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Discourse Solves

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I am looking for a card about discourse solving in general or objectivist discourse discourse solves*not sure if it exists) or something about how objectivism solves.

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Opotow 01 [susan. Associate Editor of Peace and Conflict: Journal of Peace Psychology and Past President of the Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues. “Chapter 8: Social Injusticeâ€] Accessible <http://academic.marion.ohio-state.edu/dchristie/Peace%20Psychology%20Book_files/Chapter%208%20-%20Social%20Injustice%20(Opotow).pdf>

Fostering inclusionary thinking can be accomplished by1. Welcoming open dialogue and critique. Change and resource scarcity are a fact of social life, but they increase the sense of threat and danger and consequently narrow the scope of justice (Opotow, 1990). Therefore, tolerance for and encouragement of discussion and critique is a first step in recognizing structural violence and identifying its causes and cures. Supporting open dialogue and valuing pluralistic perspectives not only can help us identify unfair and divisive procedures for distributing social resources, but can also help social groups (e.g., political entities, citizen organizations) develop sufficient flexibility to withstand the stresses of social change and conflict (Coser, 1956).

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Like this maybe?

 

Reality is a discursive construct – our understanding of the world is shaped by the way we describe it

Chia, 2k – Robert, University of Essex (“Discourse Analysis as Organizational Analysis,†Organization, Vol. 7, No. 3, 200, http://geocities.ws/visisto/Biblioteca/Chia_Discourse.pdf)RK

The question of discourse, and the manner in which it shapes our epistemology and understanding of organization, are central to an expanded realm of organizational analysis. It is one which recognizes that the modern world we live in and the social artefacts we rely upon to successfully negotiate our way through life, are always already institutionalized effects of primary organizational impulses. Social objects and phenomena such as ‘the organization’, ‘the economy’, ‘the market’ or even ‘stakeholders’ or ‘the weather’, do not have a straightforward and unproblematic existence independent of our discursively-shaped understandings. Instead, they have to be forcibly carved out of the undifferentiated flux of raw experience and conceptually fixed and labelled so that they can become the common currency for communicational exchanges. Modern social reality, with its all-too-familiar features, has to be continually constructed and sustained through such aggregative discursive acts of reality-construction. The idea that reality, as we know it, is socially constructed, has become an accepted truth. What is less commonly understood is how this reality gets constructed in the first place and what sustains it. For the philosopher William James, our social reality is always already an abstraction. Our lifeworld is an undifferentiated flux of fleeting sense-impressions and it is out of this brute aboriginal flux of lived experience that attention carves out and conception names: . . . in the sky ‘constellations’, on earth ‘beach’, ‘sea’, ‘cliff’, ‘bushes’, ‘grass’. Out of time we cut ‘days’ and ‘nights’, ‘summers’ and ‘winters’. We say what each part of the sensible continuum is, and all these abstract whats are concepts. (James, 1948: 50, emphasis original) It is through this process of differentiating, fixing, naming, labelling, classifying and relating—all intrinsic processes of discursive organization—that social reality is systematically constructed. Discourse, as multitudinal and heterogeneous forms of material inscriptions or verbal utterances occurring in space–time, is what aggregatively produces a particular version of social reality to the exclusion of other possible worlds. It is therefore inappropriate to think of ‘organizational discourse’, for instance, as discourse about some pre-existing, thing-like social object called ‘the organization’. To do so is to commit what the mathematician-turned-philosopher Alfred North Whitehead (1926/1985) called the ‘Fallacy of Misplaced Concreteness’ (p. 64) whereby our socially constructed conceptions of reality are unreflexively mistaken for reality itself.

 

Discourse determines policy outcomes

Detraz and Betsill, 08 - *Nicole, Ph.D. Candidate in Political Science at Colorado State University, and **Michele M., Associate Professor of Political Science at Colorado State University (“Climate Change and Environmental Security: For Whom the Discourse Shifts,†Paper Presented At The 49th Annual Meeting Of The International Studies Association, 3/26/08, http://citation.allacademic.com//meta/p_mla_apa_research_citation/2/5/2/5/9/pages252596/p252596-1.php)RK

A discourse-analytic approach is appropriate in that discourses are powerful forces within policy debates. Discourses can be thought of as “specific ensembles of ideas, concepts and categorization that are produced, reproduced and transformed in a particular set of practices and through which meaning is given to physical and social realities†(Hajer 1995: 45). This definition suggests that discourses typically involve agency, meaning that individuals can actively shape discourses. It also suggests that discourses are constantly-evolving entities that can be shaped over time. Additionally, examining discourses can shed light on various power relations within an issue area. We can understand power relations as struggles “over interests, which are exercised, reflected, maintained and resisted through a variety of modalities, extents and degrees of explicitness†(Lazar 2005: 9). For example, dominant discourses are those that are most likely to be in line with the interests of powerful factions of society. It is unlikely that a discourse that is not in the interest of the powerful will actually be used in policy debates on salient issues. We can use discourse analysis to understand which discourses have made it to the level of policymaking for an issue like environmental change, and what this means for both the powerful and less-powerful in society. Litfin (1999) argues that discourses play an important role in shaping which policies are likely to emerge for a given issue area. According to Haas (2002: 1), Discourses impart meaning to an ambiguous policy domain. Discourses are important because they institutionalize cognitive frames. They identify issues as problems, set agendas, and define the salient aspects of issues as problems for decision-makers. Each discourse or perspective rests on different assumptions, goals and values… and suggests different policy solutions. They have the effect of defining provocations or crises. As this suggests, the use of one discourse over another has important implications, both theoretically and practically.

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I am looking for a card about discourse solving in general or objectivist discourse discourse solves*not sure if it exists) or something about how objectivism solves.

You say objectivism & your sig is Ayn Rand-  do you mean generic "discourse focus good" cards, or specifically cards for a Rand/Objectivism/Coercion argument?

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Either Or

I am writing a kritikal affirmative for next years topic and it is based on using objectivist discourse to solve. I already have cards cut (from Rand) saying discourse is real, and that for reality or the concrete to exist there must first be abstract discourse, but now I just need either or.

Edited by pronk

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Either Or

I am writing a kritikal affirmative for next years topic and it is based on using objectivist discourse to solve. I already have cards cut (from Rand) saying discourse is real, and that for reality or the concrete to exist there must first be abstract discourse, but now I just need either or.

gross.

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I'm not totally sure what you're asking about, but if you want cards about empirical data good or scientific method good, I highly recommend cutting from Karl Popper.  (Popper is more general about his understanding of 'science' than the current scientific disciplines.  He criticizes a number of theories for failing to be scientific that are well outside the normal realm of science - one gets the impression that he thinks all worthwhile ideas should be scientifically formulated - that is, make predictions which could potentially be falsified).

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Either Or

I am writing a kritikal affirmative for next years topic and it is based on using objectivist discourse to solve. I already have cards cut (from Rand) saying discourse is real, and that for reality or the concrete to exist there must first be abstract discourse, but now I just need either or.

Solves for what, exactly? And, well, from an objectivist standpoint that's just wrong. Objectivist metaphysics holds that reality exists independent of human cognition:

 

"To grasp the axiom that existence exists, means to grasp the fact that nature, i.e., the universe as a whole, cannot be created or annihilated, that it cannot come into or go out of existence. Whether its basic constituent elements are atoms, or subatomic particles, or some yet undiscovered forms of energy, it is not ruled by a consciousness or by will or by chance, but by the Law of Identity. All the countless forms, motions, combinations and dissolutions of elements within the universe--from a floating speck of dust to the formation if a galaxy to the emergence of life--are caused and determined by the identities of the elements involved. Nature is the metaphysically given--i.e., the nature of nature is outside the power of any volition." Rand, "The Metaphysical Versus the Man-Made," in Philosophy: Who Needs It?

 

Objectivist arguments require very precise terminology, so you need to explain exactly what you're talking about to find the right card.

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