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topicality - excludes refugees

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In my 1nc  shell for T - Legal immigration excludes refugees, I'm  using a card from the Mich files that says that legal immigration is distinct from and excludes humanitarian admissions like refugees. However, it doesn't give a definition of legal immigration such as "Legal immigration is admission for legal permanent residence," it just says that legal immigration can't be refugees. Is it okay for that to be the only card in the 1NC shell?

If anybody is wondering, it's the Passel and Fix 94 card from the Michigan camp evidence.

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In my 1nc  shell for T - Legal immigration excludes refugees, I'm  using a card from the Mich files that says that legal immigration is distinct from and excludes humanitarian admissions like refugees. However, it doesn't give a definition of legal immigration such as "Legal immigration is admission for legal permanent residence," it just says that legal immigration can't be refugees. Is it okay for that to be the only card in the 1NC shell?

If anybody is wondering, it's the Passel and Fix 94 card from the Michigan camp evidence.

I mean as long as you don't try to use that same shell for like a visas aff I don't see why you would need other cards for your T shell unless you have a really specific violation

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I mean as long as you don't try to use that same shell for like a visas aff I don't see why you would need other cards for your T shell unless you have a really specific violation

i guess what I'm asking is if the card has to say what the term is, or if it can just say what it isn't.

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You need a card that defines the word or phrase from the resolution.

 

The big thing to remember with T debates is that you're ultimately comparing two different interpretations of the topic (the one the aff justifies and the more limited one you propose), not so much specifically debating the aff.

 

So you have a violation card that refugees are excluded from legal immigration, but it doesnt define the scope of what legal immigration is.

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You need a card that defines the word or phrase from the resolution.

The big thing to remember with T debates is that you're ultimately comparing two different interpretations of the topic (the one the aff justifies and the more limited one you propose), not so much specifically debating the aff.

So you have a violation card that refugees are excluded from legal immigration, but it doesnt define the scope of what legal immigration is.

Oh lmao my mistake yeah you need a word to define legal immigration, the card you’re talking about should be a violation card if im not mistaken

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Interpretation—the Affirmative must reduce restrictions on the ability to intentionally enter the United States for the purpose of permanent residence.

Violation—refugees are distinct from immigrants.
Martinez and Marquez 14
(Michael and Miguel, CNN Reporters, "What's the difference between immigrant and refugee?," 7-16-2014, CNN, https://www.cnn.com/2014/07/15/us/immigrant-refugee-definition/index.html, DOA: 3-12-2018) //Snowball //rhetoric [modified]

The distinction is significant and could determine whether the migrants are subject to deportation to their home country or eligible to remain in the United States under asylum.
What is an immigrant?
An immigrant is someone who chooses to resettle to another country.
The United States has a legal process for that immigrant to seek legal residency and eventually citizenship.
Many immigrants, however, don't have such legal status and are thus undocumented. As such, they are subject to "removal" or deportation from the United States.
There are 11 million undocumented immigrants in the United States -- a problem that has led Democrats and Republicans alike to declare the U.S. immigration system as "broken." Congress has been deadlocked for years on how to reform immigration laws.
"Migrants, especially economic migrants, choose to move in order to improve the future prospects of themselves and their families," the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees says. "Refugees have to move if they are to save their lives or preserve their freedom."
What is a refugee?
A refugee is someone who has been forced to flee his or her home country.
As such, refugees can apply for asylum in the United States, a process that could take years.
Getting refugee status isn't easy.
The applicants have to prove that if they return to their home country, they'll be injured because of their race, religion, nationality, membership in a particular social group or their political opinion.
"Refugees are generally people outside of their country who are unable or unwilling to return home because they fear serious harm," the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services says.
 

Limits—prioritize narrow and predictable limits—“immigration control” and “refugee policy” refer to distinct issues, each with its own set of norms, laws, definitions, and politics. They justify Affirmatives dealing with asylum-seekers or environmental and political refugees.

Ground—the most nuanced links to disadvantages or unique counterplans are based on highly precise legal distinctions and the intricate political framework surrounding immigration reform.

Edited by TheSnowball

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