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I’m going into my second year of debate, and I want to learn about what sources to use when I’m researching. Do you use regular google or google scholar? I was also wondering about think tanks. When should I use them over google, and what are some good ones, because I know a lot of them are politically sponsored? Also, it would be helpful if someone could tell me where is best to look for certain arguments. I will list them down below.

 

1.) Impacts and impact defense

2.) uniqueness

3.) politics da stuff

4.) t interpretations

A.) I know that some t args are from court cases. Eg: T cooch. Where would I find court stuff that I can use for t interpretations?

5.) kritik stuff

6.) and aff stuff

 

Thank you.

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1. Impacts are a very broad topic, and you can find impact cards in many different places. There are plenty of news articles about things like nuclear war, economic decline, supervises, and many other impacts that you could consider traditional. Impacts are also often built into articles, and many academic articles that are making a political argument will have a section about the ramifications of not endorsing their suggestion. I would start from just a google search, then maybe try google scholar or a journal.

2. Uniqueness is probably best found in the news, because more academic articles are better and take more time to write, so they won't be as current. Just use common news sources. You can also use google search tools to set the publication time of results so that you will only be shown articles in the past hour, day, week, etc. This is useful, because it allows you to simply search for a topic, like "trump immigration" and you will find the most recent articles.

3. Politics DA stuff is also probably best gotten from news sources, see 2. The impact cards are often of a higher caliber than news sources, and are often sources from academic articles.

4. T interpretations are often kind of tricky. There are some legal journals that have analysis of cases that define and debate specific words, and these are often pretty good for T cards. You could just go to a dictionary website and do a search for a word, but that might not be the best evidence, due to there being multiple definitions that may conflict. Personally, T interpretations are one of the hardest things for me to research.

           A.  I don't know the best websites to get court analyses from

5. Kritik stuff can be easy to find, but it can also be difficult to find, depending on the argument. You can start with google or google scholar, but I usually use online databases and journals, and I've found a few websites very useful. One big drawback of kritikal literature is that it is often paywall protected, but you can get around that. Evidence for kritiks is often found in surges, and you may find an article or book with 20 or 30 cards, but the next one has none or only a few. The most important things are to read the works cited/sources as a jumping off point, and read the abstract or summary to see if the article looks promising before you spend a few hours on it.

            B. Try academia.edu (free and has lots of articles), http://aaaaarg.fail (You need an invitation to get the actual articles, but it has a pretty large database and most of the articles are kritikal and applicable to debate in some form) , tandfonline.com (articles can be paywalled or hard to access) 

6. Aff stuff is kind of hard to fit into one category, because there are many different kinds of affs. For K affs, look at 5. Policy affs will be mixtures of the other research types, as they will have uniqueness, impacts, politics stuff, etc.

 

 

Finding evidence (especially good evidence) can be pretty difficult, but getting good at it will be very good for your debate career. Learn to use google search tools effectively, look at sources/works cited, read abstracts, and figure out how you research best. 

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One good website is RealClearPolitics (or RealClearDefense, RealClearEducation, etc.)

 

It compiles articles on both sides of the area in question.

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How can you get around paywall protection?

Libgen.io for some books.

 

Sci-hub for paywalls--the url changes because it gets shut down but just Google it.

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