Jump to content
Kirito

The Spread Defense

Recommended Posts

An explanation of why I am making this thread in "Culture": Spread or Speed has become a norm in top tier debate. As with all norms, they became such for a reason. That reason is the evolution of practices. I believe this qualifies this thread as a post on Culture.

 

On to the bulk of the post.

 

Debate is an intellectual game. As a player of this game I see obvious reasons behind why speed is good. Most of these reasons have to do with the ability to delve further into the depths of an argument and to test its "truth value" with a higher precision. However, most everyone who does not debate or know how to speed see it as blasphemy. The level of their hatred to my hallowed ability burns with the passion of a thousand suns. This became most apparent to me last night, as my father heard me listening to a college round on my laptop and, as a lawyer, he took the time out of his life to express his displeasure of my partaking in this activity (not debate, but rather speed). I responded by telling him that the faster you go, the more information you can use and your level of analysis increases.

 

To the point. Many people criticize speed. I am curious to see how everyone else defends it. I am not looking for arguments for my own purposes, rather I'm interested to learn how it is seen in the eyes of other debaters.

Edited by Kirito

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Eh at the top level I don't think anyone gains an advantage from speed because it's a skill that can be practiced. At lower levels I think it's a bit more negative. I feel like not allowing novices to spread would be an OK idea because it's rather unimportant as far as actual debate skills go and people become discouraged when they lose rounds because they simply got spread out. It kind of twists peoples perceptions to think debate is all about who can talk the fastest when debate is really a game of efficiency. As far as "real world" benefits of spreading being able to analyze rapidly and think critically about a large breadth of information is an extremely valuable skill. 

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Slow debate puts me to sleep

As someone who has participated in largely slow debate for the last 4 years I disagree with this so much. Slow debate is much more performance based. Making metaphors and jokes and in general being more entertaining makes it fun. Slow debate is what you make of it and if you spend all your time wishing it was a fast round then you aren't going to enjoy it. If you concentrate on doing what you can with what you got slow debate becomes a fun event.

  • Upvote 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Don't you know? Spreading speed is directly correlated with penis size!

"Yeah," he said slowly, "Inversely correlated." 

Edited by Snarf
  • Upvote 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Necro-bump, but w/e
 
 

Spreading is capitalist and biopolitical  

Bifo 09 (Franco Berardi, “Precarious Rhapsody: Semiocapitalism and the pathologies of the post-alpha generation,” Minor Compositions, London 2009)//AD

In ‘Learner based listening and technological authenticity,’ Richard Robin, a researcher from George Washington University, studies the effect of the acceleration of speech on listening comprehension. Robin’s research is based on a calculation of the number of syllables spoken each second. A faster rate, and more syllables per second decrease the level of the listener’s comprehension of meaning: the faster the flow of syllables per second, the less the time for the listener to critically process the message. The speed of emission and the amount of semiotic impulses sent in a given time unit are functional to the time available to a conscious processing. Fast speech intimidates listeners. Evidence suggests that globalization has produced faster speech emission rates in areas of the world where the Western mode of transmission of signs has come to replace traditional and authoritarian ones. For instance, in the ex-Soviet Union the speed of transmission measured in syllables per second has almost doubled since the fall of the communist regime: from three to almost six syllables per second; similar findings reached the same conclusions in the Middle East and China (1991: 403). The implications of Robin’s study are extremely interesting for our understanding of the transition from a form of authoritarian biopolitical power that is persuasive (like the totalitarian regimes of the twentieth century) to a form of biopolitical power that is pervasive (like contemporary infocracy). Persuasive power is founded on consensus: citizens must understand the reasons of the President, General, Secretary or Duce. Only one source of information is authorized. Dissident voices are subjected to censorship. Instead, the infocratic regime of semio-capital grounds its power on overload, the acceleration of semiotic flows and the proliferation of sources of information to the point of the producing the white noise of indistinctiveness, irrelevance and indecipherability. Twentieth century art was conceived as flows of desire and liberating expressions; Surrealism celebrated the expressive power of the subconscious as liberating social and psychic energies. Today, art is also the flow of therapy for mind ecology. Art has replaced the police in the universal dispositif of mind control, but at the same time it looks for inroads into therapy.

  • Upvote 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Necro-bump, but w/e

 

 

Spreading is capitalist and biopolitical  

Bifo 09 (Franco Berardi, “Precarious Rhapsody: Semiocapitalism and the pathologies of the post-alpha generation,” Minor Compositions, London 2009)//AD

In ‘Learner based listening and technological authenticity,’ Richard Robin, a researcher from George Washington University, studies the effect of the acceleration of speech on listening comprehension. Robin’s research is based on a calculation of the number of syllables spoken each second. A faster rate, and more syllables per second decrease the level of the listener’s comprehension of meaning: the faster the flow of syllables per second, the less the time for the listener to critically process the message. The speed of emission and the amount of semiotic impulses sent in a given time unit are functional to the time available to a conscious processing. Fast speech intimidates listeners. Evidence suggests that globalization has produced faster speech emission rates in areas of the world where the Western mode of transmission of signs has come to replace traditional and authoritarian ones. For instance, in the ex-Soviet Union the speed of transmission measured in syllables per second has almost doubled since the fall of the communist regime: from three to almost six syllables per second; similar findings reached the same conclusions in the Middle East and China (1991: 403). The implications of Robin’s study are extremely interesting for our understanding of the transition from a form of authoritarian biopolitical power that is persuasive (like the totalitarian regimes of the twentieth century) to a form of biopolitical power that is pervasive (like contemporary infocracy). Persuasive power is founded on consensus: citizens must understand the reasons of the President, General, Secretary or Duce. Only one source of information is authorized. Dissident voices are subjected to censorship. Instead, the infocratic regime of semio-capital grounds its power on overload, the acceleration of semiotic flows and the proliferation of sources of information to the point of the producing the white noise of indistinctiveness, irrelevance and indecipherability. Twentieth century art was conceived as flows of desire and liberating expressions; Surrealism celebrated the expressive power of the subconscious as liberating social and psychic energies. Today, art is also the flow of therapy for mind ecology. Art has replaced the police in the universal dispositif of mind control, but at the same time it looks for inroads into therapy.

wait wut 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Necro-bump, but w/e

 

 

 

Spreading is capitalist and biopolitical

 

 

Bifo 09 (Franco Berardi, “Precarious Rhapsody: Semiocapitalism and the pathologies of the post-alpha generation,” Minor Compositions, London 2009)//AD

In ‘Learner based listening and technological authenticity,’ Richard Robin, a researcher from George Washington University, studies the effect of the acceleration of speech on listening comprehension. Robin’s research is based on a calculation of the number of syllables spoken each second. A faster rate, and more syllables per second decrease the level of the listener’s comprehension of meaning: the faster the flow of syllables per second, the less the time for the listener to critically process the message. The speed of emission and the amount of semiotic impulses sent in a given time unit are functional to the time available to a conscious processing. Fast speech intimidates listeners. Evidence suggests that globalization has produced faster speech emission rates in areas of the world where the Western mode of transmission of signs has come to replace traditional and authoritarian ones. For instance, in the ex-Soviet Union the speed of transmission measured in syllables per second has almost doubled since the fall of the communist regime: from three to almost six syllables per second; similar findings reached the same conclusions in the Middle East and China (1991: 403). The implications of Robin’s study are extremely interesting for our understanding of the transition from a form of authoritarian biopolitical power that is persuasive (like the totalitarian regimes of the twentieth century) to a form of biopolitical power that is pervasive (like contemporary infocracy). Persuasive power is founded on consensus: citizens must understand the reasons of the President, General, Secretary or Duce. Only one source of information is authorized. Dissident voices are subjected to censorship. Instead, the infocratic regime of semio-capital grounds its power on overload, the acceleration of semiotic flows and the proliferation of sources of information to the point of the producing the white noise of indistinctiveness, irrelevance and indecipherability. Twentieth century art was conceived as flows of desire and liberating expressions; Surrealism celebrated the expressive power of the subconscious as liberating social and psychic energies. Today, art is also the flow of therapy for mind ecology. Art has replaced the police in the universal dispositif of mind control, but at the same time it looks for inroads into therapy.

This actually just became my favorite card
  • Upvote 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Necro-bump, but w/e

 

 

Spreading is capitalist and biopolitical  

Bifo 09 (Franco Berardi, “Precarious Rhapsody: Semiocapitalism and the pathologies of the post-alpha generation,” Minor Compositions, London 2009)//AD

In ‘Learner based listening and technological authenticity,’ Richard Robin, a researcher from George Washington University, studies the effect of the acceleration of speech on listening comprehension. Robin’s research is based on a calculation of the number of syllables spoken each second. A faster rate, and more syllables per second decrease the level of the listener’s comprehension of meaning: the faster the flow of syllables per second, the less the time for the listener to critically process the message. The speed of emission and the amount of semiotic impulses sent in a given time unit are functional to the time available to a conscious processing. Fast speech intimidates listeners. Evidence suggests that globalization has produced faster speech emission rates in areas of the world where the Western mode of transmission of signs has come to replace traditional and authoritarian ones. For instance, in the ex-Soviet Union the speed of transmission measured in syllables per second has almost doubled since the fall of the communist regime: from three to almost six syllables per second; similar findings reached the same conclusions in the Middle East and China (1991: 403). The implications of Robin’s study are extremely interesting for our understanding of the transition from a form of authoritarian biopolitical power that is persuasive (like the totalitarian regimes of the twentieth century) to a form of biopolitical power that is pervasive (like contemporary infocracy). Persuasive power is founded on consensus: citizens must understand the reasons of the President, General, Secretary or Duce. Only one source of information is authorized. Dissident voices are subjected to censorship. Instead, the infocratic regime of semio-capital grounds its power on overload, the acceleration of semiotic flows and the proliferation of sources of information to the point of the producing the white noise of indistinctiveness, irrelevance and indecipherability. Twentieth century art was conceived as flows of desire and liberating expressions; Surrealism celebrated the expressive power of the subconscious as liberating social and psychic energies. Today, art is also the flow of therapy for mind ecology. Art has replaced the police in the universal dispositif of mind control, but at the same time it looks for inroads into therapy.

Bifo in '(Insert year of publication here) is the answer to everything (It used to be Baudrillard) 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd argue that card actually means it's important to be able to not get overwhelmed by information. That is a skill spreading helps teach.

  • Upvote 1
  • Downvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd argue that card actually means it's important to be able to not get overwhelmed by information. That is a skill spreading helps teach.

Not really..."the infocratic regime of semio-capital grounds its power on overload."

 

Although you can win it's important to not get overwhelmed by information, it doesn't get you out of the link because the card is specific to the rapid succession of syllables and words and how they're used in the biopolitical regime of semio-capital, as capital, and no longer as a means of authentic communication

Edited by Theparanoiacmachine

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I suppose that's a viable argument if you can win that your alternative will stop information overload from existing. But I don't think that's something likely to happen.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I suppose that's a viable argument if you can win that your alternative will stop information overload from existing. But I don't think that's something likely to happen.

If Bifo is right and the state is going to present information at a rapid pace and bases its power on overload, a strategy of spread could generate skills to counteract the state. If the aff (assuming sides) wins Wight or some other card that institutions are inevitable and the alt can't do anything about it, then this becomes offense for the aff. 

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If Bifo is right and the state is going to present information at a rapid pace and bases its power on overload, a strategy of spread could generate skills to counteract the state. If the aff (assuming sides) wins Wight or some other card that institutions are inevitable and the alt can't do anything about it, then this becomes offense for the aff.

 

The State is not inevitable, nor is true unless you concede it as such (tautology at its finest)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The State is not inevitable, nor is true unless you concede it as such (tautology at its finest)

If the aff wins state/inst inevitable then this argument becomes a clear link turn

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Necro-bump, but w/e

 

 

Spreading is capitalist and biopolitical  

Bifo 09 (Franco Berardi, “Precarious Rhapsody: Semiocapitalism and the pathologies of the post-alpha generation,” Minor Compositions, London 2009)//AD

In ‘Learner based listening and technological authenticity,’ Richard Robin, a researcher from George Washington University, studies the effect of the acceleration of speech on listening comprehension. Robin’s research is based on a calculation of the number of syllables spoken each second. A faster rate, and more syllables per second decrease the level of the listener’s comprehension of meaning: the faster the flow of syllables per second, the less the time for the listener to critically process the message. The speed of emission and the amount of semiotic impulses sent in a given time unit are functional to the time available to a conscious processing. Fast speech intimidates listeners. Evidence suggests that globalization has produced faster speech emission rates in areas of the world where the Western mode of transmission of signs has come to replace traditional and authoritarian ones. For instance, in the ex-Soviet Union the speed of transmission measured in syllables per second has almost doubled since the fall of the communist regime: from three to almost six syllables per second; similar findings reached the same conclusions in the Middle East and China (1991: 403). The implications of Robin’s study are extremely interesting for our understanding of the transition from a form of authoritarian biopolitical power that is persuasive (like the totalitarian regimes of the twentieth century) to a form of biopolitical power that is pervasive (like contemporary infocracy). Persuasive power is founded on consensus: citizens must understand the reasons of the President, General, Secretary or Duce. Only one source of information is authorized. Dissident voices are subjected to censorship. Instead, the infocratic regime of semio-capital grounds its power on overload, the acceleration of semiotic flows and the proliferation of sources of information to the point of the producing the white noise of indistinctiveness, irrelevance and indecipherability. Twentieth century art was conceived as flows of desire and liberating expressions; Surrealism celebrated the expressive power of the subconscious as liberating social and psychic energies. Today, art is also the flow of therapy for mind ecology. Art has replaced the police in the universal dispositif of mind control, but at the same time it looks for inroads into therapy.

I'm waiting for the day someone spreads through this card

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm waiting for the day someone spreads through this card

"We were forced to spread because the 1AC went fast, that's the link to the speed bad k" -- team that spread the 1NC without going to case while reading a speed bad link to their "exclusion" K (which was a bunch of irrelevant Butler cards)

  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

×
×
  • Create New...