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reptece

Blocks

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I've watched a lot of videos of college students debating and I see them reading off their computers for some and reading off the flow for some. I know they are blocks but I'm not really sure how to write blocks. Like I know they are suppose to be preempted arguments (maybe not) but I'm confused about them. How do you structure a block and how do you make it generic? Because I know everyone answers arguments differently with different wordings so I'm not really sure how to make enough blocks to even cover them sufficently.

****I'm talking about blocks from in the rebuttals, not the constructive speeches********** Thanks for reading, I'll make use of any advice you give ^_^

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If they're reading off their computer, they probably hit the same argument before, and in the same way it was run, so they made pre-made rebuttal blocks against it 

 

If they're going off their flow, then that probably means that what the negative ran was an entirely new argument, which they haven't hit before (this can either be a new off-case position, or a new analytical argument, or a card), so they had to go off their flows 

 

I honestly think rebuttals off the flows SHOULD be the way in which people give rebuttals since it shows knowledge on the topic being debated, but that's just me 

Edited by Theparanoiacmachine
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Most people don't prewrite rebuttals. They usually do them off the flow. The most one should do for blocks is have a super generic overview of the args. You can pre write blocks for rebuttals, but only as practice, as the way arguments interact every round usually changes

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I write blocks, but I don't read them- it seems weird to try to make an analytical argument by reading a pre-written paragraph verbatim.  Blocks (written immediately after a round when the ideas are fresh in your mind) are good because it helps to get your thoughts and arguments on paper and will help you address the argument more concisely and confidently in a round.

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