then again, I'm partial to that album), but you'll probably find stuff on The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust and Space Oddity as well.
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