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Straight up cards that say something along the lines of "We live in a corporate surveillance state" and "Corporations have a tight grip on government"

 

I mean, I would think they'd be easier to find, but I've looked off for some, but then, I suck at evidence searching.

 

I can't promise anything spectacular in return, but I'll do my best.

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3. Privatization of security fuels the military industrial complex- turns the aff

Turley 14 (Jonathan, the Shapiro Professor of Public Interest Law at George Washington University, “Big money behind war: the military-industrial complex”, 1/11, http://www.aljazeera.com/indepth/opinion/2014/01/big-money-behind-war-military-industrial-complex-20141473026736533.html)CDD

The new military-industrial complex is fuelled by a conveniently ambiguous and unseen enemy: the terrorist. Former President George W Bush and his aides insisted on calling counter-terrorism efforts a "war". This concerted effort by leaders like former Vice President Dick Cheney (himself the former CEO of defence-contractor Halliburton) was not some empty rhetorical exercise. Not only would a war maximise the inherent powers of the president, but it would maximise the budgets for military and homeland agencies. This new coalition of companies, agencies, and lobbyists dwarfs the system known by Eisenhower when he warned Americans to "guard against the acquisition of unwarranted influence… by the military-industrial complex". Ironically, it has had some of its best days under President Barack Obama who has radically expanded drone attacks and claimed that he alone determines what a war is for the purposes of consulting Congress. Investment in homeland security companies is expected to yield a 12 percent annual growth through 2013 - an astronomical return when compared to other parts of the tanking economy. Good for economy? While few politicians are willing to admit it, we don't just endure wars we seem to need war - at least for some people. A study showed that roughly 75 percent of the fallen in these wars come from working class families. They do not need war. They pay the cost of the war. Eisenhower would likely be appalled by the size of the industrial and governmental workforce committed to war or counter-terrorism activities. Military and homeland budgets now support millions of people in an otherwise declining economy. Hundreds of billions of dollars flow each year from the public coffers to agencies and contractors who have an incentive to keep the country on a war-footing - and footing the bill for war. Across the country, the war-based economy can be seen in an industry which includes everything from Homeland Security educational degrees to counter-terrorism consultants to private-run preferred traveller programmes for airport security gates. Recently, the "black budget" of secret intelligence programmes alone was estimated at $52.6bn for 2013. That is only the secret programmes, not the much larger intelligence and counterintelligence budgets. We now have 16 spy agencies that employ 107,035 employees. This is separate from the over one million people employed by the military and national security law enforcement agencies. The core of this expanding complex is an axis of influence of corporations, lobbyists, and agencies that have created a massive, self-sustaining terror-based industry. The contractors In the last eight years, trillions of dollars have flowed to military and homeland security companies. When the administration starts a war like Libya, it is a windfall for companies who are given generous contracts to produce everything from replacement missiles to ready-to-eat meals. In the first 10 days of the Libyan war alone, the administration spent roughly $550m. That figure includes about $340m for munitions - mostly cruise missiles that must be replaced. Not only did Democratic members of Congress offer post-hoc support for the Libyan attack, but they also proposed a permanent authorisation for presidents to attack targets deemed connected to terrorism - a perpetual war on terror. The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) offers an even steadier profit margin. According to Morgan Keegan, a wealth management and capital firm, investment in homeland security companies is expected to yield a 12 percent annual growth through 2013 - an astronomical return when compared to other parts of the tanking economy.

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Here's some Giroux. He has a ton of stuff like this if you're looking for an author

 

Giroux 14 Henry A. Giroux is a world renowned educator, author and public intellectual. He currently holds the Global TV Network Chair Professorship at McMaster University in the English and Cultural Studies Department and a Distinguished Visiting Professorship at Ryerson University. A prolific writer and political commentator, he writes regularly for Truthout and serves on their board of directors. (Henry Giroux. “The Violence of Organized Forgetting: Thinking Beyond America's Disimagination Machine.” July 21, 2014. Print. ) DD

Neoliberalism creates a political landscape devoid of public accountability, access, and agency, which is to say devoid of democracy itself. As a predatory competition for hoarding profit, neoliberalism produces massive inequality in wealth and income, shifts political power to financial elites, destroys all vestiges of the social contract, and increasingly views “unproductive” sectors— most often those marginalized by race, class, disability, resident status, and age— as suspicious, potentially criminal, and ultimately disposable. It thus criminalizes social problems and manufactures profit by commercializing surveillance, policing, and prisons. The views and concerns of elite private privilege and competitive ownership now out-compete and replace notions of the public good, civic community, and solidarity. Under neoliberalism the social is pathologized while violence and war are normalized, packaged and marketed as cartoons, video games, television, cinema, and other highly profitable entertainment products. Neoliberalism indebts the public to feed the profits of the rich by spending obscene amounts ons militarization, surveillance, and war. In the end, it becomes a virulent antagonist to the very institutions meant to eliminate human suffering, protect the environment, uphold the right of unions, and provide resources for those in need. As a rival to egalitarianism and the public good, neoliberalism has no real solutions to the host of economic, political, and social problems generated as its by-products.

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I actually have a great file that I like to call the Corporate Cap K - basically aff takes away gov surveillance, so corporations do it, which is worse and turns the case and links to cap

 

PM me if you want to trade for it :)

 

Edit: I also have like half of the articles giroux's written in the last year cut, so if you want those pm me as well

Edited by AltsNeverSolve

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