Jump to content

afenn

Member
  • Content Count

    43
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

-3 Slipping...

About afenn

  • Rank
    Registered User
  • Birthday 03/09/1991
  1. Results, just got done earlier tonight. 1st. Reddy/Bergen (Rocky Mtn.) 2nd. Carney/Jay (Fort Collins) 1st Alt. Reid/Fenn (Fort Collins)
  2. Oh, its possible, I called him up and spoke to the man. He was no help tho.
  3. Hey all, I'm looking for a contact number/e-mail address for sirimarco. Hit me up if you have it. Thanks.
  4. Sure, we are friends, but not what you seem to suggest...In fact, I really don't know what you are suggesting. Care to elaborate, because, truthfully, I'm kind of confused as to what you mean.
  5. What is this cheapness you speak of? I know nothing of the sort.
  6. Wow. You don't know that I'm your partner?
  7. I posted this in current events, but since it is a DA... By DEB RIECHMANN, Associated Press Writer 2 hours, 47 minutes ago WASHINGTON - President Bush signed legislation on Monday to let America share its nuclear know-how and fuel with India even though New Delhi refuses to sign the Nuclear Non-proliferation Treaty. "By helping India expand its use of safe nuclear energy, this bill lays the foundation for a new strategic partnership between our two nations that will help ease India's demands for fossil fuels and ease pressure on global markets," Bush said in a bill-signing ceremony at the White House. The bill carves out an exemption in U.S. law to allow civilian nuclear trade with India in exchange for Indian safeguards and inspections at its 14 civilian nuclear plants. Eight military plants, however, would remain off-limits to the inspections. The House and Senate had overwhelmingly approved the nuclear cooperation bill, giving Bush a foreign policy victory at a time when the administration is struggling to come up with a new approach to the unpopular war in Iraq Critics worry the agreement could spark a nuclear arms race in Asia by boosting India's atomic arsenal. They also argue that the measure undermines international efforts to prevent states like Iran and North Korea from acquiring nuclear weapons. In Beijing on Monday, North Korea defiantly declared itself a nuclear power at the start of the first full international arms talks since its atomic test in July and threatened to increase its arsenal if its demands were not met. The White House said it was willing to make an exception for India, the world's largest democracy, because it had protected its nuclear technology and not been a proliferator. "India has conducted its civilian nuclear energy program in a safe and responsible way for decades," Bush said. "Now, in return for access to American technology, India has agreed to open its civilian nuclear power program to international inspection." The administration also argued it was a good deal because while India's military plants that work with nuclear material would not be subjected to inspections, there would be international oversight for the civilian program, which has been secret since India entered the nuclear age in 1974. "After 30 years outside the system, India will now operate its civilian nuclear energy program under internationally accepted guidelines and the world is going to be safer as a result," the president said. The Bush administration said the pact deepens ties with a democratic Asia power, but was not designed as a counterweight to the rising power of China. "We don't have a policy that would build up a relationship with India to contain China," Undersecretary of State Nicholas Burns told reporters before the bill signing. Bush said the law would make it possible for India, the world's fifth-largest consumer of energy, to reduce emissions and improve its environment. India, whose demand for electricity is expected to double by 2015, currently produced nearly 70 percent of its electricity by burning coal, which produces air pollution and greenhouse gases. The deal also could be a boon for American companies that have been barred from selling reactors and material to India where the economy has more than doubled in size since 1991. In New Delhi, Prime Minister Manmohan Singh defended the nuclear deal, rejecting strong opposition from critics that it would lead to the dismantling of India's atomic weapons. He said he had some concerns about the legislation, but that they would be dealt with during technical negotiations on an overall U.S.-India cooperation agreement. "The United States has assured us that the bill would enable it to meet its commitments" made in agreements struck in July 2005 and in March by Bush and Singh. Singh said India would not accept new conditions and its nuclear weapons program would not be subject to interference of any kind because the agreement with the United States dealt with civil nuclear cooperation. Earlier, opposition leader L.K. Advani of the Bharatiya Janata Party said India should not accept the U.S. legislation, saying that the deal would prevent India from conducting nuclear tests in the future. India conducted its first nuclear test in 1974 and followed it up with a series of nuclear tests in 1998. "The primary objective is to cap, roll back and ultimately eliminate its (India's) nuclear weapons capability," Advani warned. Before civil nuclear trade can begin, several hurdles remain. American and Indian officials need to work out a separate technical nuclear cooperation agreement, expected to be finished next year. The two countries must now obtain an exception for India in the rules of the Nuclear Suppliers Group, an assembly of nations that export nuclear material. Indian officials must also negotiate a safeguard agreement with the IAEA.
  8. Hello Joel, I welcome you to Fort Collins. It is a shame that you have to go to the Fridge, but that is besides the point. I don't really know why you were warned by your coaches about the mysterious "FoCo" kids. We are fairly normal. The only thing that I can think of is that a couple of seniors last year used a nihilism case when they were out of state last year. Other than that, we run topical cases. There is really nothing to worry about, and I hope you come out for the team this/next year. Our two varsity teams are made up of juniors and one sophomore, so you can debate with kids your own age. I look like a sexy beast, by the way. Jay looks Indian, and the other two look like white males. Alex Fenn P.S. jormarber, the name is Jayasumana. And the other names are Fenn, Carney and Reid, so nothing two weird.
  9. By DEB RIECHMANN, Associated Press Writer 2 hours, 47 minutes ago WASHINGTON - President Bush signed legislation on Monday to let America share its nuclear know-how and fuel with India even though New Delhi refuses to sign the Nuclear Non-proliferation Treaty. "By helping India expand its use of safe nuclear energy, this bill lays the foundation for a new strategic partnership between our two nations that will help ease India's demands for fossil fuels and ease pressure on global markets," Bush said in a bill-signing ceremony at the White House. The bill carves out an exemption in U.S. law to allow civilian nuclear trade with India in exchange for Indian safeguards and inspections at its 14 civilian nuclear plants. Eight military plants, however, would remain off-limits to the inspections. The House and Senate had overwhelmingly approved the nuclear cooperation bill, giving Bush a foreign policy victory at a time when the administration is struggling to come up with a new approach to the unpopular war in Iraq Critics worry the agreement could spark a nuclear arms race in Asia by boosting India's atomic arsenal. They also argue that the measure undermines international efforts to prevent states like Iran and North Korea from acquiring nuclear weapons. In Beijing on Monday, North Korea defiantly declared itself a nuclear power at the start of the first full international arms talks since its atomic test in July and threatened to increase its arsenal if its demands were not met. The White House said it was willing to make an exception for India, the world's largest democracy, because it had protected its nuclear technology and not been a proliferator. "India has conducted its civilian nuclear energy program in a safe and responsible way for decades," Bush said. "Now, in return for access to American technology, India has agreed to open its civilian nuclear power program to international inspection." The administration also argued it was a good deal because while India's military plants that work with nuclear material would not be subjected to inspections, there would be international oversight for the civilian program, which has been secret since India entered the nuclear age in 1974. "After 30 years outside the system, India will now operate its civilian nuclear energy program under internationally accepted guidelines and the world is going to be safer as a result," the president said. The Bush administration said the pact deepens ties with a democratic Asia power, but was not designed as a counterweight to the rising power of China. "We don't have a policy that would build up a relationship with India to contain China," Undersecretary of State Nicholas Burns told reporters before the bill signing. Bush said the law would make it possible for India, the world's fifth-largest consumer of energy, to reduce emissions and improve its environment. India, whose demand for electricity is expected to double by 2015, currently produced nearly 70 percent of its electricity by burning coal, which produces air pollution and greenhouse gases. The deal also could be a boon for American companies that have been barred from selling reactors and material to India where the economy has more than doubled in size since 1991. In New Delhi, Prime Minister Manmohan Singh defended the nuclear deal, rejecting strong opposition from critics that it would lead to the dismantling of India's atomic weapons. He said he had some concerns about the legislation, but that they would be dealt with during technical negotiations on an overall U.S.-India cooperation agreement. "The United States has assured us that the bill would enable it to meet its commitments" made in agreements struck in July 2005 and in March by Bush and Singh. Singh said India would not accept new conditions and its nuclear weapons program would not be subject to interference of any kind because the agreement with the United States dealt with civil nuclear cooperation. Earlier, opposition leader L.K. Advani of the Bharatiya Janata Party said India should not accept the U.S. legislation, saying that the deal would prevent India from conducting nuclear tests in the future. India conducted its first nuclear test in 1974 and followed it up with a series of nuclear tests in 1998. "The primary objective is to cap, roll back and ultimately eliminate its (India's) nuclear weapons capability," Advani warned. Before civil nuclear trade can begin, several hurdles remain. American and Indian officials need to work out a separate technical nuclear cooperation agreement, expected to be finished next year. The two countries must now obtain an exception for India in the rules of the Nuclear Suppliers Group, an assembly of nations that export nuclear material. Indian officials must also negotiate a safeguard agreement with the IAEA.
  10. Bush signs nuclear deal with India http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20061218/ap_on_go_pr_wh/us_india_nuclear that was my favorite DA too
  11. Well, our debate coach makes us give him the trophies, so we can display them, so Alex had to give up his chocolate. It was Hershey's milk chocolate anyway...I wouldn't want that.
  12. Just a quick correction, Alex Reid from FoCo won 1st overall speaks (with a 1-3 record somehow), the kid from Fort Collins that was fourth is Ruwan Jay. Second place went to Will from Denver East, and the rest, I don't know.
  13. Just a quick showing of why this is topical. 1. My plan calls for the creation of an armed forces group called C.E.M.I.N (Central Enforcement Masturbation Intelligence Network). 2. Masturbation is a waste of time, if we stop masturbation, more people will join volunteer organizations due to lack of anything better to do. 3. Without Masturbation, the number of people in our society will increase, leading to a greater number of people in service organizations. I have evidence backing this stuff up. So pretty much, *I think* it's topical. I have to work on managing the file size, so all you people that want it, hold your horses for a bit.
  14. Hi all, I recently put together a irony/ban masturbation aff involving this year's topic (National Service). I think that it is pretty good, and I was wondering if anyone would want it. I'm not all that concerned with evidence trading (Money would be nice), but I just want to see if there is any interest in it. Any takers? afenn
×
×
  • Create New...