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That's just how geo from Bronx Law described in the group chat.

 

I think Oklahoma read this vs northwestern, saying the ability to not be topical is a manifestation of whiteness.

Centennial read a version saying they needed state bad links, and whether or not the state was good is an important discussion (at least, that's what I got from 1nc and CX, I didn't see how they developed it in the block)

 

Oh, they meant 'only white people have to be topical', not 'talking about whiteness has to be topical for it to be okay'? Ick.

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Is there a link to any of the cards or cites read for this argument? I didn't get to watch any of the TOC outrounds yesterday.

Edited by dancon25

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just looking at the oklahoma cites it seams like the link is a lack of an advocacy statement. i haven't had a chance to watch the finals round of the TOC yet, but poly had an advocacy right?

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It's basically framework where the limits standard uses Race literature about how fluidity is whiteness.

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[insinuating that there is a potential discussion of the implications of Centennial appropriating this argument and I would like to have someone provide their perspective]

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Personally, I think that they are as much a part of this so-called "whiteness" as can be seen by their choice to be non-topical or topical, and their choice to create an aff (Asian Advocacy) speicifcally to answer wilderson, and then read wilderson on the negative.

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Personally, I think that they are as much a part of this so-called "whiteness" as can be seen by their choice to be non-topical or topical, and their choice to create an aff (Asian Advocacy) speicifcally to answer wilderson, and then read wilderson on the negative.

Answering wilderson is whiteness?

 

Not trying to be snide, just wondering what you mean.

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Answering wilderson is whiteness?

 

Not trying to be snide, just wondering what you mean.

Reading wilderson and then arguing against it at other times is a disembodied perspective- it's whiteness to be able to step in and out of positions like that. I think that a dude whose last name is Wise wrote about this

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I think Capitol debate is an institution of whiteness and actively produces the type of "spectacularization of black suffering" that some of their teams criticize, especially when they are mass taught to run the "Race K" (Crenshaw link of omission plus prewritten blocks) and only to go for it when it is mishandled (quoted from a capitol debater). I am not one for Wilderson's sweeping generalizations about non-white races (which definitely whitewashes the violence non-black people of color experience), but even as a Middle Eastern person I know it is naive to assume that brown and yellow people aren't able to experience whiteness. The Capitol model is one defined by whiteness, and specifically how Centennial chooses to run a policy aff when it's strategic and Asian Conscientiization when it is strategic and then Wilderson when it is strategic is having the reflexive orientation to the state that Wilderson and most of the ev they read argues is problematic. Obviously I understand that debate is ultimately a game and people will have to do what is strategic, like I run Wilderson on occasion even though I disagree with him, but something erks me about the absolute reduction of Wilderson's argument to debate economy for the exact reason that the K says, it commodifies and spectacularizes the suffering of blackness for the purpose of white people to win debates, especially in a world where said teams have no problem switching over to a policy heg aff is it would give them the ballot. This would be less of an issue for me if I haven't seen Capitol make these arguments at the expense of the Baltimore UDL and other inner city Maryland schools (who are predominately black), who ran anti-racism arguments because of the reasons that DSRB says, this is their only method of argumentation available to them and their personal experience, but they were crowded out by Capitol teams who read these arguments as strategy and had the resources/coaching to outtech those teams to the point of non-existance.

 

I'm mostly providing some rambling thoughts on this, I have no serious opinion or stance towards the people of Centennial or Capitol debate, but rather considering the implications of this type of debate engagement.

Edited by Ganondorf901
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First, I think that while you can say that Capitol is something of a 'debate factory' wrt race arguments I don't think you can extend that to any specific debater; KK in particular seems to have worked with Daryl Burch and invested a lot of time and energy into developing their race arguments. On another level, I don't know how different this is from Lexington mass teaching the politics disad.

My understanding is that Asian conscientization does mix with Wilderson. I haven't really looked into the street T but I know that they run black FW with asian conscientization quite often on the neg. The argument there seems to be that the myth of the model minority sustains anti-blackness, that non-black people can posit how successful Asian-Americans are (even without affirmative action, they'll say), and use that as justification to avoid any real change.  

I haven't devoted much real effort or thought to your final point about strategically running arguments, but it's something that's irked me for a while. I guess on one hand, you have the argument that it's important for teams with a message to win rounds, and for some rounds you need to run a policy aff. the problem i have with your argument is that you're focused on the appearances of the message; i.e. how it's formed and presented. I don't disagree that the location from which people speak is important. But in terms of raising awareness of the issues about which they debate, I don't think it's necessarily bad that Centennial has found success with the argument. It's not a zero-sum game; perhaps Centennial success means less success for BUDL schools, but it doesn't mean that only one or the other can succeed.

 

I'm not affiliated with Capitol/Centennial if that's important.

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My understanding is that Asian conscientization does mix with Wilderson. I haven't really looked into the street T but I know that they run black FW with asian conscientization quite often on the neg. The argument there seems to be that the myth of the model minority sustains anti-blackness, that non-black people can posit how successful Asian-Americans are (even without affirmative action, they'll say), and use that as justification to avoid any real change.  

Although I take issue with more of your post, this is the section that I mostly take issue with. Centennial worked with Daryl Burch on the Asian Concientization affirmative pretty much as an answer to Wilderson based arguments, largely as a critique of the race binary. Wilderson is an extremely essentializing literature base, which is where a lot of it's strategic value comes from, but is also why it does not "mix" with Asian conscientization. Honestly, those arguments may very well be polar opposites.

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