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What K's do you believe in?

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marx K/cap k/some of ddev, most of anthro (not the suicide of humanity or whatever alt tho), death good (OK NO I DON'T LIKE WHEN PEOPLE DIE I have empathy I am still sad from last week when one of my teachers died of cancer, but I believe that if there wasn't death then the world would have been destroyed many many years ago), some antiblackness K's (I don't believe in some more radical alts), camus's work is interesting to me as well. I started debating this year so I am still a n00b in the philosophical world... but hopefully that can change soon :)

accidentally downvoted; upvoted you elsewhere to make up for it

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Foucault, I find truth in the Panopticon. I also got to analyze some Giroux evidence this year that I really do believe in. And definitely the cap k and fem k I find the impacts legitimate.

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Foucault, I find truth in the Panopticon. I also got to analyze some Giroux evidence this year that I really do believe in. And definitely the cap k and fem k I find the impacts legitimate.

 

There's a lot of literature out there (see Haggerty and Ericson 2K, Browne 12, Browne '15) that criticize the use of a panopticon as a model for explaining contemporary surveillance. Surveillance isn't this centralized node of information-gathering that tracks all of the data and information in the world and redirects it back to some central hub. Rather, surveillance has evolved to something more, in a Deleuzean sense, rhizomatic in the sense that it is disorganized and spread out throughout the entire world like a web. Although there are a lot of organizations that surveil, these are just particular instances of what Haggerty and Ericson 2K call the surveillance assemblage. It's an assemblage because there isn't just one surveillance organization doing all of the surveillance, rather surveillance is characterized by a distribution amongst different organizations and structures. Saying that surveillance is panoptic is, then, reductionist because it doesn't assume the complexity of contemporary modes of surveillance. And that's just assuming the technological/informational aspect of it, the surveillance assemblage can include things such as what George Yancey describes as the white gaze; immaterial, yet very real, systems of surveillance that result in the internalization of black inferiority (think of like Fanon's epidermalization, except applied to a global system of surveillance). 

Edited by Theparanoiacmachine
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Complexity

I really liked your pandora's box from that vdebate. Thought it was a straightforward K with a solid alt.

OP knows less about K lit than y'all, but I agree with foucault a lot; the panopticon is legit and geneology is a cool way of approaching stuff. Heidegger seems relevant too, I definitely buy calculative thought bad and standing reserve sort of stuff, especially when it intersects with anthro. 

 

I read lacan a lot but freud was too coked up for me to take psych seriously.

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I really liked your pandora's box from that vdebate. Thought it was a straightforward K with a solid alt.

OP knows less about K lit than y'all, but I agree with foucault a lot; the panopticon is legit and geneology is a cool way of approaching stuff. Heidegger seems relevant too, I definitely buy calculative thought bad and standing reserve sort of stuff, especially when it intersects with anthro. 

 

I read lacan a lot but freud was too coked up for me to take psych seriously.

 

I thought Foucault's genealogy was an extension on Nietzsche's genealogy? 

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I thought Foucault's genealogy was an extension on Nietzsche's genealogy? 

 

Yeah, but Nietzsche didn't really articulate or use his genealogy that much, I'm pretty sure he just used it to critique morality. It was Foucault who thought to apply genealogy to societal stuff to examine power relations/ uncover lost histories. But yeah, Foucault was inspired by Nietzsche.

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Jacksons books on Counter-Terrorism and how it's used to justify atrocities all seems real world and current. On that concept, Giroux's book, Americas Addiction to Terror, is pretty damn fire.

Edited by OneOffPresumption
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