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Proof of benefits of spreading?

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Hi, my friends and I are doing some debate work over the summer and we found out about an arg another team from our district plans to run this season. These pussys are too stupid to learn how to spread, so next year they're gonna make a 'speed bad' kritik. My team and I know about the benefits of spreading (it improves memory, helps you think faster etc) but I've had a hard time finding any articles or studies to back me up.

 

I don't need any completed evidence, but can someone point me to some sources that show the benefits of spreading? My coach told me about some studies last year but I forgot to ask for them.

 

Thanks! --Manny

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Yeah, sorry I said 'pussys', I guess it wasn't appropriate.

 

But in my defense, it would still be an insult if I called someone a 'dick', wouldn't it?

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This makes no sense

I'm saying that gendered insults go both ways, and FINE I'll never use that word again. And you'd be hard-pressed to find a person who doesn't use the word stupid.

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I'm saying that gendered insults go both ways, and FINE I'll never use that word again. And you'd be hard-pressed to find a person who doesn't use the word stupid.

Except it doesn't. 

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Except it doesn't

Any why doesn't it? It's an insult when you call someone male genitalia and it's an insult when you call someone female genitalia.

Just out of curiosity, do you all argue with people and hold them to such a standard in real life when they use these insults?  Or just on the internet?

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Any why doesn't it? It's an insult when you call someone male genitalia and it's an insult when you call someone female genitalia.

Just out of curiosity, do you all argue with people and hold them to such a standard in real life when they use these insults?  Or just on the internet?

Calling a cis-man a "dick" isn't a big deal because they aren't oppressed for being men. 

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Calling a cis-man a "dick" isn't a big deal because they aren't oppressed for being men

 

 

*cough* I'd pull out the meninism k real quick *cough* 

 

Your assumption that men aren't oppressed is part of larger notions that justifies violence against men in the status quo 

 

Their obsession with female violence perpetuates a cycle of matriarchy and violence against men. They overlook domestic and gendered violence towards men. Psychological studies indicate that women are just as capable, and perhaps even more violent in domestic abuse and violence towards men, the fact is, women are just as oppressive as men.

 Lizette Borelli 6/30/14 Lizette Borreli is a writer, particularly in the areas of gendered violence and queer theory based in New York City. She received her BA in Media Studies from CUNY Hunter College where she wrote for The Hunter Word and The Envoy.Domestic Violence Against Men: Women More Likely To Be 'Intimate Terrorists' With Controlling Behavior In Relationships” http://www.medicaldaily.com/domestic-violence-against-men-women-more-likely-be-intimate-terrorists-controlling-behavior-290662) Relationships can be an emotional rollercoaster. Throughout the ride, men and women can be everything from loving and nurturing, to sometimes verbally and even physically abusive during fights. While aggression in heterosexual relations and social interactions  is believed to stem from men, a recent study presented on June 25 at a symposium on intimate partner violence (IPV) at the British Psychological Society's Division of Forensic Psychology annual conference in Glasgow, found women are more likely to be “intimate terrorists,” or physically aggressive to their partners than men. Michael P. Johnson, an American sociologist coined the term “intimate terrorism,”  referring to batterers or abusers, in the 1990s to define an extreme form of matriarchal controlling relationship behavior involving threats, intimidation, and violence. Men were almost always responsible for these heinous acts. A constantinvocation of feminist rhetoric does nothing but silence stories of matriarchal violence on men, and allows for a cycle of hidden violence to continue. This belief is further supported by statistics highlighting nearly three in 10 women (29 percent), and one in 10 men (10 percent) in the U.S. have experienced rape, physical violence, and/or stalking by a partner, affecting some form of their functioning, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. To observe the dynamic and prevalence of intimate partner violence of men and women in heterosexual relationships, Dr. Elizabeth Bates from the University of Cumbria and colleagues from the University of Central Lancashire, conducted a survey collecting data from a large cohort of students. More than 1,000 students — 706 women and 398 men with an average age of 24 — responded to the questionnaires. The students were asked about their physical aggression and controlling behavior to partners, and to same-sex others, including friends. The findings revealed just as many women as men could also be classed as abusive, coupled with controlling behavior with serious levels of threats, intimidation, and physical violence. Women were more likely to verbally and physically aggressive to their partners than men. “This study found that women demonstrated a desire to control their partners and were more likely to use physical aggression than men. “It wasn’t just pushing and shoving,” said Bates,Medical Xpress reported. Some of the survey respondents circled boxes for things like beating up, kicking, and even threatening to use a weapon. However, when it came to terms of high levels of control and aggression, there was no difference between men and women. There was a higher prevalence of controlling behavior seen in women than men, which was found to significantly predict physical aggression in both sexes. In other words, the more controlling behavior a woman displayed, the more likely she would an “intimate terrorist,” or physically aggressive to her partner. "This was an interesting finding. Previous studies have sought to explain male violence towards women as rising from patriarchal values, which motivate men to seek to control women's behavior, using violence if necessary,” Bates said. This suggests IPV may not be motivated by patriarchal values, and should be further studied with other forms of aggression. The stereotypical popular view, although still dominant, is being challenged by research over the last ten to 15 years, shedding light on male domestic violence. Mark Brooks, chair of the ManKind Initiative in the U.K., which offers support for male victims of domestic violence, believes Bates’ study is “game changing.” “At the charity we're not surprised at the findings, because of the type of calls we get to our helpline every day,” Brooks told The Telegraph. “What concerns us still is the lack of awareness and services available to support those men suffering in this way.” It is no surprise that the media and government in the U.S. and throughout other parts of the world, people focus most attention on the female victims of domestic violence and, consequently, men are the overlooked victims of domestic violence. According to the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence, men and boys are less likely to report the violence and seek services due to several challenges such as the stigma of being a male victim. Sixteen percent of adult men who report being raped or physically assaulted are victims of a current or former spouse, cohabitating partner, boyfriend/girlfriend, or date. Source: Bates E et al. Women more likely to be aggressive than men in relationships. British Psychological Society's Division of Forensic Psychology annual conference in Glasgow.

Edited by ConsultVerminSupreme
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*cough* I'd pull out the meninism k real quick *cough* 

 

Your assumption that men aren't oppressed is part of larger notions that justifies violence against men in the status quo 

 

Their obsession with female violence perpetuates a cycle of matriarchy and violence against men. They overlook domestic and gendered violence towards men. Psychological studies indicate that women are just as capable, and perhaps even more violent in domestic abuse and violence towards men, the fact is, women are just as oppressive as men.

 Lizette Borelli 6/30/14 Lizette Borreli is a writer, particularly in the areas of gendered violence and queer theory based in New York City. She received her BA in Media Studies from CUNY Hunter College where she wrote for The Hunter Word and The Envoy.Domestic Violence Against Men: Women More Likely To Be 'Intimate Terrorists' With Controlling Behavior In Relationships” http://www.medicaldaily.com/domestic-violence-against-men-women-more-likely-be-intimate-terrorists-controlling-behavior-290662) Relationships can be an emotional rollercoaster. Throughout the ride, men and women can be everything from loving and nurturing, to sometimes verbally and even physically abusive during fights. While aggression in heterosexual relations and social interactions  is believed to stem from men, a recent study presented on June 25 at a symposium on intimate partner violence (IPV) at the British Psychological Society's Division of Forensic Psychology annual conference in Glasgow, found women are more likely to be “intimate terrorists,” or physically aggressive to their partners than men. Michael P. Johnson, an American sociologist coined the term “intimate terrorism,”  referring to batterers or abusers, in the 1990s to define an extreme form of matriarchal controlling relationship behavior involving threats, intimidation, and violence. Men were almost always responsible for these heinous acts. A constantinvocation of feminist rhetoric does nothing but silence stories of matriarchal violence on men, and allows for a cycle of hidden violence to continue. This belief is further supported by statistics highlighting nearly three in 10 women (29 percent), and one in 10 men (10 percent) in the U.S. have experienced rape, physical violence, and/or stalking by a partner, affecting some form of their functioning, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. To observe the dynamic and prevalence of intimate partner violence of men and women in heterosexual relationships, Dr. Elizabeth Bates from the University of Cumbria and colleagues from the University of Central Lancashire, conducted a survey collecting data from a large cohort of students. More than 1,000 students — 706 women and 398 men with an average age of 24 — responded to the questionnaires. The students were asked about their physical aggression and controlling behavior to partners, and to same-sex others, including friends. The findings revealed just as many women as men could also be classed as abusive, coupled with controlling behavior with serious levels of threats, intimidation, and physical violence. Women were more likely to verbally and physically aggressive to their partners than men. “This study found that women demonstrated a desire to control their partners and were more likely to use physical aggression than men. “It wasn’t just pushing and shoving,” said Bates,Medical Xpress reported. Some of the survey respondents circled boxes for things like beating up, kicking, and even threatening to use a weapon. However, when it came to terms of high levels of control and aggression, there was no difference between men and women. There was a higher prevalence of controlling behavior seen in women than men, which was found to significantly predict physical aggression in both sexes. In other words, the more controlling behavior a woman displayed, the more likely she would an “intimate terrorist,” or physically aggressive to her partner. "This was an interesting finding. Previous studies have sought to explain male violence towards women as rising from patriarchal values, which motivate men to seek to control women's behavior, using violence if necessary,” Bates said. This suggests IPV may not be motivated by patriarchal values, and should be further studied with other forms of aggression. The stereotypical popular view, although still dominant, is being challenged by research over the last ten to 15 years, shedding light on male domestic violence. Mark Brooks, chair of the ManKind Initiative in the U.K., which offers support for male victims of domestic violence, believes Bates’ study is “game changing.” “At the charity we're not surprised at the findings, because of the type of calls we get to our helpline every day,” Brooks told The Telegraph. “What concerns us still is the lack of awareness and services available to support those men suffering in this way.” It is no surprise that the media and government in the U.S. and throughout other parts of the world, people focus most attention on the female victims of domestic violence and, consequently, men are the overlooked victims of domestic violence. According to the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence, men and boys are less likely to report the violence and seek services due to several challenges such as the stigma of being a male victim. Sixteen percent of adult men who report being raped or physically assaulted are victims of a current or former spouse, cohabitating partner, boyfriend/girlfriend, or date. Source: Bates E et al. Women more likely to be aggressive than men in relationships. British Psychological Society's Division of Forensic Psychology annual conference in Glasgow.

 

Ignore the up-vote, I thought this was a joke until I read the card. 

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XD oh wow, I seriously love the stuff you all have posted here. I asked a question about spreading and it turned into a feminism debate! The irony is, I don't even use the word 'pussy' in speech, I just used it here to sound like I hate people who don't spread (like your stereotypical macho, sexist teenage boy who posts on online forums). I'm actually working on a speed bad kritik myself, but made this post to see how spreaders defended the practice. I mean, I had a feeling the 'improves memory' and 'faster thinking' were total b.s., but I just wanted to confirm this. Though I wasn't able to--from how off-topic you people got, but that serves me right for creating a fake account and probably violating the terms of use here. Thanks to Roboyle for the k!

 

--"Manny"

Edited by g55
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Except it doesn't. 

I don't think this is entirely true; men experience oppression to a degree less than that of women, but that doesn't mean we should through out the "double standards" argument out of the window. If this is truly a feminism debate then indeed the words "pussy" and "dick" are derogatory terms, female and male respectively, that ought to be taken out of peoples vocabulary entirely. Let me remind you that feminism is about equality between both genders, not so much a superiority complex over the other, or rather, a reversibility of oppression. 

 

To answer OP's question; I'd message one of the big names/rep points from cross-x about this issue (i.e. Snarf, Snark, Chaos, RainSilves, ARGogate, etc.) because they are usually more informed and/or have the evidence to share with you (with regards to those Spreading Bad K's) but be warned, unless your area is full of lay judges, most judges won't care about this type of K 

Edited by Theparanoiacmachine
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XD oh wow, I seriously love the stuff you all have posted here. I asked a question about spreading and it turned into a feminism debate! The irony is, I don't even use the word 'pussy' in speech, I just used it here to sound like I hate people who don't spread (like your stereotypical macho, sexist teenage boy who posts on online forums). I'm actually working on a speed bad kritik myself, but made this post to see how spreaders defended the practice. I mean, I had a feeling the 'improves memory' and 'faster thinking' were total b.s., but I just wanted to confirm this. Though I wasn't able to--from how off-topic you people got, but that serves me right for creating a fake account and probably violating the terms of use here. Thanks to Roboyle for the k!

 

--"Manny"

You should work on dat rhetoric first - even if it was a joke

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I think we as a community should try to help tell the person why what they're doing is bad; typically I may see someone say something gendered or ableist and just be downvoted into oblivion while being called a bunch of names, which probably definitely just causes them to leave with a sour taste in their mouth and isn't really effective. Just a pet peeve I've noticed. 

 

 

PREACH PREACH PREACH

 

Also, in the vein of being helpful, peep this scribd file I put up of a different version of Christian's file that he & I made after discussing it some in this thread

 

Ignore the up-vote, I thought this was a joke until I read the card. 

 

Well, it is a joke; the evidence is being presented ironically. Also, the card is by a woman, and the quals paint her as a "queer theorist," which is interesting (edit: read 'interesting' as 'hilariously false,' I can't find anything about this woman that would suggest that, what an utter fabrication lmao). Also I don't see anything wrong with the text of the card per se, but the tag & the way it's presented is dumb since it distracts from women's concerns (which is a contributor to its ironic nature IMO)

 

Calling a cis-man a "dick" isn't a big deal because they aren't oppressed for being men. 

 

Is that the reason we think calling people a pussy is bad though? Would it not be bad if women weren't oppressed for being women? Isn't the problem just that it's very rude and also implies that it's bad to "be" a pussy (that is, to be female)--same reason it's bad to call someone a dick? I can't really think of a reason why women being oppressed makes calling someone a pussy worse--except insofar as the phrase contributes to the devaluation of femininity (that it's bad to "be" a pussy, or female), but that's true of calling someone a dick. Except that you're right in saying that cis br0s aren't oppressed for their masculinity, but I can't think of a reason that makes it less bad to call someone a dick--it's still rude and a form of devaluing one's identity. History working out such that masculinity is better off doesn't make the devaluation of male identity less bad, that's just a contingency; it has worse consequences, maybe, but somewhere between advocating "discourse 1st" and "fem K," you lose the chance to go for "consequentialism good". But even if you didn't, it's still a bad thing to do.

 

Also I'll gender-K this entire conversation, and my preceding paragraph: it's screwed up to think that calling someone a pussy is bad because it makes it seem that it's bad to "be female"--having "female genitalia" is a janky way of conceiving of gender because it conflates sex (biological) and gender (social). I'd say that the act of presenting this objection in the first place (e.g. someone says you're a pussy, you respond "that's misogynist" or "what's wrong with being female" or otherwise making it a problem of misogyny/female oppression) is a gendered performance that aligns a certain genitalia with a certain gender--and if you're at all interested in queer/trans politics or an opponent of biological essentialism, you should object to that.

 

So what's worse, biological essentialism or allowing someone to be rude af? Who knows. (Maybe I'm just a dick.)

 

Thoughts?

Edited by dancon25
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Both "dick" and "pussy" are troublingly gendered. Saying "they're both troubling and therefore both ok" is like saying "men and women are subject to gender oppression, so it's ok".

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Here's an anti-spreading kritik I found online 

Someone fancy and handsome must have cut this

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I don't think this is entirely true; men experience oppression to a degree less than that of women, but that doesn't mean we should through out the "double standards" argument out of the window. If this is truly a feminism debate then indeed the words "pussy" and "dick" are derogatory terms, female and male respectively, that ought to be taken out of peoples vocabulary entirely. Let me remind you that feminism is about equality between both genders, not so much a superiority complex over the other, or rather, a reversibility of oppression. 

 

"pussy" is also often taken to mean "weak" and therefore is not only tied to female genitalia but stereotypes of weakness in the female gender. This is why that word is necessarily oppressive.

 

 

XD oh wow, I seriously love the stuff you all have posted here. I asked a question about spreading and it turned into a feminism debate! The irony is, I don't even use the word 'pussy' in speech, I just used it here to sound like I hate people who don't spread (like your stereotypical macho, sexist teenage boy who posts on online forums). I'm actually working on a speed bad kritik myself, but made this post to see how spreaders defended the practice.

Well surprise I guess, people who spread aren't all sexist teenage boys. It's almost as if it's not inherently bad. Good luck next year losing on your awful speed bad k and gendered language. 

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Hi, my friends and I are doing some debate work over the summer and we found out about an arg another team from our district plans to run this season. These pussys are too stupid to learn how to spread, so next year they're gonna make a 'speed bad' kritik. My team and I know about the benefits of spreading (it improves memory, helps you think faster etc) but I've had a hard time finding any articles or studies to back me up.

 

I don't need any completed evidence, but can someone point me to some sources that show the benefits of spreading? My coach told me about some studies last year but I forgot to ask for them.

 

Thanks! --Manny

wat a fukboi

 

Spelling of the f word edited for gendered language - lulz

Edited by HurderofBuffalos

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hey 

1 perm endorse the aff and we promise to never spread again. this round not key to anything. etc etc. it's pretty simple.

2 chill with the language choices. it's for everyone's sake

3 i prefer the term fÜkbody

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wat a fukboi

 

Spelling of the f word edited for gendered language - lulz

 

the fuck K is a joke and no one on this website will complain. 

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the fuck K is a joke and no one on this website will complain. 

 

 

wat a fukboi

 

Spelling of the f word edited for gendered language - lulz

The fuck K is both trans and homo phobic

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