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What does it mean to perm the Neg

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I was reading over the Pirates Aff that is on Openev, and saw that it has several cards that 'perm the neg', What does this mean and when would I use them

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Which camps pirate aff, there's supposed to be several. If it's the GTown DnG pirates aff, it's because DnG pretty much either turn everything or don't substantially link making most neg arguments perm-able

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Yeah, it's just because most neg arguments won't compete w/ DnG + DnG are all about fluid advocacies so that's all perm the neg means, they probably also say "perm the negs' x " argument" in round

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wow, those perm cards are *awful*. the whole "here's a cool woman/black pirate" thing is the same logic as "I have a black friend", and doesn't even claim to speak to the value of a pirate ontology (which is different than actual pirates...) or the relationship between pirate ontology and Black/feminized/queer bodies. 

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Sorry, but if you could explain that a little more that would be great. The way that I read the  cards are that pirates offered good stuff to certain groups and thus there is no link and pirates are sexy mofos.

 

Perm: The neg should become pirates.  We specifically present the narrative of Zheng Shi, the Chinese female pirate who is arguably the coolest and influential pirate of all time.

Szczepanski No Date (Kallie Szczepanski, Historian, “Zheng Shi, Pirate Lady of China” http://asianhistory.about.com/od/modernchina/p/Zheng-Shi-Pirate-China.htm)CEFS

The most successful pirate in history was not Blackbeard (Edward Teach) or Barbarossa, but Zheng Shi or Ching Shih of China. She acquired great wealth, ruled the South China Seas, and best of all, survived to enjoy the spoils. We know next to nothing about Zheng Shi's early life. In fact, "Zheng Shi" means simply "widow Zheng" - we don't even know her birth name. She was likely born in 1775, but the other details of her childhood are lost to history. Zheng Shi's Marriage: She first enters the historical record in 1801. The beautiful young woman was working as a prostitute in a Canton brothel when she was captured by pirates. Zheng Yi, a famous pirate fleet admiral, claimed the captive to be his wife. She pluckily agreed to marry the pirate leader only if certain conditions were met. She would be an equal partner in leadership of the pirate fleet, and half the admiral's share of the plunder would be hers. Zheng Shi must have been extremely beautiful and persuasive, because Zheng Yi agreed to these terms. Over the next six years, the Zhengs built a powerful coalition of Cantonese pirate fleets. Their combined force consisted of six color-coded fleets, with their own "Red Flag Fleet" in the lead. Subsidiary fleets included the Black, White, Blue, Yellow, and Green. In April of 1804, the Zhengs instituted a blockade of the Portuguese trading port at Macau. Portugal sent a battle squadron against the pirate armada, but the Zhengs promptly defeated the Portuguese. Britain intervened, but did not dare take on the full might of the pirates - the British Royal Navy simply began providing naval escorts for British and allied shipping in the area. On November 16, 1807, Zheng Yi died in Vietnam, which was in the throes of the Tay Son Rebellion. At the time of his death, his fleet is estimated to have included 400 to 1200 ships, depending upon the source, and 50,000 to 70,000 pirates. As soon as her husband died, Zheng Shi began calling in favors and consolidating her position as the head of the pirate coalition. She was able, through political acumen and willpower, to bring all of her husband's pirate fleets to heel. Together they controlled the trade routes and fishing rights all along the coasts of Guangdong, China and Vietnam. Zheng Shi, Pirate Lord: Zheng Shi was as ruthless with her own men as she was with captives. She instituted a strict code of conduct, and enforced it strictly. All goods and money seized as booty was presented to the fleet and registered before being redistributed. The capturing ship received 20% of the loot, and the rest went into a collective fund for the entire fleet. Anyone who withheld plunder faced whipping; repeat offenders or those who concealed large amounts would be beheaded. A former captive herself, Zheng Shi also had very strict rules about treatment of female prisoners. Pirates could take beautiful captives as their wives or concubines, but they had to remain faithful to them and take care of them - unfaithful husbands would be beheaded. Likewise, any pirate who raped a captive was executed. Ugly women were to be released unharmed and free of charge on shore. Pirates who deserted their ship would be pursued, and if found, had their ears cut off. The same fate awaited any who went absent without leave, and the earless culprits would then be paraded in front of the entire squadron. Using this code of conduct, Zheng Shi built a pirate empire in the South China Sea that is unrivaled in history for its reach, fearsomeness, communal spirit, and wealth. In 1806, the Qing dynasty decided to do something about Zheng Shi and her pirate empire. They sent an armada to fight the pirates, but Zheng Shi's ships quickly sank 63 of the government's naval ships, sending the rest packing. Both Britain and Portugal declined to directly intervene against "The Terror of the South China Seas." Zheng Shi had humbled the navies of three world powers.

 

 

Blackness Perm: the neg should become pirates.  Historically, piracy offered a chance of freedom for escaped slaves in the 18th century

Do or die 99 Do or die, anarchist journal, “Pirate Utopias: Under the Banner of King Death” 1999. http://www.eco-action.org/dod/no8/pirate.html ES

However, not all pirates participated in the slave trade. Indeed large numbers of pirates were ex-slaves; there was a much higher proportion of blacks on pirate ships than on merchant or naval vessels, and only rarely did the observers who noted their presence refer to them as 'slaves'. Most of these black pirates would have been runaway slaves, either joining with the pirates on the course of the voyage from Africa, deserting from the plantation, or sent as slaves to work on board ship. Some may have been free men, like the "free Negro" seaman from Deptford who in 1721 led "a Mutiney that we had too many Officers, and that the work was too hard, and what not." Seafaring in general offered more autonomy to blacks than life on the plantation, but piracy in particular, could - although it was a risk – offer[ed] one of the few chances at freedom for an African in the 18th century Atlantic. For example, a quarter of the two-hundred strong crew of Captain Bellamy's ship the Whydah were black, and eyewitness accounts of the sinking of the pirate vessel off Wellfleet, Massachusetts in 1717 report that many of the corpses washed up were black. Pirate historian Kenneth Kinkor argues that although the Whydah was originally a slave ship, the blacks on board at the time of the sinking were members of the crew, not slaves. Partially because pirates, along with other tars, "entertain'd so contemptible a Notion of Landsmen," a black man who knew the ropes was more likely to win respect than a landsman who didn't. Kinkor notes: "Pirates judged Africans more on the basis of their language and sailing skills - in other words, on their level of cultural attainment - than on their race."(24) 

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wow, those perm cards are *awful*. the whole "here's a cool woman/black pirate" thing is the same logic as "I have a black friend", and doesn't even claim to speak to the value of a pirate ontology (which is different than actual pirates...) or the relationship between pirate ontology and Black/feminized/queer bodies. 

Wait you mean me having a black friend doesn't stop me from being racist? 

 

/sarcasm

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Sorry, but if you could explain that a little more that would be great. The way that I read the cards are that pirates offered good stuff to certain groups and thus there is no link and pirates are sexy mofos.

 

Im a lot more qualified to talk about the gender card than the Blackness card so I'll stick to the former and let you get the idea.

 

The affirmative's invocation of "pirates" is not about specific historical pirates, but about the idea of pirating as a concept. If the 1nc read "Blackbeard was a rapist" links the 2ac would correctly answer that one pirate is unrepresentative of the political movement of pirating in general.

 

The 1AC instead invokes a conceptual model pirate based which conforms with their advantage set (specifically being untethered, without destination and without a specific mission). Their advantages stem from this metaphorical pirate and the benefits of modeling the traits it possesses (ie similarly untethering from the state). The 1AC's benefits don't stem from actual pirating (their advantages aren't constrained to naval behaviors) but do come from emulating the traits of the conceptual pirate.

 

It should be clearer now why invoking a single historical pirate is unresponsive.

 

One historical pirate (good or bad) is unrepresentative to the conceptual pirate invokes in the 1AC.

 

Second, the advantages don't come from pirating but from emulating pirate fluidity.

 

Third, the card might start to make inroads if the aff argued that pirating generally has a symbolic association with sex equality such that thinking about metaphoric priates necessitates thinking about eliminating gender subordination (much the same way "pirate" has symbolic association with "ocean" and "boat"). Two problems with that - first, the card doesn't try to make that argument and second, the opposite is true. Rape and gender subordination are par for the symbolic pirate course.

 

The 2AC - read most generously - seems to suggest reading the one story about a female pirate starts to reterritorialize those symbolic connections. That answer is unavailing because it smacks of tokenism. One single woman leader in the course of pirating history does not mean pirating generally is/was friendly to women. "We've got a girl now we're sex equal!" Is token logic.

 

Moreover the card's text supports the link turn in two ways - first, it says her arrangement was extremely uncommon rather than the norm. Second, it reinforces the notion that women are erased from pirating history - who had heard of this woman? Everyone knows Blackbeard and Captain Jack Sparrow. If this woman was truly the best pirate, her absence from dominant retellings of pirate history suggests that pirate history is generally not friendy to women.

 

That said - the card doesn't even attempt to make a symbolic association type argument - it's tag and highlighting are tantamount to "here's a cool woman are we friends yet?" I'm sure there are better cards out there to cut.

Edited by Snarf
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I don't know, this card does talk about how she was captured by a pirate and forced to be his wife, if that doesn't scream gender equality, I don't know what does.

 

The second card says "However, not all pirates participated in the slave trade." Which does imply that some if not most pirates participated in the slave trade.

 

Which would probably give a team running these arguments a STRONG new link

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Yeah; "the best female example was raped into it and they only traded soooooooooome slaves" 2AC

 

no bueno

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\

Do or die 99 Do or die, anarchist journal, “Pirate Utopias: Under the Banner of King Death” 1999. http://www.eco-action.org/dod/no8/pirate.html ES

However, not all pirates participated in the slave trade. Indeed large numbers of pirates were ex-slaves; there was a much higher proportion of blacks on pirate ships than on merchant or naval vessels, and only rarely did the observers who noted their presence refer to them as 'slaves'. Most of these black pirates would have been runaway slaves, either joining with the pirates on the course of the voyage from Africa, deserting from the plantation, or sent as slaves to work on board ship. Some may have been free men, like the "free Negro" seaman from Deptford who in 1721 led "a Mutiney that we had too many Officers, and that the work was too hard, and what not." Seafaring in general offered more autonomy to blacks than life on the plantation, but piracy in particular, could - although it was a risk – offer[ed] one of the few chances at freedom for an African in the 18th century Atlantic. For example, a quarter of the two-hundred strong crew of Captain Bellamy's ship the Whydah were black, and eyewitness accounts of the sinking of the pirate vessel off Wellfleet, Massachusetts in 1717 report that many of the corpses washed up were black. Pirate historian Kenneth Kinkor argues that although the Whydah was originally a slave ship, the blacks on board at the time of the sinking were members of the crew, not slaves. Partially because pirates, along with other tars, "entertain'd so contemptible a Notion of Landsmen," a black man who knew the ropes was more likely to win respect than a landsman who didn't. Kinkor notes: "Pirates judged Africans more on the basis of their language and sailing skills - in other words, on their level of cultural attainment - than on their race."(24)

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Yeah; "the best female example was raped into it and they only traded soooooooooome slaves" 2AC

 

no bueno

 

Depending on how willing you are to impact turn rape and slavery that could be a solid 2ac

 

/sarcasm

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