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morganevinrude

mexico nanotech

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There are definitely not good internal links on this aff and I would recommend you look for a different aff. My team was cutting this and ditched a months work of work because the internal links just weren't there.

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If you go for the disease/poverty aspect you should find some solid cards on that. The problem is finding stuff on Co-Op.

 

And, Nanotech in Latin America is critical – Saves thousands of lives and provides the best laboratories for development of disease prevention techniques

 

VOA News 2k9

(“Nanotechnology Could Improve Health Care in Developing Countries,†pg online @ http://www.voanews.com/articleprintview/347615.html //um-ef)

Scientists say nanotechnology, which involves some of the smallest things on earth, could have a big impact in developing countries. And some of the biggest benefits could come in improving health. Nanotechnology refers to the ability to manipulate materials on the nanometer scale. How small is that? A nanometer is one-billionth of a meter - something like the length of a line,10 atoms long. That's hard to grasp, so nanotech scientist Andrew Maynard explains it with an analogy. If you can imagine a child the size of the Moon, "a tennis ball will be something like 50 nanometers in diameter. Or the head of a pin will be one nanometer in diameter. So the difference in scale, going from human scale to the nanoscale, is the equivalent of taking the moon and putting the head of a pin on the moon." Maynard is chief scientist at the Project on Emerging Nanotechnologies, part of the Woodrow Wilson Center in Washington. At a recent symposium, he said researchers have been using nanotechnology to create products like cosmetics and stain resistant clothing. But some of the most promising uses of nanotechnology are in the health field. In sub-Saharan Africa each year, malaria kills a million children under the age of five. A big part of the malaria challenge is correctly diagnosing patients. Often, anti-malaria drugs are given without a proper diagnosis, to people who may not have malaria. That's not only wasteful, it contributes to drug resistance. Peter Singer of the University of Toronto says a nanotechnology called quantum dots could make it much easier to correctly diagnose malaria, instead of using the traditional method of examining a patient's blood under a microscope. "The bottom line," says Singer, "is that changing the infrastructure from moderate infrastructure like microscopes, to minimal infrastructure, like the quantum dots I was showing you, saves hundreds of thousands of lives for malaria. So this is a serious public health issue at stake, just from a diagnostic." In addition to better diagnostics, nanotechnology could also help in treating disease. For example, as Piotr Grodzinski of the U.S. National Cancer Institute points out, it could help make existing medicines more effective. "You can develop techniques which allow [doctors] to deliver the therapeutic drug or therapeutic treatment locally to the tumor site, and in many cases use much lower dose of the drug, and by that means cause lower side effects." Advances in nanotechnology are coming out of labs in the usual advanced countries. But scientists in developing and emerging countries - China, India and Brazil, for example - are also involved. However, as program moderator Jeff Spieler of the U.S. Agency for International Development cautioned, it's still a big step getting those innovations to some of the world's poorest people. "This to some extent will depend on how many of the new innovations will actually be coming from the laboratories of less developed countries," said Spieler, "and then what is the likelihood of that these advances, even in those laboratories, will find their way into the indigenous populations of those countries and not be picked up by somebody else?" Although nanotech experts stress the potential benefits from the new technology, they also concede that there are risks involved in working with these new nano materials. Andrew Maynard of the Woodrow Wilson Center acknowledged the uncertainties. "If you look at the very simplest case of nanometer-size particles, we know they behave differently in the body and in the environment [compared] to larger, more conventional particles," Maynard explained. "So yes, there are going to be a whole new set of risk issues we need to address, and that's going to require quite a substantial investment in new science to understand what those risks are, but also how to translate and transform that information into effective and safe ways of using the technologies." Among those at risk could be workers involved in manufacturing new nano-scale materials, as well as consumers, such as those taking nano-based medicines.

 

 

Status quo virus prevention fails—nanotechnology completely eradicates disease

 

Merta 10

(E. Merta, University of New Mexico School of Law, Health Sciences Library, “THE NANOTECHNOLOGY AGENDA:¶ MOLECULAR MACHINES AND SOCIAL TRANSFORMATION¶ IN THE 21st CENTURYâ€, 3/22/2010, http://www.checs.net/checs_00/presentations/nanotech.htm//VS)

Nanotechnology researchers like Freitas and Eric Drexler, founder of the field, envision other medical applications of their work. They call for nanomachines that could serve as dispensers of important biochemicals that are lacking in some individuals, for example. Nano-scale devices implanted in a human body might dispense insulin to diabetics or neurotransmitters (the chemicals that serve as the basis of brain function) to victims of Alzheimer’s disease.[19] Nanorobots in the body could serve a wide array of other functions. They could enter arteries and remove fat deposits clogging the cardiovascular system. They could function as artificial red blood cells, delivering additional oxygen to body tissues and increasing gas exchange in the lungs. A human body with these devices implanted could hold its breath underwater for hours at a time or run 15 minutes without taking a breath. [20]¶ Nanorobots could also serve as artificial immune devices, attacking the viruses and bacteria that cause so many human health problems. Their onboard computers could be programmed to seek out and destroy the plaque causing tooth decay, the virus causing AIDS, or the tumors associated with cancer. They could do so with far deadlier accuracy than any drug or other treatment option available today, because they would do something today�s methods can�t. Drug molecules and radiation particles presently used to treat disease are “dumbâ€; they bounce around the body randomly until they hit a disease organism, frequently failing to kill that organism or killing healthy, benign cells instead. Anti-disease nanomachines, in contrast, would be “smart†devices, able to recognize specific microbes or cells and then target them for destruction with close to absolute, one hundred percent precision. That precision would allow them to avoid damage to healthy body tissues. It’s the difference between a howitzer shell that kills indiscriminately and a high powered rifle with a telescopic sight that kills only a specific target. [21]¶ The �holy grail� of nanomedicine is to construct general purpose cell repair nanomachines. Thousands of them would be stationed at each of the body�s 100 trillion or so cells. Their onboard computers would hold databases containing information on exactly what each of a healthy human body�s cells should look like. Whenever a nanomachine detected a molecule that didn�t fit the profile of a healthy human cell, the nanomachine would seize the flawed molecule and either repair it or destroy it. In this way, nanotechnologists hope their work will one day allow human beings to remain healthy indefinitely. Once an individual accepts cell repair nanomachines into his or her body, the nanotechnology community believes, any kind of disease or dysfunction in that person would become physically impossible � including aging.

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I think what JCook means by "no internal links" is that there's no reason/solvency advocate why the US has to do anything in Mexico specifically.

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there is no solvency advocate. it's like

mexico is there

they're not developing it

US can develop it

mexico should develop it

not "US and mexico should work together to develop nanotech" 

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there is no solvency advocate. it's like

 

mexico is there

 

they're not developing it

 

US can develop it

 

mexico should develop it

 

not "US and mexico should work together to develop nanotech" 

Of. Tom is right, but there is no good evidence saying that will spill over and solve. 

 

What I meant was this:

The problem is, yes the US and mexico could work together, but there is no internal link saying that that is specifically key to anything. 

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