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Keagan

ALL UTNIF CAMP FILES

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Why did you need to comment more than once for this?

 

Maybe because there were multiple threads?

 

Why not just stfu?

You first, and while you're at it, do please disclose your files. Edited by Raj
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They're on openev if you wish for them (most of them atleast).

Edited by Raj

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actually none of them are

The context of the conversation actually reveals that I wasn't actually referring to the UTNIF files but my personal ones, since he specifically asked why didn't I disclose my files.

Edited by Raj

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The context of the conversation actually reveals that I wasn't actually referring to the UTNIF files but my personal ones, since he specifically asked why didn't I disclose my files.

My b

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gendered lang is bad 

SORRY GUYS, I JUST HAD TO DO IT FOR DISCLOSURE THEORY

 

https://goo.gl/YUOBDo

I. DISCLOSING ALL FILES USED IN DEBATE ARE Key to education because more rigorous peer review means better quality evidence.

Torvalds and Diamond ‘1 [Linus (Creator of Linux) and David (freelance contributor to the New York Times and Business Week); “Why Open Source Makes Sense”; Educause Review; November/December; p. 71-2]

It's the best illustration of the limitless benefits to be derived from the open source philosophy. While the PC wasn't developed using the open source model, it is an example of a technology that was opened for any person or company to clone and improve and sell. In its purest form, the open source model allows anyone to participate in a project's development or commercial exploitation. Linux is obviously the most successful example. What started out in my messy Helsinki bedroom has grown to become the largest collaborative project in the history of the world. It began as an ideology shared by software developers who believed that computer source code should be shared freely, with the General Public License - the anticopyright - as the movement's powerful tool. It evolved to become a method for the continuous development of the best technology. And it evolved further to accept widespread market acceptance, as seen in the snowballing adoption of Linux as an operating system for web servers, and in its unexpectedly generous IPOs. What was inspired by ideology has proved itself as technology and is working in the marketplace. Now open source expanding beyond the technical and business domains. At Harvard University Law School, professors Larry Lessig (who is now at Stanford) and Charles Nesson have brought the open source model to law. They started the Open Law Project, which relies on volunteer lawyers and law students posting opinions and research on the project's Web site to help develop arguments and briefs challenging the United States Copyright Extension Act. The theory is that the strongest arguments will be developed when the largest number of legal minds are working on a project, and as a mountain of information is generated through postings and repostings. The site nicely sums up the trade off from the traditional approach: "What we lose in secrecy, we expect to regain in depth of sources and breadth of argument." (Put in another context: With a million eyes, all software bugs will vanish.) It's a wrinkle on how academic research has been conducted for years, but one that makes sense on a number of fronts. Think of how this approach could speed up the development of cures for diseases, for example. Or how, with the best minds on the task, international diplomacy could be strengthened. As the world becomes smaller, as the pace of life and business intensifies, and as the technology and information become available, people realise the tight-fisted approach is becoming increasingly outmoded. The theory behind open source is simple. In the case of an operating system - is free. Anyone can improve it, change it, exploit it. But those improvements, changes and exploitations have to be made freely available. Think Zen. The project belongs to no one and everyone. When a project is opened up, there is rapid and continual improvement. With teams of contributors working in parallel, the results can happen far more speedily and successfully than if the work were being conducted behind closed doors. That's what we experienced with Linux. Imagine: Instead of a tiny cloistered development team working in secret, you have a monster on your side. Potentially millions of the brightest minds are contributing to the project, and are supported by a peer-review process that has no, er, peer. The first time people hear about the open source approach, it sounds ludicrous. That's why it has taken years for the message of its virtues to sink in. Ideology isn't what has sold the open source model. It started gaining attention when it was obvious that open source was the best method of developing and improving the highest quality technology. And now it is winning in the marketplace, an accomplishment has brought open source its greatest acceptance. Companies were able to be created around numerous value-added services, or to use open source as a way of making a technology popular. When the money rolls in, people get convinced. One of the least understood pieces of the open source puzzle is how so many good programmers would deign to work for absolutely no money. A word about motivation is in order. In a society where survival is more or less assured, money is not the greatest of motivators. It's been well established that folks do their best work when they are driven by a passion. When they are having fun. This is as true for playwrights and sculptors and entrepreneurs as it is for software engineers. The open source model gives people the opportunity to live their passion. To have fun and to work with the world's best programmers, not the few who happen to be employed by their company. Open source developers strive to earn the esteem of their peers. That's got to be highly motivating.

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someone's got a lot of free time...

What logic got you from "honest injun" to me having a lot of time to spare?

Could've been spent cutting some GOOD files if you know what i mean...

You're one to talk.

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SORRY GUYS, I JUST HAD TO DO IT FOR DISCLOSURE THEORY

 

The necessity to give out camp files is somewhat questionable, especially concerning the UTNIF who is will usually release files on open evidence as soon as the site goes online for that particular year.

 

However, this year for some reason or another, they've decided not to.

Being someone who has access to these files, I've decided to treat them like files I have access to, but have only partially worked on myself. I've also worked with other debaters (including Raj) to trade said files; Though in accordance with the Evidence Trading policy, I'd only expect to see other unreleased, not-worked-on camp files.

 

Keagan, please acknowledge that creating a new thread in the "Help Me" forum using all caps, gendered language, and a rick-roll link may irritate other debaters who use this site.

If a mod would remove the twenty or something downvotes, that'd be cool; As for the files, if someone wants to link them I'm all for it and I'll treat them as stated above.

Edited by LeKritiker
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