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Hi all,

 

I wanted to read a bit on foucault and biopower before the new topic. Does anybody know of a book/paper that describes foucault and biopolitics/biopower in a nutshell?

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Use a link hider so you can get like 2 cents of profits from it and it's not obvious as to what it is 

 

I liked the "Foucault in 90 minutes" book that a friend gave me my sophomore year to read on a flight to a tournament. It's a pretty great generic overview of his theories. Outside of that, I'd just go and read Discipline and Punish or A History of Sexuality. Unfortunately, Foucault concludes that "bio-power" is inevitable and offers no alt (and makes no value claims) to any of it. You have to go to Agamben for the impacts/alt. Foucault is really strong for what he writes about the inexorability between power and knowledge and how surveillance comes into play (see the Penopticon chapter in Discipline and Punish and I think there's a book of his essay's called "Power/Knowledge") 

 

Also, I think the work that Foucault and his disciples have done with talking about norms needs to be applied to meta-critiques of debate. Pretty sure that you could use him in a Baudrillard-esque "debate bad" kind of argument because his analysis of discourse and the power it holds to inscribe norms is top tier 

Edited by RainSilves
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Also, I think the work that Foucault and his disciples have done with talking about norms needs to be applied to meta-critiques of debate. Pretty sure that you could use him in a Baudrillard-esque "debate bad" kind of argument because his analysis of discourse and the power it holds to inscribe norms is top tier 

You sure do love those Debate bad args

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LOL Ritik you can just email me for help 

 

Start with Subject and Power (that gives really good basic info about what Foucault actually means by power, genealogy, discursive power, disciplines etc) and Foucault Help (describes what dif types of powers are and gives good example).

 

Then read Discipline and Punish and History of Sexuality (copies are available online).

 

Some of his lectures also might be helpful like Society Must be Defended, Security, Terror, Population, and Birth of Biopower.

 

Then if you want more clarification you can read some secondary sources like Foucault Reader by Rabinow,  Foucault on Politics, Security, War, and Beyond Society and Hermeneutics also by Rabinow.

 

But mainly reading Discipline and Punish and History of Sexuality will really be beneficial in what Foucault is talking about in terms of power and his genealogical approach. 

 

 

Foucault Help.docx

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Also, I think the work that Foucault and his disciples have done with talking about norms needs to be applied to meta-critiques of debate. Pretty sure that you could NOT use him in a Baudrillard-esque "debate bad" kind of argument because his analysis of discourse and the power it holds to inscribe norms is top tier 

 

fixed

 

https://mitpress.mit.edu/books/forget-foucault

Edited by ARGogate
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Use a link hider so you can get like 2 cents of profits from it and it's not obvious as to what it is 

 

I liked the "Foucault in 90 minutes" book that a friend gave me my sophomore year to read on a flight to a tournament. It's a pretty great generic overview of his theories. Outside of that, I'd just go and read Discipline and Punish or A History of Sexuality. Unfortunately, Foucault concludes that "bio-power" is inevitable and offers no alt (and makes no value claims) to any of it. You have to go to Agamben for the impacts/alt. Foucault is really strong for what he writes about the inexorability between power and knowledge and how surveillance comes into play (see the Penopticon chapter in Discipline and Punish and I think there's a book of his essay's called "Power/Knowledge") 

 

Also, I think the work that Foucault and his disciples have done with talking about norms needs to be applied to meta-critiques of debate. Pretty sure that you could use him in a Baudrillard-esque "debate bad" kind of argument because his analysis of discourse and the power it holds to inscribe norms is top tier 

 

This is not wholly accurate. Despite the inevitability of power relations and different forms of biopolitics, the critique still functions. In fact, that's way Foucault positions himself as a militant activist. The point of deciding what power relations to oppose and what forms of resist to take make up the entire later half of Foucault's work and mark the ethical turn. Check out the collection of lecture paper's called "Ethics: Subjectivity and Truth" and it elucidates this question quite a bit.

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[...]

Holy shit its my long lost cousin Smarf 

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Holy shit its my long lost cousin Smarf 

I jumped on the Snarf name change bandwagon. 

 

EDIT: if only my profile picture would actually change

Edited by S0arf
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http://www.npr.org/2015/08/23/432622096/how-solitary-confinement-became-hardwired-in-u-s-prisons

 

Prison officials looking for a quick fix so started building new isolation wards in prisons, and they also designed an entirely new kind of prison known as a Supermax correctional facility.

 

These are separate prisons that function very much like Eastern State Penitentiary did in the 1800s, locking inmates in cells for 23 hours a day with little interaction with guards or other prisoners. Nazgol Ghandnoosh of The Sentencing Project says solitary confinement is now hardwired into the architecture of America's prisons.

 

"Right now there are are at least 20 Supermax prisons, and they hold 20,000 people," Ghandnoosh says. "[At] one of the prisons in California, Pelican Bay, for example, half of the prison population, 500 people, have been there for more than 10 years."

 

Some inmates have been confined in solitary for 20, 30, even 40 years at a time. The practice is now such a standard disciplinary tool in the U.S. that even nonviolent inmates are often placed in isolation for months or years at a time.

 

"I think it's very important for prison authorities and the public to reflect on whether it's humane to subject people to this form of isolation that play havoc with people's sanity," Ghandnoosh says.

 

see related discussion of the Auburn model versus the Philadelphia model in this post: https://www.cross-x.com/topic/44193-problems-with-any-alternative-to-foucaultbiopolitics/?p=753807 - and "bodies and architectures" in this one: https://www.cross-x.com/topic/43722-jon-sharps-foucault-lecture/?p=750649.

Edited by Lazzarone

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