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How do I stop the aff from perming an advantage cp. can they even perm or is there I card or something I can read

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The idea of the CP is that it neutralizes an advantage. Whether the judge votes Affirmative or Negative, that impact is solved. You should run the CP with a net-benefit that links to the plan but NOT the CP.

 

So if the plan is to fund STEM and it solves the economy and global warming, maybe you read advantage CPs that do a tax cut to solve the economy and plant solar panels to solve warming. Then you read a federalism DA.

 

World in which the plan is passed: economy solved (good), warming solved (good), federalism wrecked (bad).

 

World in which the CP is passed: economy solved (good), warming solved (good).

 

But doing BOTH the plan and the CP does not have an additional benefit. World in which both are passed: economy solved (good), warming solved (good), federalism wrecked (bad). The economy and warming can't be "double solved" because either the plan or CP can independently sufficiently solve to avert the impact.

 

Or, say you don't run a DA. You read the solar panels CP and you impact-turn the economy by saying growth destroys the environment.

 

World of plan: warming solved (good), economy solved (bad).

 

World of CP: warming solved (good).

 

World of both: warming solved (good), economy solved (bad).

 

The point is that the permutation links to the net-benefit while the CP alone does not, while still sufficiently solving and thereby neutralizing Affirmative offense.

 

Make sense?

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Just read politics and a solar panels CP bc lol why would solar panels link to politics?

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Just read politics and a solar panels CP bc lol why would solar panels link to politics?

Don't mock me, Nick, I made a mistake that day and you don't have to remind me.

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The idea of the CP is that it neutralizes an advantage. Whether the judge votes Affirmative or Negative, that impact is solved. You should run the CP with a net-benefit that links to the plan but NOT the CP.

 

So if the plan is to fund STEM and it solves the economy and global warming, maybe you read advantage CPs that do a tax cut to solve the economy and plant solar panels to solve warming. Then you read a federalism DA.

 

World in which the plan is passed: economy solved (good), warming solved (good), federalism wrecked (bad).

 

World in which the CP is passed: economy solved (good), warming solved (good).

 

But doing BOTH the plan and the CP does not have an additional benefit. World in which both are passed: economy solved (good), warming solved (good), federalism wrecked (bad). The economy and warming can't be "double solved" because either the plan or CP can independently sufficiently solve to avert the impact.

 

Or, say you don't run a DA. You read the solar panels CP and you impact-turn the economy by saying growth destroys the environment.

 

World of plan: warming solved (good), economy solved (bad).

 

World of CP: warming solved (good).

 

World of both: warming solved (good), economy solved (bad).

 

The point is that the permutation links to the net-benefit while the CP alone does not, while still sufficiently solving and thereby neutralizing Affirmative offense.

 

Make sense?

 

do you read one cp that solves all advantages or read a cp for each advantage and if its the second do you go for all the cps you read in the 2nr?

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do you read one cp that solves all advantages or read a cp for each advantage and if its the second do you go for all the cps you read in the 2nr?

If you want to cover multiple advantages you can combine them into planks of one counterplan. You do have to decide whether each plank is conditional or if the counterplan has to stick together.

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