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glg1995

Borders K

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Will trade a lot for a really good well blocked out Borders K

HAHAHAHHAHAHHA... NO!

 

Actually, it is pretty good,  but still. Michigan has a really good one on open evidence, I'll find and post the link later. 

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I'm really looking for 2 pieces of evidence:

 

A borders k link to a critical mexico aff.  

 

and a card about how the border re-inscribes whiteness 

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borders are good though, otherwise there will be a lot of illegal immigrants. this kritik is just crazy talk

1) They wouldn't be illegal immigrants without a border/border mindset.

2) That's not true; there's evidence of that people actually move back home after relaxing/opening borders.

3) The southern border is a failure anyway, the only thing that it does is kill some of the people trying to get into the US.

4) Immigrants are a net benefit for the country.

 

I get the feeling you'e trolling judging from posts like this across multiple sub-forums.

 

Edit: if you're looking for cards, you can dig through the open borders case here: 

http://www.cross-x.com/topic/56807-case-release/

It's organized for aff but it should still work.

Edited by SnarkosaurusRex

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I think I know what aff you're talking about and personally, I think a state PIC solves all of their offense. 

 

None of their solvency is predicated off of policy passage and so long as you bind them to the USFG, then you win the debate

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Pretty sure this what you're lookin for

 

Western critical studies often create boundaries and exclusion of other areas of studies which fails to include people and studies with intersecting ideas, creating academic borders.

 

Donadey, ‘7 (Anne, Department of European Studies and Women’s Studies at San Diego State University, “Overlapping and Interlocking Frames for Humanities Literature Studies: Assia Djebar, Tsitsi Dangarembga, Gloria Anzaldua,†College Literature, Fall, Volume: 34(4), p. 25. DAP)

 

Several thought-provoking comparative models along the lines that I am interested in have recently been proffered. The first scholar to propose radical intersections between U.S. Third World feminist, postcolonial, and post-structuralist theory has been Chicana theorist Chela Sandoval. In her long-awaited Methodology of the Oppressed, she argues that it is crucial to map out “permeable boundar[ies]†(2000, 130), points of intersection and divergence between cognate, yet separate fields that are all motivated by what she calls “an ethically democratic imperative†lest we be faced with constantly having to reinvent the wheel (112). For example, Sandoval focuses on the permeable boundary between two thinkers who are rarely discussed together, theorist of decolonization Frantz Fanon and French structuralist Roland Barthes, proposing “a new kind of interfacing: the ability to tell another story, a differing version, facing the degree of difference between versions, while recognizing a function that recurs in spite of all disparities . . . . The methodology of the oppressed is that interfacing . . . a neorhetoric of love in the post-modern world . . . as a means of social change†(130) which “operates differentially.†This “coalitional consciousness†must be able to shift to recognize the similarities and the differences between fields of study (131). Sandoval demonstrates how Fanon and Barthes can be traced as possible precursors to feminist theory and ethnic studies. She highlights the necessity of mapping out these fluid intersections in order to avoid the danger of one field appropriating and denying the insights of another, as Barthes and “much academic work in the West†unfortunately do (132). A major difference that Sandoval foregrounds between Barthes and U.S.Third World feminism is that whereas Barthes felt alienated by the mixture of oppositionality and complicity that his theory of semiology entailed, U.S. Third World feminism embraces this mixture as “a necessary standpoint for ensur ing survival and social evolution†(133).

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