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anthro k aff HAAAALP

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Hey guys, 

I want to make an anthro k aff with a deep ecology advocacy. The way that I'm framing it, I'm just going to advocate deep ecology, which is arguably really untopical. Which arguments (and kritiks) will I need to block out, and how do I respond to T(I really need help with how to respond to T)? If it helps, I'm saying that the epistemology of anthro is wrong, and that causes social and environmental crises, and that deep ecology, which at its most basic level is a shift in  epistemology, will solve for all of these problems.  

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Hey guys, 

I want to make an anthro k aff with a deep ecology advocacy. The way that I'm framing it, I'm just going to advocate deep ecology, which is arguably really untopical. Which arguments (and kritiks) will I need to block out, and how do I respond to T(I really need help with how to respond to T)? If it helps, I'm saying that the epistemology of anthro is wrong, and that causes social and environmental crises, and that deep ecology, which at its most basic level is a shift in  epistemology, will solve for all of these problems.  

 

Run a topical aff. Considering "save the sea turtles" is a consult CP on this topic I suspect you can make a borderline topical aff to save them or something. I know for a fact that if aid is T (and it likely is) than you can send aid for animal repopulation projects or something. 

 

Or you could go hardcore, throw deep ecology out and do ecofem with an environmental advantage and a patriarchy advantage. 

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Assuming I do the topical aff plan for 1 specific country, how do I access the epistemology impacts? How does supporting animals/nature in 1 instance in one country change anthropocentric modes of thought on a substantive level? 

 

I wanted to go hardcore(unless there is a reason not to do so), and I already have many of the cards for deep ecology cut out, how would I respond to T and which arguments would I need to block out? 

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Assuming I do the topical aff plan for 1 specific country, how do I access the epistemology impacts? How does supporting animals/nature in 1 instance in one country change anthropocentric modes of thought on a substantive level? 

 

I wanted to go hardcore(unless there is a reason not to do so), and I already have many of the cards for deep ecology cut out, how would I respond to T and which arguments would I need to block out? 

if you are going to be this untopical, then you are going to want to have a framework frontline very specific to your advocacy. You also want to use your epistemology arguments to turn the t arguments that people will run against you. 

 

the most important thing though is to some how tie your aff to something to do with a topic country/latin america specifically. if you just have a random deep ecology aff with no topic connection, you will be hard pressed to get any judge to vote for you

Edited by agl125
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You can make arguments about T=censorship if you want to kritik it. Stuff like this (although you should get something specific to Anthro):

 

The act of deciding who gets the right to speak stifles debate. The terminal impact of this type of thought is that debate robbed of its educational potential.

Paulo Friere- Director of the Department of Education and Culture of the Social Service in the state of Pernambuco (that’s in Brazil), Director; Department of Cultural Extension of Recife University, Visiting Professorship; Harvard- (Pedagogy of the Oppressed, Chapter 1, educator and director of the Department of Cultural  Extension of Recife University,1970)

Dialogue is the encounter between men, mediated by the world, in order to name the world. Hence, dialogue cannot occur between those who want to name the world and those who do not wish this  naming — between those who deny others the right to speak their word and those whose right to speak  has been denied them. Those who have been denied their primordial right to speak their word must first reclaim this right and prevent the continuation of this dehumanizing aggression. If it is in speaking their word that people, by naming the world, transform it dialogue imposes itself as the way by which they achieve significance as human beings. Dialogue is thus an existential necessity. And since  dialogue is the encounter in which the united reflection and action of the dialoguers are addressed to  the world which is to be transformed and humanized, this dialogue cannot be reduced to the act of one  person’s “depositing†ideas in another; nor can it become a simple exchange of ideas to be “consumed† by the discussants.

 

Our form of critical education is necessary for young people such as ourselves to engage in the world as responsible citizens working for the betterment of a global society.

Henry Giroux in a Jan. 20th2013 interview with José María Barroso Tristán:, accessible here (http://www.globaleducationmagazine.com/critical-interview-henry-giroux/)

The first step would be to see education as a crucial foundation for creating the agents necessary to live in, govern, and struggle for a radical democracy. Another task would be to recognize how education and pedagogy [is] are connected to and implicated in the production not only of specific agents, a particular view of the present and future, but also [and] how knowledge, values and desires, and social relations are always implicated in power. Education as a democratic project always presupposes a vision of the future in its introduction to, preparation for, and legitimation of particular forms of social life. It is utopian in its goal of expanding and deepening the ideological and material conditions that make a democracy possible. As a moral and political practice, education produces the modes of literacy, critique, sense of social responsibility, and civic courage necessary to imbue young people with the knowledge and skills needed to enable them to be engaged critical citizens willing to fight for a sustainable and just society.

JMBT: Global Education Magazine promotes an educationally-conscious social reality and strives to eliminate the tremendous inequalities in the world. Do you have any advice for us in these missions?

HG: First, it must be acknowledged that such inequalities undermine every aspect of democratization and that education plays a crucial role in any viable politics willing to confront such global inequities. Second, the problems facing us today are global and not merely local. Power is global and politics is local. That must change. We need a new language for understanding new global power formations as well as new international modes of politics to fight them. Social movements must move outside of national boundaries and join with others across the globe to fight the savagery of neoliberal global politics and central to such a task is the work of intellectuals, artists, cultural workers, and other educators who can fashion new tools and social movements in the fight against the current anti-democratic threats being imposed all over the globe in the name of austerity and market driven values. Finally, we need a language that is both critical and hopeful, a language of critique and possibility.

Edited by Atlas0Smirked

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You can make arguments about T=censorship if you want to kritik it. Stuff like this (although you should get something specific to Anthro):

 

The act of deciding who gets the right to speak stifles debate. The terminal impact of this type of thought is that debate robbed of its educational potential.

Paulo Friere- Director of the Department of Education and Culture of the Social Service in the state of Pernambuco (that’s in Brazil), Director; Department of Cultural Extension of Recife University, Visiting Professorship; Harvard- (Pedagogy of the Oppressed, Chapter 1, educator and director of the Department of Cultural  Extension of Recife University,1970)

Dialogue is the encounter between men, mediated by the world, in order to name the world. Hence, dialogue cannot occur between those who want to name the world and those who do not wish this  naming — between those who deny others the right to speak their word and those whose right to speak  has been denied them. Those who have been denied their primordial right to speak their word must first reclaim this right and prevent the continuation of this dehumanizing aggression. If it is in speaking their word that people, by naming the world, transform it dialogue imposes itself as the way by which they achieve significance as human beings. Dialogue is thus an existential necessity. And since  dialogue is the encounter in which the united reflection and action of the dialoguers are addressed to  the world which is to be transformed and humanized, this dialogue cannot be reduced to the act of one  person’s “depositing†ideas in another; nor can it become a simple exchange of ideas to be “consumed† by the discussants.

 

Our form of critical education is necessary for young people such as ourselves to engage in the world as responsible citizens working for the betterment of a global society.

Henry Giroux in a Jan. 20th2013 interview with José María Barroso Tristán:, accessible here (http://www.globaleducationmagazine.com/critical-interview-henry-giroux/)

The first step would be to see education as a crucial foundation for creating the agents necessary to live in, govern, and struggle for a radical democracy. Another task would be to recognize how education and pedagogy [is] are connected to and implicated in the production not only of specific agents, a particular view of the present and future, but also [and] how knowledge, values and desires, and social relations are always implicated in power. Education as a democratic project always presupposes a vision of the future in its introduction to, preparation for, and legitimation of particular forms of social life. It is utopian in its goal of expanding and deepening the ideological and material conditions that make a democracy possible. As a moral and political practice, education produces the modes of literacy, critique, sense of social responsibility, and civic courage necessary to imbue young people with the knowledge and skills needed to enable them to be engaged critical citizens willing to fight for a sustainable and just society.

JMBT: Global Education Magazine promotes an educationally-conscious social reality and strives to eliminate the tremendous inequalities in the world. Do you have any advice for us in these missions?

HG: First, it must be acknowledged that such inequalities undermine every aspect of democratization and that education plays a crucial role in any viable politics willing to confront such global inequities. Second, the problems facing us today are global and not merely local. Power is global and politics is local. That must change. We need a new language for understanding new global power formations as well as new international modes of politics to fight them. Social movements must move outside of national boundaries and join with others across the globe to fight the savagery of neoliberal global politics and central to such a task is the work of intellectuals, artists, cultural workers, and other educators who can fashion new tools and social movements in the fight against the current anti-democratic threats being imposed all over the globe in the name of austerity and market driven values. Finally, we need a language that is both critical and hopeful, a language of critique and possibility.

I wouldn't use those.  Friere/Giroux and critical pedagogy in general is very anthropocentric.  There's an article tagged Bell and Russell 2k that could be a good link card.  , http://www.csse-scee.ca/CJE/Articles/FullText/CJE25-3/CJE25-3-bell.pdf

Edited by KimJongUn
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So is this where the mao K becomes a counter K to any k of T? I'm so ready to outleft a K team so hard that I start defending possibly the man with the largest k/d ratio in history. 

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I don't know if you're ignoring the topic or not, but if you do you'll need T as well as f/w blocks. There's a better abuse story as well as ground for an education arg/Eurocentrism k (ignoring topic countries means you don't care)

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I wouldn't use those.  Friere/Giroux and critical pedagogy in general is very anthropocentric.  There's an article tagged Bell and Russell 2k that could be a good link card.  , http://www.csse-scee.ca/CJE/Articles/FullText/CJE25-3/CJE25-3-bell.pdf

I wouldn't use them either. That's why I said find something anthro specific and provided those as an example of what k's of T can look like.

Edited by Atlas0Smirked

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I wouldn't use them either. That's why I said find something anthro specific and provided those as an example of what k's of T can look like.

Yeah, no offense intended, I didn't think you meant it like 'oh use this' but 'this is an example'.  Just, I like the cards I cut from that article and thought it could be of some use for anyone running anthro.

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