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Funding card for deep sea exploration aff

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I can't find a funding card for the deep sea exploration aff and I could really use one anyone know where I can get one? All help is appreciated !!

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is this like inherency on whether or not there is funding?

No. I believe it's a funding mechanism.

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No. I believe it's a funding mechanism.

 

if it's like a part of your plan then you could just state that you fund deep sea exploration in your plan text. i don't think you need a card unless it's for like solvency on funding working or maybe inherency on whether there is funding or not

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I can't find a funding card for the deep sea exploration aff and I could really use one anyone know where I can get one? All help is appreciated !!

You mean you don't know how much your plan will cost?

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You mean you don't know how much your plan will cost?

OH GOD THE SPENDING LINKS I CAN FEEL THEM.

 

No, but seriously, http://www.infocusmagazine.org/4.1/env_ocean.html That link may help you. I understand the pain of debating in areas like that where if you don't spec literally everything the lay judge agrees with the neg.

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I'm unsure as to exactly what you're looking for friend. My partner and I ran an exploration aff once upon a time and we told people it cost around 300 million. Sadly I can't find any cards with an exact price estimation. Here is what I do have. Hope one of these is useful!

 

US has deep sea tech- just needs funding

Mclain 2012 (Craig McClain—Assistant Director of Science for the National Evolutionary Synthesis Center; Deep Sea News; “We Need an Ocean NASA NowPt.1”; http://deepseanews.com/2012/10/we-need-an-ocean-nasa-now-pt-1/; October 16th, 2012)

Our nation faces a pivotal moment in exploration of the oceans. The most remote regions of the deep oceans should be more accessible now than ever due to engineering and technological advances. What limits our exploration of the oceans is not imagination or technology but funding. We as a society started to make a choice: to deprioritize ocean exploration and science. Budget Cuts Green Road Sign image courtesy of Shutterstock In general, science in the U.S. is poorly funded; while the total number of dollars spent here is large, we only rank 6th in world in the proportion of gross domestic product invested into research. The outlook for ocean science is even bleaker. In many cases, funding of marine science and exploration, especially for the deep sea, are at historical lows. In others, funding remains stagnant, despite rising costs of equipment and personnel. The Joint Ocean Commission Initiative, a committee comprised of leading ocean scientists, policy makers, and former U.S. secretaries and congressmen, gave the grade of D- to funding of ocean science in the U.S. Recently the Obama Administration proposed to cut the National Undersea Research Program (NURP) within NOAA, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, a move supported by the Senate. In NOAA’s own words, “NOAA determined that NURP was a lower-priority function within its portfolio of research activities.” Yet, NURP is one of the main suppliers of funding and equipment for ocean exploration, including both submersibles at the Hawaiian Underwater Research Laboratory and the underwater habitat Aquarius. This cut has come despite an overall request for a 3.1% increase in funding for NOAA. Cutting NURP saves a meager $4,000,000 or 1/10 of NOAA’s budget and 1,675 times less than we spend on the Afghan war in just one month. One of the main reasons NOAA argues for cutting funding of NURP is “that other avenues of Federal funding for such activities might be pursued.” However, “other avenues” are fading as well. Some funding for ocean exploration is still available through NOAA’s Ocean Exploration Program. However, the Office of Ocean Exploration, the division that contains NURP, took the second biggest cut of all programs (-16.5%) and is down 33% since 2009. Likewise, U.S. Naval funding for basic research has also diminished. The other main source of funding for deep-sea science in the U.S. is the National Science Foundation which primarily supports biological research through the Biological Oceanography Program. Funding for science within this program remains stagnant, funding larger but fewer grants.

 

 

1.     Link turn - Ocean exploration has massive economic benefits—the sooner we explore, the sooner we can benefit from them

NOAA.gov No Date [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association “Ocean Exploration: What are the benefits” http://www.publicaffairs.noaa.gov/budget02/oar_oceanexplore.html CR]

History demonstrates that exploration results in discoveries of great value. For example, the relatively recent discovery of hydrothermal vent communities has resulted in key knowledge not only about geological processes and plate tectonics, but also about biological processes of great potential use in medicine and industry. In turn, these discoveries have shown economic potential in the range of billions of dollars. Enzymes produced by microbes found at these sites have become critical to industries that replicate DNA, new anti-inflammatory drugs are being produced from deep-sea organisms, and new knowledge will allow us to be better stewards of ocean resources.

Each trip we take to further reaches of the Earth's oceans has the potential to reveal important information about the origin of life on earth, or new living or non-living resources that may have tremendous potential to improve the quality of life on earth. The sooner we take the step of seriously addressing our lack of understanding of how ocean processes affect life on land, the sooner we will be able to realize the scientific and economic payoffs applicable to a wide variety of societal issues. Ocean Exploration presents possibilities for new solutions to
problems we face as we move into the 21st century.

Dedicated funding is key to deep ocean exploration. There is a laundry list of benefits that can be achieved, but funding is necessary.

Jackson, 2012 [Keith Jackson, Project Management Institute, 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea,  June 1, 2012, http://www.readperiodicals.com/201206/2703629061.html]

Though Mr. Cameron's adventure was part publicity stunt, it also highlighted a growing number of projects aimed at creating the infrastructure to investigate the deepest parts of the oceans. The reasons for the renewed interest dive into hot issues: new research on earthquakes and climate change. But not all the projects have such a high-profile sponsor as Mr. Cameron, who lined up backers such as National Geographic and luxury marketer Rolex for his endeavor. Because deep-sea exploration projects don't necessarily have an immediate (Return on Investment) ROI, most organizations are left scrambling for funding leaving many questions unanswered. "I'm sad to say that here we are at the beginning of the 21st century, and we know more about other parts of the solar system than we do our own ocean," says oceanographer Sylvia Earle, PhD, founder of DOER Marine, an Alameda, California, USA-based marine technology company, and explorer in residence at the National Geographic Society. "We have better maps of the moon. Mars and Jupiter than we do of our own ocean floor." The quest for better information about what lies beneath is motivated by more than mere curiosity. Researchers believe there are more than 20 trenches similar to the Mariana, and that these seismically active zones could be a factor in sparking earthquakes.The deep sea may also play a bigger role in the carbon cycle—and therefore in regulating the Earth's climate—than was previously thought. As organic matter from dead flora and fauna sinks to the bottom of the sea, it's trapped by the steep walls of the trench. Because of this, more carbon accumulates at the bottom of trenches than in other parts of the ocean. The value of that type of information helps project teams make the case for deep-sea exploration—now more than ever. "It's a competition against time because of what humans are doing to the ocean and the need for more deepsea research," says DOER Marine's president and CEO Liz Taylor. Deep-dive vessels also could help in disaster-relief efforts. "During the BP oil spill, a manned submersible would've been extremely useful in going down and possibly helping fix the problem sooner or gathering more information," Ms. Taylor explains.

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You don't need a card for funding because if you are just passing a plan it won't cost anybody anything, but depending on what the plan is the people your plan effects may have to give up some rights.

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