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For those of y'all who have bids, if I want to get bids next year, how many hours should i be prepping a day? Or how many hours do y'all prep a day? Or in general?

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For those of y'all who have bids, if I want to get bids next year, how many hours should i be prepping a day? Or how many hours do y'all prep a day? Or in general?

 are you going to camp this year? where do you go to school? 

those are both determining factors for prep needed. the easy answer is to prep as much as you can, but there are definitely things such as schoolwork and fun that trump endless debate work in the end.

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For those of y'all who have bids, if I want to get bids next year, how many hours should i be prepping a day? Or how many hours do y'all prep a day? Or in general?

I don't have bids nor do I compete in such tournaments, but prepping at least one hour a day everyday (more on weekends) has improved my skills tremendously.  Debate is not a super high priority for me though, so I spend less time than maybe you would.

 

If you want to qualify to the TOC, I think 2 hours a day is a minimum.  I don't have personal experience with bids or competing in bid tournaments so don't take my word for it.  Many debaters put in 30-40 hours a week.  However, make sure to keep a good balance between school and debate- doing well in debate is not worth letting your grades slip, in my opinion.

 

There are a lot of good articles on the 3NR on how to practice, prep, and improve.  Do not just focus on research, cutting cards, and basic speaking drills.  You need to practice speaking, giving speeches, reading evidence every day if you expect to improve.

Edited by DebateSquash

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 are you going to camp this year? where do you go to school? 

those are both determining factors for prep needed. the easy answer is to prep as much as you can, but there are definitely things such as schoolwork and fun that trump endless debate work in the end.

No

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 are you going to camp this year? where do you go to school? 

those are both determining factors for prep needed. the easy answer is to prep as much as you can, but there are definitely things such as schoolwork and fun that trump endless debate work in the end.

What are these "fun" and "other things" you talk about?

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For those of y'all who have bids, if I want to get bids next year, how many hours should i be prepping a day? Or how many hours do y'all prep a day? Or in general?

Its not a question of how much you prep its about what you prep and how well you know what you prep.

 

..........Or money. 

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Its not a question of how much you prep its about what you prep and how well you know what you prep.

 

..........Or money. 

 

Nah it's pretty much how you prep. You can compensate for not being a strong technical debater by having the most, best, and best prepared (ergo well highlighted) evidence available to you. This is why super large schools who are filled with card monkey's can dominate... they just have 300 pages of politics to your 2 pages of link thumpers that allow them to just beat you on the cards. 

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If you want to qualify to the TOC, I think 2 hours a day is a minimum.  I don't have personal experience with bids or competing in bid tournaments so don't take my word for it.  Many debaters put in 30-40 hours a week. 

2 hours a day!?!? 30-40 hours a week? You certainly don't need to put in that much work to get a bid....

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Nah it's pretty much how you prep. You can compensate for not being a strong technical debater by having the most, best, and best prepared (ergo well highlighted) evidence available to you. This is why super large schools who are filled with card monkey's can dominate... they just have 300 pages of politics to your 2 pages of link thumpers that allow them to just beat you on the cards. 

 

1) Yea im not disagreeing with you.

2) When i say money i dont just mean coaches i also mean opportunities to go to toc bid tournaments and even for kids who have to pay to go to bid tourneys it still becomes cheaper and easier when coaches travel with you.

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As well to this geographic location ,like if your in  kansas its harder to go to travel tournements than a team from Chicago, where we at least have 3 in the area .

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In order to improve, you'll need to go to a debate camp to touch up on your skill and improve things that you may need to work on. Theres also a lot of lectures at camp so you should be able to learn a lot. If you are unable to go to a debate camp then you can search up online lectures for debate and listen to those in your spare time. Practice often with your teammates and ever so often have a in class debate tournament and attempt to run new things to have a  better first hand experience. Do spreading drills. Watch a lot of varsity debate videos such as michael koo's as his are pretty good, if you do that you should improve an exceeding amount depending on your work ethic and determination.

 

But remember

 

ALWAYS have fun when debating and learning, that will get you far :)

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In order to improve, you'll need to go to a debate camp to touch up on your skill and improve things that you may need to work on.

There's always something you'll need to work on, there is no "may".

Theres also a lot of lectures at camp so you should be able to learn a lot. If you are unable to go to a debate camp then you can search up online lectures for debate and listen to those in your spare time. Practice often with your teammates and ever so often have a in class debate tournament and attempt to run new things to have a  better first hand experience. Do spreading drills. Watch a lot of varsity debate videos such as michael koo's as his are pretty good, if you do that you should improve an exceeding amount depending on your work ethic and determination.

 

But remember

 

ALWAYS have fun when debating and learning, that will get you far :)

Because lord knows what else is fun.

 

But I would disagree with a few things though. #1 is that instead of watching varsity debate videos, try to debate with your varsity, though judging from the fact that you're seriously gunning for bids, I'd expect that's already pointless since you should probably be as good if not better than your varsity.

 

If you actually are in the state where you still cannot beat/tie with your varsity, I actually would not reccomend Michael Koo's debate videos. True, he did win the TOC and all but you'd want to get some of the more basic stuff down instead. One of the biggest mistakes you can make is trying to learn some kind of advanced K theory or framework when you can't explain EACH AND EVERY VOCABULARY WORD SAID, and just saying, but you don't learn those from watching online debates.

 

Also, READ READ READ READ READ READ (And if you have more time, READ). Although framework isn't a bad argument, don't think that you can always make it far up in the current meta reading just one off framework and nothing else against k affs. Although lectures are nice and all, nothing beats reading the literature itself. After the author thoroughly beats you up and reveals to you how stupid and ignorant you are, THEN you can go onto forums like these or lecture sites and rant about each and every page of that book you don't understand.

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Because lord knows what else is fun.

 

But I would disagree with a few things though. #1 is that instead of watching varsity debate videos, try to debate with your varsity, though judging from the fact that you're seriously gunning for bids, I'd expect that's already pointless since you should probably be as good if not better than your varsity.

 

If you actually are in the state where you still cannot beat/tie with your varsity, I actually would not reccomend Michael Koo's debate videos. True, he did win the TOC and all but you'd want to get some of the more basic stuff down instead. One of the biggest mistakes you can make is trying to learn some kind of advanced K theory or framework when you can't explain EACH AND EVERY VOCABULARY WORD SAID, and just saying, but you don't learn those from watching online debates.

 

Also, READ READ READ READ READ READ (And if you have more time, READ). Although framework isn't a bad argument, don't think that you can always make it far up in the current meta reading just one off framework and nothing else against k affs. Although lectures are nice and all, nothing beats reading the literature itself. After the author thoroughly beats you up and reveals to you how stupid and ignorant you are, THEN you can go onto forums like these or lecture sites and rant about each and every page of that book you don't understand.

lol what I don't think Centennial KK every really went hardcore on the critical theory debate; they were more focused on the myth of the model minority and how its intertwined with anti-blackness. And even if there was "jargon" in the earlier videos he has up, and even in the later ones actually, they do a really good job of explaining their arguments in cross examination or during the speeches themselves. What you're saying is more applicable to a team like say Caddo Magnet CM which goes straight up Baudrillard (ALMOST) every round, which requires a certain level of prior knowledge; I don't think everybody knows what the concept of "symbolic exchange", nor what "reversibility" is in relation to Baudrillard. Most of those high theory authors like to engage in serious semantic play, which gets annoying; for instance, Symbolic does not mean the same thing in Lacan as it does in Baudrillard. But back to the topic, Michael Koo himself said he didn't like any of that "high theory bullshit." 

 

I've gained a lot from watching college debates on the internet, specifically focusing on teams like Harvard BS, Northwestern MV, Oklahoma CL, Cal Berkeley MS, USC BL, etc.; and while I agree that having spars against other varsity member is better; if both of you are at the same level, then there will never be an incentive for improvement as your practice debates won't necessity that extra mile if you were going to be going up against a team like Wayzata GH. 

 

It's not like explaining the vocabulary is difficult; I think a lot of the problems arise because debaters usually cannot explain the vocabulary IN RELATION to the affirmative (i.e. the link debate) which is why judges get really annoyed about this. 

 

Westminster FG would disagree with you on that FW part; a good FW debater will,  95% of the time, beat a good K aff team (I say this because Northwestern dropped to Emporia SW at the NDT Finals in 2013). 

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lol what I don't think Centennial KK every really went hardcore on the critical theory debate; they were more focused on the myth of the model minority and how its intertwined with anti-blackness. And even if there was "jargon" in the earlier videos he has up, and even in the later ones actually, they do a really good job of explaining their arguments in cross examination or during the speeches themselves. What you're saying is more applicable to a team like say Caddo Magnet CM which goes straight up Baudrillard (ALMOST) every round, which requires a certain level of prior knowledge; I don't think everybody knows what the concept of "symbolic exchange", nor what "reversibility" is in relation to Baudrillard. Most of those high theory authors like to engage in serious semantic play, which gets annoying; for instance, Symbolic does not mean the same thing in Lacan as it does in Baudrillard. But back to the topic, Michael Koo himself said he didn't like any of that "high theory bullshit." 

 

I've gained a lot from watching college debates on the internet, specifically focusing on teams like Harvard BS, Northwestern MV, Oklahoma CL, Cal Berkeley MS, USC BL, etc.; and while I agree that having spars against other varsity member is better; if both of you are at the same level, then there will never be an incentive for improvement as your practice debates won't necessity that extra mile if you were going to be going up against a team like Wayzata GH. 

 

It's not like explaining the vocabulary is difficult; I think a lot of the problems arise because debaters usually cannot explain the vocabulary IN RELATION to the affirmative (i.e. the link debate) which is why judges get really annoyed about this. 

 

Westminster FG would disagree with you on that FW part; a good FW debater will,  95% of the time, beat a good K aff team (I say this because Northwestern dropped to Emporia SW at the NDT Finals in 2013). 

 

College resolutions are pretty interesting aren't they?

Edited by MagicalBeanie

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