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Warming Turns

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I'm pretty sure this is in the wrong forum, but I didn't know where to put it and I didn't want it to be in the "Everyone should make a warming 1ac" 

Anyways, besides for russian oil turn, coral reef turn, ice age turn, and co2 fertilization turn, are there other warming turns? 

If so, what do they say?

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I'm assuming this is the right forum; it's about an advantage that's likely to be used a lot with the topic specifically, and its always helpful to keep a topic in context when you're considering negative arguments.

 

I've glanced through a couple articles stating how the fabled Northwest Passage, a formerly nonexistent route from East to West North America within the arctic ocean that explorers had searched for centuries to find, has become nearly navigable due to the melting of arctic ice (which is likely a result of global warming).  Environmentalists obviously write about this as a concern, but in an economic perspective, the opening of this passage would be a godsend as it would allow for faster and more direct routes across arctic trade.  Probably not the strongest of turns considering the literature that climate change Affs are likely going to be using, but it appears fairly intuitive within an ocean topic.  If used in tandem with the environmental turns you mentioned, it could be worthwhile to look into.

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Climate change will reduce shipping costs

Attavanich et. al 11 [Witsanu Attavanich,* Ph.D. Candidate Bruce A. McCarl Distinguished and Regents Professor Stephen W. Fuller Regents Professor Dmitry V. Vedenov Associate Professor Zafarbek Ahmedov Ph.D. Candidate Department of Agricultural Economics, Texas A&M University, College Station Selected Paper prepared for presentation at the Agricultural & Applied Economics Association’s 2011 AAEA & NAREA Joint Annual Meeting

July 24-26, “The Effect of Climate Change on Transportation Flows and Inland Waterways Due to Climate-Induced Shifts in Crop Production Patterns” http://ageconsearch.umn.edu/bitstream/109241/2/AAEASelectedPaper_The%20Effect%20of%20Climate%20Change%20on%20Transportation%20Flows_13247.pdf]

 

Several studies find that watersheds supplying water to the Great Lakes–St. Lawrence River system are likely to experience drier conditions, resulting in lower water levels and reduced capacity to ship agricultural and other bulk commodities, and hence increase costs of inland waterway transport (Millerd 2005; Millerd 2011; Chao 1999; Easterling and Karl 2001). Millerd (2005) find that predicted lowering of Great Lakes water levels would result in an estimated increase in Canadian shipping costs between 13 and 29 percent by 2050. The impacts vary between commodities and routes. For grains, the annual average shipping cost shipped from upper lakes to St. Lawrence River is simulated to increase about 11 percent in 2050 compared to shipping cost in 2001. For the US, Millerd (2011) projected the increase in the US vessel operating costs of grains and agricultural products exported from the Great Lakes, which is slightly lower than the Canadian vessel operating costs. They reveal that the US vessel operating 12 costs of grains and agricultural products range from 4.15-4.95, 7.96-9.30, and 21.71-22.62 percent by 2030, 2050, and under doubling CO2 scenario, respectively. However, many studies found that warming temperatures are likely to result in more ice-free ports, improved access to ports, and longer shipping seasons, which could offset some of the resulting adverse economic effects from increased shipping costs. Based on the above studies, all of them mostly focus on the direct influence of climate change on transportation sector especially transportation infrastructures and costs; however no one focuses on the indirect effect of climate change on this sector through climate induced changes in agriculture.

 

On a serious note, agricultural productivity K2 preventing food crises is one I've seen a lot, although open to turns

CO2 increases crop yields – major step in averting hunger

Idso, Carter and Singer 2011 [Craig D. Ph.D Chairman for the Center for the Study of Carbon Dioxide and Global Change, Robert M. Ph.D Adjunct Research Fellow James Cook University, S. Fred Ph.D President of Science and Environmental Policy Project, Climate Change  Reconsidered  2011 Interim Report” Nongovernmental International Panel on Climate Change http://nipccreport.org/reports/2011/pdf/2011NIPCCinterimreport.pdf

Rising temperatures and atmospheric CO2  concentrations, by increasing crop yields, will play   a major role in averting hunger without the taking   of new land and water from nature. For a nominal   doubling of the air‘s CO2 concentration, for   example, the productivity of Earth‘s herbaceous   plants rises by 30 to 50 percent and the productivity   of its woody plants rises by 50 to 80 percent or   more. In addition, atmospheric CO2 enrichment   typically increases plant nutrient and water use   efficiency.

 

BUT

Food crisis is severe.

Caroline Henshaw, staff writer at the Wall Street Journal, May 31, 2011, “Feeding the World’s Hungry Is a Moral Necessity–Oxfam,” The Wall Street Journal, http://blogs.wsj.com/source/2011/05/31/feeding-the-worlds-hungry-is-a-moral-necessity-oxfam/?mod=google_news_blog

In his The Annals of the Roman People, the historian Livy famously regarded the glorification of chefs as the sign of a culture in decline. “What had been nothing but a métier was elevated to an art,” he wrote, claiming that such “foreign luxury” heralded a degradation of morality and the decay of empire. Today, Oxfam has taken that argument a step further. In a new report, the international charity argues that the excesses of the rich are tipping the world into a permanent state of food crisis so severe that it could reverse the trajectory of human development. Bloomberg It warns that prices of staple foods will more than double in the next 20 years unless world leaders act now to avert climate change and reform the global food system. Importantly, the cost of key grains such as maize—an essential dietary component in the world’s least-developed continent, Africa—could rise by as much as 180%, with more than half of this rise due to the degrading effects of climate change. Other factors, including rising oil prices, the increasing diversion of crops for biofuels and scarcity of water are also expected to make the forecast 70% rise in production needed by 2050 to feed the world’s population even harder to meet.The international community is sleepwalking into an unprecedented and avoidable human development reversal,” said Oxfam’s report, Growing a Better Future. Rising food prices have already been blamed for triggering the wave of unrest which has swept the Arab world this year. With crops in Europe and the U.S. now facing severe threats from the weather, the United Nations warns that world food prices—already near record highs—could rise even further. In response, Oxfam said world leaders must act to ensure the world’s bust does not become a new boon for business. Speculation in agricultural derivatives markets must be regulated and the activities of huge grain trading companies, which it characterizes as “global oligopolies,” must be made more transparent. Policies subsidizing biofuels should also be scrapped and instead the money should be ploughed into boosting food reserves and investing in smallholder farmers in the world’s most impoverished countries. This must be done in a sustainable way which limits agriculture’s contribution to the release of greenhouse gases. None of these recommendations is new. Since the last food-price spike of 2007-08, policymakers and farmers alike have been wrestling with how to improve production and G20 leaders have made food security a priority this year. But the apocalyptic tone struck by Oxfam’s report shows an increasing urgency in the pleas of the international aid community for change, as the cost of feeding an ever-growing number of hungry mouths rises despite ever-growing world agricultural production. Addressing the needs of the world’s hungry is not only necessary; it will be the deciding factor in our own moral trajectory. As the UN’s special rapporteur, Olivier de Schutter, says: “The question of global hunger [is] not one of production only, but also one of marginalization, deepening inequalities and social justice.”

 

There's also Bio-D turns.

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