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TheSnowball

Cloud Computing Confusion

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Hey all,

I see a lot of advantages that say "surveillance hurts cloud computing" "cloud computing key to whatever." Does surveillance hurt cloud computing as a whole? I mean, are scientists really going to be unwilling to conduct or share disease or warming research through the cloud because the NSA might see it?

I made a theoretical file for this with a few cards, but I'm not sure if what I cut actually makes sense. Attached.

Thanks,

Rniv

Cloud Computing.docx

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I don't have specific cards to counter the info you presented.

 

However, from previous knowledge I know that Climate scientists use data stored on private clouds that is also accessible to the public. I don't see how the NSA being able to seize the data could impact sharing or conducting research. In fact the scientific community is based on a principle of knowledge sharing. 

 

If anything a public cloud could benefit them through the ability to share information more easily. However, they would still have data centers processing incoming data, and they follow with analyzing the data. It only benefits them to share it and have more analysis faster.

 

I like these cards, and they could be used to make a great aff for a couple of early tournaments. However, I think it would be easy to point out that the scientific community stands on principles of information sharing, making the Harms or significance almost nothing.

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also, the (Boyce, 10) card really describes an example of private cloud computing, the German Climate Computing Center, which was an old model before the term cloud was sort of hi-jacked. However, these kind of private data centers are now being presented to the world via a client side tool that shows the data being calculated and analyzed via graphs usually via a web browser.

 

In fact you can go look at all the data right here: http://cera-www.dkrz.de/WDCC/ui/

 

So it just seems counter-intuitive to say that it would hurt scientific orgs such as this.

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Just read cloud computing bad. Most people in the IT industry agree that US internet infrastructure is not sufficient to handle it and it's a nightmare for IT people all around the world. 

 

No seriously I'm a Computer Science major. 

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I don't have specific cards to counter the info you presented.

 

However, from previous knowledge I know that Climate scientists use data stored on private clouds that is also accessible to the public. I don't see how the NSA being able to seize the data could impact sharing or conducting research. In fact the scientific community is based on a principle of knowledge sharing. 

 

If anything a public cloud could benefit them through the ability to share information more easily. However, they would still have data centers processing incoming data, and they follow with analyzing the data. It only benefits them to share it and have more analysis faster.

 

I like these cards, and they could be used to make a great aff for a couple of early tournaments. However, I think it would be easy to point out that the scientific community stands on principles of information sharing, making the Harms or significance almost nothing.

So is it legitimate for teams to say "NSA surveillance hurts cloud computing because people won't want their data in the cloud" and "that would affect the kind of CC used for climate modeling, genome sequencing, disease modeling, healthcare, etc."?

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So is it legitimate for teams to say "NSA surveillance hurts cloud computing because people won't want their data in the cloud" and "that would affect the kind of CC used for climate modeling, genome sequencing, disease modeling, healthcare, etc."?

They will say they won't want it in American cloud companies. The argument is that the US is a technological leader and what-not which is key to hegemony or advancing cloud computing. If they just go for cloud computing is key to research you could argue the research still exists, just won't be coming from America, but I'm sure there are good responses to that.

 

http://www2.itif.org/2013-cloud-computing-costs.pdf

 

As per that, which I believe is the root of all data that PRISM/NSA hurts cloud computing, it specifically notes that people just wouldn't invest in the American industry. Although, there may be other articles saying something else, and derive different conclusions, so feel free to correct me.

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Depends on the scenario.

 

For warming the internal link that I've seen more is that it collapses the industry because a bunch of people jump ship. If the industry collapses, it doesn't matter if scientists aren't worried because there won't be the cloud computing advances they need to be able to model climate data or whatever.

 

With a disease scenario it makes more sense that Pharma wouldn't want patented stuff in the cloud. 

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With a disease scenario it makes more sense that Pharma wouldn't want patented stuff in the cloud.

 

I'm curious as to what this evidence looks like--I'm fairly sure Pharma doesn't want any of its stuff in public clouds for a ton of much stronger reasons than fear of government surveillance. Pharma companies are absolutely paranoid about protecting their confidential information.

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With a disease scenario it makes more sense that Pharma wouldn't want patented stuff in the cloud. 

I think with disease, it's more that disease and vaccination research is done via inputting information and a conglomerate of computers running analysis on said data and if we hurt the industry then we use less of these things for genome sequencing, disease patterns etc. It's important to recognize cloud computing isn't just storage, it's data analysis as well.

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I'm curious as to what this evidence looks like--I'm fairly sure Pharma doesn't want any of its stuff in public clouds for a ton of much stronger reasons than fear of government surveillance. Pharma companies are absolutely paranoid about protecting their confidential information.

I wouldn't imagine they use public clouds*, but some of the times I've seen cloud computing scenarios when judging at camp this year has focused on how the governments surveillance creates backdoors that end up being exploited by other groups, or at the least perceived as being vulnerable by those who use various cloud applications. 

 

* http://www.webopedia.com/TERM/P/private_cloud.html

Edited by SnarkosaurusRex
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