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I understand the general premise of Automatic Exchange of Info/Trade Transparency Units, but are there tiny internal mechanisms that I should know before facing this affirmative? What are some good off-case arguments against the case that are effective and case-specific?

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I'm a big fan of inherency 

 

The U.S. already added Mexico to the Automatic exchange agreement=

Thompson and Knight ’12—U.S. Law firm(Thompson and Knight. "THE U.S. AND MEXICO SIGN AN INTERGOVERNMENTAL AGREEMENT TO SIMPLIFY FATCA COMPLIANCE." Thompson and Knight. N.p., 12 Dec. 2012. Web. 29 Jan. 2014. <http://www.tklaw.com/files/Publication/8623329f-1689-4efb-845b-afa664cb9c73/Presentation/publicationattachment/95aa75ec-cf46-477e-a2c5-b5e9830a20b6/tkclientalert_usmexicosignagreementonfatcacompliance.pdf>.) JO

In an effort to minimize administrative and legal obstacles arising under FATCA, on November 19, 2012, the U.S. and Mexico entered into an intergovernmental agreement (the “IGAâ€), which provides for an annual automatic exchange of information regarding financial accounts. This IGA permits Mexican financial institutions to comply with FATCA by reporting information to the Mexican government rather than to the U.S. directly. To effectuate the terms of the IGA, each country will automatically exchange information about individual accounts and entity accounts held by residents of the other country as of December 31, 2013, and annually thereafter. The information automatically exchanged includes: • Name, address, and taxpayer identification number of the account holder; • Average monthly account balance (in currency equivalents); • Account number; • Name and identifying number of the financial institution; • The gross amount of interest and dividends paid or credited to the account; and • The gross amount of proceeds from sale of property. 

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AEI is a stupid solvency mechanism for the case, because it is indeed inherent. TTU's are better but there is no solvency advocate that says the number of TTU's in Mexico needs to be increased. The best solvency mechanism for this aff is the TCO Finance Working Group, which compiles all current anti-money laundering initiatives. 

Solvency Advocate:

A working group to combine all anti-money laundering efforts is necessary for the US and Mexico.

Celina Realuyo, President, CBR Global Advisors, May 2012

 

(CBR is an international strategic consulting firm, also affiliated with: Assistant Professor of National Security Affairs, Center for Hemispheric Defense Studies, National Defense University and former U.S. State Department Director of Counterterrorism Finance Program, graduate of Georgetown University’s School of Foreign Service and holds an M.B.A. from Harvard Business School, M.A. from Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies, writing for Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, a highly recognized think tank, ranked among the top fifteen in the world, “It’s All about the Money: Advancing Anti-Money Laundering Efforts in the U.S. and Mexico to Combat Transnational Organized Crimeâ€, http://www.wilsoncenter.org/sites/default/files/Realuyo_U.S.-Mexico_Money_Laundering_0.pdf)

 

First, both the U.S. and Mexico must demonstrate the political will and continued resolve to confront TCOs and focus on their finances. To combat TCOs, we must strike at the heart of their operations – their money. While anti-money laundering investigations are complex and cannot be captured by videotape like a law enforcement raid on a suspected trafficker’s safe house, “following the money trail†often times leads law enforcement to TCO leadership or their financial facilitators, and disrupting TCO money laundering operations increase the cost of doing business. Many bilateral anti-money laundering initiatives are underway in the U.S. and Mexico as described above, but these activities and authorities are often dispersed amongst various governmental agencies making coordination more difficult. In this context, the U.S. and Mexico should establish a coordinating mechanism such as a bi-national TCO Finance Working Group that would enable the governments to consolidate information on all anti-money laundering initiatives and investigations underway on both sides of the border. Such a measure could enhance interagency and bilateral cooperation and help evaluate the successes or shortcomings of anti-money laundering efforts in combating transnational organized crime.

 

Moreover, while both the U.S. and Mexico have the requisite legal authority and institutions in place to fight money laundering, they must dedicate adequate human and financial capital to more successfully pursue TCO financing. There have been indications that more staff will be added to anti-money laundering agencies in the U.S. and Mexico, but actions speak louder than words. 

Edited by USMessi

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