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DnG on neg

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Ik people read DnG against identity affs with like faciality assemblages and lines of flight, but why dont more people read DnG on neg against policy affs it seems like rhizomatic thought would be pretty good against curriculum affs and nomadology could b strategic against heg affs etc altho I have just started DnG so im could be wrong

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People read DnG on the neg, but it's usually as part of a death K, state bad, or the new "dark deleuze" anti-blackness shells. I'm not sold that any of that is a particularly good reading of DnG (nor captures what is good about their method/aims/assumptions) but it wins rounds. 

 

Your first idea sounds really cool! I think more people should be using DnG to interact with the assumptions of the plan instead of just saying, idk, we are all molecules or something. You could make a compelling argument about the scholastic structures the 1AC endorses, perhaps comparing them to psychoanalysis. One or Several Wolves in A Thousand Plateaus is a great criticism of psychoanalysis that definitely applies to modern pedagogical assumptions: in short, the current testing and school structure will always turn wolves into daddies, and wolves are much cooler than daddies. Howl at the moon. 

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People read DnG on the neg, but it's usually as part of a death K, state bad, or the new "dark deleuze" anti-blackness shells. I'm not sold that any of that is a particularly good reading of DnG (nor captures what is good about their method/aims/assumptions) but it wins rounds. 

 

Your first idea sounds really cool! I think more people should be using DnG to interact with the assumptions of the plan instead of just saying, idk, we are all molecules or something. You could make a compelling argument about the scholastic structures the 1AC endorses, perhaps comparing them to psychoanalysis. One or Several Wolves in A Thousand Plateaus is a great criticism of psychoanalysis that definitely applies to modern pedagogical assumptions: in short, the current testing and school structure will always turn wolves into daddies, and wolves are much cooler than daddies. Howl at the moon. 

 

Ok great so I'm starting 1000 Plateaus but I'm wondering if 1.Do i need to read the whole thing because Ik most of the debate args from DnG come from like nomadology, faciality, BwO, and rhizomes or 2.if there are easier secondary works to read of DnG

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Aaditya hmu at Cal this weekend. You prob don't need to read all if ATP. The book is written as a rhizome so that it doesn't have to be taken as a totality or in any particular order. Definitely read the intro tho.

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Aaditya hmu at Cal this weekend. You prob don't need to read all if ATP. The book is written as a rhizome so that it doesn't have to be taken as a totality or in any particular order. Definitely read the intro tho.

particular it read but order, this to you sentence help any You if if do. might have don't in it

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particular it read but order, this to you sentence help any You if if do. might have don't in it

The chapters are able to be read in any order. Like chapter 1 then 5 then 2 Obviously the sentences are coherent.

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The chapters are able to be read in any order. Like chapter 1 then 5 then 2 Obviously the sentences are coherent.

Yeah, I know. I'm just making a rhizome joke.

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sorry to necro this but does anyone have any introductory stuff/secondary sources for DnG specifically about nomadology, faciality, and BwO

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People read DnG on the neg, but it's usually as part of a death K, state bad, or the new "dark deleuze" anti-blackness shells. I'm not sold that any of that is a particularly good reading of DnG (nor captures what is good about their method/aims/assumptions) but it wins rounds. 

 

Your first idea sounds really cool! I think more people should be using DnG to interact with the assumptions of the plan instead of just saying, idk, we are all molecules or something. You could make a compelling argument about the scholastic structures the 1AC endorses, perhaps comparing them to psychoanalysis. One or Several Wolves in A Thousand Plateaus is a great criticism of psychoanalysis that definitely applies to modern pedagogical assumptions: in short, the current testing and school structure will always turn wolves into daddies, and wolves are much cooler than daddies. Howl at the moon. 

what is dark deleuze? 

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what is dark deleuze?

 

It's a book by Andrew Culp which has been read a lot recently as a K of traditional Deleuzian concepts like accelerationism or affirmation. It says that Deleuze's work has been coopted by capitalism through a "canon of joy," which creates a regime of compulsory happiness making the status quo inescapable. Culp says we need to learn to hate the world as it is and to disengage from capitalist forms of connectivity and production that make us dependent upon the state and markets. This leads him to advocate for something resembling guerilla warfare - secret, violent resistance and conspiracy aimed at overthrowing the current world order.

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It's a book by Andrew Culp which has been read a lot recently as a K of traditional Deleuzian concepts like accelerationism or affirmation. It says that Deleuze's work has been coopted by capitalism through a "canon of joy," which creates a regime of compulsory happiness making the status quo inescapable. Culp says we need to learn to hate the world as it is and to disengage from capitalist forms of connectivity and production that make us dependent upon the state and markets. This leads him to advocate for something resembling guerilla warfare - secret, violent resistance and conspiracy aimed at overthrowing the current world order.

I'll start by saying this is a very accurate summary, so kudos to you Sean. 

 

Second: what a terrible read. Why oh WHY would anyone take this position? It's not like the subtitle of BOTH of their major works clearly indicated an INDICTMENT of precisely THIS power of capital... Culp is an absolute tool and I've schooled him at least twice in my life - once in a presentation and once in a group reading. He has no defense of Deleuzeanism once he removes these very same elements because Deleuze's very concept of negativity is an AFFIRMATIVE notion that negativity is BURKEAN and therefore a welcoming of what is not. This isn't some yin/yang infinite corollary. I spent a semester working closely with Ron Bogue - perhaps one of the 3 top living Deleuzean scholars (on PAR with Colebrook and Proveti) and he couldn't help but mock Culp up and down. Why take a philosopher whose entire argument is "change" and chain him to the unrelenting? 

 

This is Peter Hallward all over again. Hallward wrote a book asserting DnG were pro-capital because they respected and feared the power of capital. Hallward was summarily dismissed in a public (published) forum. Culp is not far behind. It's an interesting proposition from a debate perspective, but the more you consider it in context, it's a pointless permutation.

 

OK I'm coming off really hot here but Culp is no expert. He has some provocations and they clearly resonated with a good audience so I'll give him a lot of cred...but I don't think his read is up to snuff. I have a very high threshold for interpreting ATP and AO, and Culp doesn't get there. 

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Culp is an absolute tool and I've schooled him at least twice in my life - once in a presentation and once in a group reading. 

sick, did you ever beat him at tournaments back in the day?

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