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So at a local scrimmage, we lost to a Queer Theory K and their alternative was to queercrip the 1AC to death, I don't think it was articulated well enough for me to understand it, so our responses were pretty generic - what is this alternative? What does it do, mean..etc. I don't have the card, it was on paper.

 

Any help is appreciated.

Edited by ConsultVerminSupreme

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So at a local scrimmage, we lost to a Queer Theory K and their alternative was to queercrip the 1AC to death, I don't think it was articulated well enough for me to understand it, so our responses were pretty generic - what is this alternative? What does it do, mean..etc. I don't have the card, it was on paper.

 

Any help is appreciated.

An alt can literally be anything (which is why there's probably no one knows what this one did/does).

 

It's on you to get these questions answered in CX of the 1NC.

 

But to actually answer:

 

A quick search result revealed Edgemont KX was the only team who read this alt, meaning either A) you hit them, which in that case they would've explained the alt well, or B) the team you hit stole the alt to sound cool and didn't actually know what they were talking about (most likely result).

 

If you have questions about it, you can email either member of KX.

Edited by aram
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An alt can literally be anything (which is why there's probably no one knows what this one did/does).

 

It's on you to get these questions answered in CX of the 1NC.

 

But to actually answer:

 

A quick search result revealed Edgemont KX was the only team who read this alt, meaning either A) you hit them, which in that case they would've explained the alt well, or B) the team you hit stole the alt to sound cool and didn't actually know what they were talking about (most likely result).

 

If you have questions about it, you can email either member of KX.

 

Yeah it definitely wasn't edgemont - it was a local team from cali, so you're probably right, they stole it and didn't know what in the hell they were talking about.

 

Thanks for the help, I've emailed Vikram about it :)

 

EDIT: Here's the card from edgemont, if someone could read and explain the thesis of the alt anyway or what you get out of it

 

Thus, vote negative to queercrip the 1AC to death.

Santiago Solis, Winter-xx-2007, doctoral student, Learning Dis/abilities, Teachers College @ Columbia, “Snow White and the Seven ‘Dwarfs’—Queercripped,” pg. 114-131, jstor

 

Ultimately, in “Snow White,” fantasy has such a normalizing function that it is no longer about the reader using her or his imagination to conceptualize unfamiliar realities or unexplored possibilities; instead, the story attempts to restrict or regulate the reader’s imagination by producing its own vision and version of the ideal fantasy—one that negates the existence of homosexuality and disability. In this way, the story operates as a historical narrative as it mirrors what society considers objectionable, indecent, and immoral. Through subtle and open forms of marginalization and silencing, it reinforces and extends homophobia and ableism. Consequently, as the process of homogenization and normalization suppresses alternative sexual and bodily identities, the young female reader may begin to replicate privileged ways of being in the world. After all is said and done, Snow White herself is the embodiment of the classical beauty that girls (but not boys) are expected to reproduce. “Snow White” continues to be a popular fairy tale because it perpetuates sexual and bodily ideals that the mainstream values and sustains. The idealized virtuosity and desirable beauty of Snow White—her presumed feminine qualities (subservient, virginal, defenseless, dependent, delicate, refined, ablebodied, and heterosexual)—help produce the ideal image of how young girls should behave or what they should look like. In a society in which the male gaze dominates, the female body is already viewed as an object of desire, and Snow White’s objectification is not seen as problematic from that perspective. The female body, and the heterosexual and able-bodied female in particular, becomes a site for a specific kind of sexual desire. However, what is striking about the “Snow White” story is that rather than explicitly rejecting the undesirable homosexual and disabled body, it simply disqualifies them as nonexistent—insidiously—through omission. Furthermore, the rhetoric of infantilization that is used to represent the seven dwarfs serves multiple purposes. First, the physical shortcomings that the dwarfs presumably embody confirm ideas about manhood; their disabled bodies explicitly contradict normal conventions of masculinity (sexuality, virility, and so on). The dwarfs are represented as displaced children, and therefore not as real men. Second, the dwarfs are emasculated. Since the Prince is the only one who can view Snow White through the male gaze, it is only he, not the emasculated and infantilized dwarfs, who can claim sovereign authority over Snow White. And since society presumes everyone is heterosexual unless stated otherwise, the Prince is automatically assumed to be only and exclusively heterosexual and, therefore, he must fall in love with Snow White. Third, because of the masculine prowess the Prince displays, young boys (but not girls) are expected and even encouraged to identify with him. Since the Prince epitomizes heterosexual and able-bodied manliness—physical qualities that are recognized and admired by mainstream society—young boys quickly learn to emulate these bodily traits and behaviors. To reiterate, contemporary audiences continue to accept the fairy tale because the story extends idealized notions of social and sexual behaviors, which, as I have argued, are based on heterosexist and ableist apprehensions. I attempted to explore a range of conceivable responses that “Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs” might provoke to ascertain how different authors and illustrators have negotiated the stigma and invisibility surrounding homosexuality and disability. Furthermore, I proceeded chronologically to determine if more recent publications progress toward affirmative representations. Unfortunately, even contemporary variations on the tale continue to produce a public imagery that supports hetero-corporo-normative desire and identity; none of them depart from or defy heterosexist and ableist norms. For this reason, I tried to pay attention to that which remains silenced or unsaid. In doing so, I discovered a number of discounted erotic possibilities (for example, between the dwarfs, between the dwarfs and the Prince, and between the dwarfs and Snow White). But what does it mean, after all, to suppress or negate queercrip representations? Why should future tellings incorporate or provide a queercrip perspective? In other words, What function would a queercrip approach serve? A queercrip reading of the story offers the potential to explore sexual fantasies that might inform and transform narrow images of desirability. The eroticization of the queercrip body, for example, can instill pride and foster public affirmation for queercripness. Queercripness is located “not so much in any specifically . . . [queercrip] practice but in a larger liberation of psychic and social life, one that gives defiantly corporeal form to the repressed materials and forbidden fantasies” 2002, 161). Through the lens of queercripness a fear of sexual fantasies that might be perceived as “deviant” is not only displaced, but fear itself is subsequently replaced by a desire for varied forms of corporeal lustfulness. In this way, each type of body, or body type, is seen as a new source of sexual inspiration. Queercripness, therefore, does not in itself promote homosexuality; instead, it seeks to generate new social conditions from which all types of people can be sexually expressive and passionately embodied. In short, queercripness undoes dichotomized distinctions between the normative and the non-normative. Ultimately, we must challenge rigid definitions of sexuality based on acceptable preferences and identities if picture books are ever to represent all of our corporeal functions and diversities. Hence, countering heterosexism and ableism demands more than “positive” representations requiring assimilation into the dominant culture; instead, representations need to draw upon ambiguities with the understanding that queercripness can never be fully captured, contained, mastered, or disciplined. It is something that is fluid, “since there is no law which can guarantee that things will have ‘one, true meaning,’ or that meanings won’t change over time” (Hall 2001, 9). What queercripness offers, therefore, is a critical stance with respect to heterosexism and ableism. So how can we use queercripness to think forward? Queercripness provides awareness and an urge to question and to problematize. For example, in the four versions of “Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs” examined here, we witness time and again how the seven dwarfs play “a supporting role, serving as a marker for larger narratives about normalcy and legitimacy” (Davidson 2003, 57). However, as sexual fantasies are allowed to surface from the dwarfs’ bodies, spaces of dialogue emerge, spaces from which children can explore “humanizing possibilities” (Greene 1988). But how can teachers and parents transform newfound sexual fantasies into age-appropriate conversations? How can fairy tales like “Snow White” help initiate constructive dialogues? Is it preferable to talk openly about sexual fantasies, or should they continue to function as unacknowledged sexual perversions? These questions force us to consider what sexual practices are most valued in our culture as well as what sexual knowledge deserves to be validated and discussed. According to Jonathan Silin, “When innocence is defined by the absence of the experience presumed to characterize adulthood, the protection of childhood requires controlling access to the knowledge that would signal its loss” (1995, 122). From this perspective, the child is presumed to be unaware of her or his own sexual desires and therefore in constant need of supervision. Unfortunately, even though queercripness promotes multiple ways of knowing, controversial issues such as homosexuality and disability that fall outside the realm of the hetero-corporo-normative are often treated as beyond the child’s immediate intellectual understanding or conceptual scope. In this regard, we are uncomfortable whenever the child has too much knowledge or information about anything queercripped, which brings me back to my opening remarks. In retrospect, my innocence (or ignorance) of homosexuality as a child made me fearful of my homoerotic fantasies. For me, the presumption of hetero-corporo-normativity was extremely limiting in that I grew up feeling ashamed and socially ostracized. Because homosexuality was not part of my daily experience, I grew up with a great deal of self-hatred. I knew I was “different” and this “difference” impelled me into a world of darkness where I remained well into adulthood, for only then was I allowed the opportunity to express my sexuality. Hence the questions: If my sexuality was silenced as a child, how might homodisabled children feel about themselves? Do they feel valued and appreciated as they read different versions of “Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs”? Fortunately, queercripness has made hetero-corporo-normativity questionable, a politically charged phenomenon to be problematized and challenged rather than presupposed or elided. This questioning has begun to unpack what it means to be a child seeking information about sexual identities. However, at what age is it appropriate to talk openly with children about queercripness? In other words, how young is too young before a child’s sexuality ceases to be suppressed or denied? How can a child’s sexual identity be incorporated into the child’s natural development? When, how, and why do we attempt to regulate the child’s sexual identity by reproducing hetero-corporo-normative practices that support “acceptable” feminine and masculine behaviors? And how do these social practices work to protract the institutionalization of homophobia and ableism? While we deliberate over such questions, one thing is certain: the concealment of sexual identities related to homosexuality and disability will only assure the continued isolation of children, especially homodisabled youths, who seek guidance and support. It is because of this group of children that I offer this analysis of “Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs,” in the hope that they will not have to grow up, as I did, in distress over their sexuality.

Edited by ConsultVerminSupreme

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So, um, you go rewrite Snow White as a disabled lesbian to be awoken by Princess Charming, and we'll go solve the problems caused by intrusive government surveillance. I.e., perm do both.

 

Also, independently vote Neg down for gross powertagging, since the card is entirely about fairy tales, not policy options.

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a) They never claimed that it would be about policy options, the point is that it's not.

B) Queer =/= lesbian

c) The card is about the conception of a normal body or normal action, it never claims to solve problems about surveillance.

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c) The card is about the conception of a normal body or normal action, it never claims to solve problems about surveillance.

Which probably means it doesn't solve the aff (much less the links)

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Michigan KM also did some stuff with queercripping if I remember correctly. You could try backtracking cites to figure out what the teams read against it as well from the wiki.

 

It looks to be an amalgamation of disability/queer/feminism where the idea is to inject counterhegemonic narratives and images into spaces and institutions to change people's perceptions of queer/disabled individuals and expose problematic practices. Basically change the reps.

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Which probably means it doesn't solve the aff (much less the links)

a) This was the oceans topic, and it solved those specific links

B) The entire point of 95% of kritiks is to argue the aff's impacts are constructed, if you're a smart debater you don't need to win you solve the aff.

 

Michigan KM also did some stuff with queercripping if I remember correctly. You could try backtracking cites to figure out what the teams read against it as well from the wiki.

 

It looks to be an amalgamation of disability/queer/feminism where the idea is to inject counterhegemonic narratives and images into spaces and institutions to change people's perceptions of queer/disabled individuals and expose problematic practices. Basically change the reps.

Queer suicide bombing, never queercripping.

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So, um, you go rewrite Snow White as a disabled lesbian

 

Actually this kinda like what the original(?) aff for this did: this v-debate's 1AC. Yeah, queercripping is basically what Snark says.

 

finding this changed me as a novice debater

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Actually this kinda like what the original(?) aff for this did: this v-debate's 1AC. Yeah, queercripping is basically what Snark says.

 

finding this changed me as a novice debater

 

...what in the hell was that aff

 

"Can you disclose your aff?"

"Sure, we're reading a Snow White Dwarf Rape Queercripping Performance Story Aff"

"..."

Edited by ConsultVerminSupreme
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...what in the hell was that aff

 

"Can you disclose your aff?"

"Sure, we're reading a Snow White Dwarf Rape Queercripping Performance Story Aff"

"..."

That was my reaction to it; thus the 1NC. 

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