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I found an article but this is weird. When you copy the text it won't paste in Word--not for me anyway. It pastes a message that has a few lines of the article then says "Please site and share..."

 

Link: http://www.bangkokpost.com/opinion/opinion/352111/us-entering-asian-century-with-eyes-closed

 

Does anyone else have the same problem when they try it??

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Our alternative can transform the negative aspects of social hegemony

Barry Smart, 1986, (The Politics of Truth and the Problem of Hegemony, Foucault: A 

Critical Reader, edited by David Couzens Hoy, page 171)

Foucault's critical genealogical analyses of human experience,

AND

economic,and cultural forms of hegemony.

 

Anyone have this?

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Card text: 

Foucault's critical genealogical analyses of human experience, relations of power, and forms of knowledge effectively reveal that forms of social cohesion and hegemony have a precarious and complex history in human practice. The analyses not only disclose the fragile and complex character of the processes through which 'events' and 'experiences' have been formed and rationalized, but as a corollary signify that social phenomena may be transformed. in sum, the work constitutes a major contribution to the development of botha a critical understanding of a and a challenge to prevailing social, economic, and cultural forms of hegemony.

 

Full article:

http://www.mediafire.com/download/gfmszfw6b4cndi6/139196687-Foucault-a-Critical-Reader-The-Politics-of-Truth-and-the-Problem-of-Hegemony.pdf

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Buell 03 (FREDERICK, PROFESSOR @ QUEENS COLLEGE, FROM APOCALYPSE TO WAY OF LIFE:  FOUR DECADES OF ENVIRONMENTAL CRISIS IN THE US, P. 204-208)

By now it should be clear that … and doing all one can.  

 

Does anyone have the full text of this card?

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Buell 03 (FREDERICK, PROFESSOR @ QUEENS COLLEGE, FROM APOCALYPSE TO WAY OF LIFE:  FOUR DECADES OF ENVIRONMENTAL CRISIS IN THE US, P. 204-208)

By now it should be clear that … and doing all one can.  

 

Does anyone have the full text of this card?

 

Full text (it's long):

By now it should be clear that throughout this book, I am advancing my own crisis metaphor. I’ve done this again and again by proposing that people today dwell in rising environmental and environmental-social risk and that they are pressed to try to domesticate themselves within this condition. My metaphor intends to express the problematic nature of that state in several ways. First, it would make it clear that people today dwell within and increasingly feel they dwell within an environment and environmentally constraining/constrained society that are “beyond the limits.†Second, in doing so it would suggest that, along with perhaps resisting these changes, they also try to adapt to these circumstances the best they can. Third, in seeking to so adapt, people have been trying to look out for their own interests, getting their own expert information, remedying their own problems. In fact, they have been encouraged— even forced—to do this. In a time of staged and unstaged environmental controversies, they suffer from an absence of collectively pursued and (even more fundamentally) collectively supported solutions. “Dwelling in crisis†is thus all too often augmented by “domestication within crisis.†Much more positively, my metaphor of dwelling in crisis rules out sets of responses while ruling others in. What it tends to rule out is easy to say. Giving way to disinformation, turning over responsibility to distant authority, and deciding that one’s environment is terminal and therefore to be abandoned are all hard to do if one internalizes the metaphor. One knows one’s dwelling too well to be disinformed; one is too locally and intimately touched to hand all responsibility to an outside authority; and one knows that no other credible refuge exists. What the metaphor rules in —what tasks it sets before people, what possibilities it opens up for people —is perhaps initially far less clear but in fact far more interesting. Over a century ago, Thoreau, in his essay “Walking “noticed how easy it was to “walk a mile into the woods bodily, without getting there in spirit.†He continued: “the thought of some work will run in my head and I am not where my body is—I am out of my senses. In my walks, I would fain be in my senses.â€60 What Thoreau wittily sought was a readjustment of consciousness that represented, finally, an expansion and refreshment of it. Living in one’s senses while one dwells within environmental crisis is much more difficult; it becomes a challenge and a project, not just a regret and a necessity. Like Thoreau, who sought to “know†the beans he cultivated at Walden, one needs to study environmental crisis in order to know it; doing that, one needs to be able to come to one’s senses within what one has learned. Accordingly, it is not surprising to find that coming to one’s senses in a damaged world has inspired a number of environmental-theoretical and practical programs. The ecopsychologist James Hillman has emphasized how peoples’ anesthetization to their environments accompanies and perhaps even helps cause further environmental deterioration and he has argued eloquently for the cultivation of aesthetic awareness of the world as a crucial re sponse. David Abram has urged a new phenomenology that internalizes the wisdom of premodern cultures—the animistic, preliterate experience of the environment as human beings’ conversation partner, not as realm silenced by the invention of literacy and print, a mute “other†there only to be exploited and reshaped. Applying such wisdom today means opening oneself to conversations with a reanimated world as it is now under many forms of siege, not seeking a vanished New-Age/ premodern arcadia. Still others, such as Phyllis Windle and Joanna Macy, have emphasized the need for a new form of environmental experience and practice—that of environmental mourning. Environmental mourning is a means of both absorbing, internalizing, emotionally surviving, and remembering the species, landscapes, and other environmental goods that have been irrevocably lost and of continuing on to love and be engaged with what remains.61 All of these programs advocate ways in which people CRISIS HISTORY 189can seek as actively and positively as possible to dwell in their senses and within crisis; all suggest that doing so will help reverse society’s environmentally destructive momentum. A further approach, one that comes from ecofeminism, joins elements of these predominantly individualpsychological practices together and weaves them into a collective social project resting on materialist social analysis and sponsoring an activist political program. Thoroughgoing and persistent awareness of “embodiment†and “embeddedness†in ecosystems—key to a psychologizing and politicizing of environmental crisis—has been clearly elaborated and advocated in ecofeminism for some time. It is, to translate it into my terms, a way of dwelling actively within rather than accommodating oneself to environmental crisis. It brings with it a number of benefits, but most important here is that it helps people to live in their senses even when to do so is hard. Highlighting just how vulnerable people are to environmental damage because they are all embedded in ecosystems and embodied themselves, this awareness makes people experience in their senses the full impact of dwelling in environmental and ecosocial deterioration and rising risk. Further, emphasizing embodiment and embeddedness makes people pay particular attention in their lives to what ecofeminists and Marxists call the work of reproduction as opposed to the work of production, of producing goods. This labor focuses attention on the environments one actually dwells in (environments that are local, regional, national, and global) rather than what one might produce from them. One focuses therefore on ecological and social health—on concerns such as safe food and water, nurturing children, nursing the elderly, and tending bodies, and on education, sanitation, nutrition, and community creation. Doing so serves to correct old environmental as well gender biases. Further, growth, development, and risk-taking can no longer seem primary and environmental protection secondary. No longer can one use the phrase “sustainable development†(as ecological modernization is tempted to do) as a ploy for proceeding with business as usual; valuation of the work of reproduction puts teeth into the term “sustainable.†It guides personal choices, but it also generates public policy—such as calling for internalizing all the costs of reproduction in every economic activity and calculation. This agenda also urges people to entertain and internalize a new economy of personal and communal environmental feeling today. Formerly, Aldo Leopold helped extend ethics to include species and ecosystems, just as ethics had formerly been extended to include women and “other†peoples.62 The era of conquest (of people, of nature) was over; an era of citizenship and ethics commenced. People needed to recognize and respect the integrity of species and ecosystems—their integrity and their agency as self-willed, self-organizing, spontaneous, wild entities. With the elaboration and the growing perception that people inhabit an alreadydamaged world, a more intimate relationship between people and their biotic (and social) environments has become desirable, even as it has been forced upon people as a necessity. A new economy of feeling that accents intimate connections and relational otherness rather than independent coexistence must come into play. People’s bodies are vulnerable to ecosystems, as ecosystems are vulnerable to people; environmental and ecosocial deterioration is increasingly an intimate matter; the closed circle has brought people and environment closely together. To achieve sustainability, to dwell in crisis, then, people need to work with a new economy of feeling, one that extends a variety of affects and affective practices to environmental contexts. People need to extend erotic, marital, parental, filial, and other kin feelings to environmental relationships. They also need to consider intimacy, nurturing, education, caring, embeddedness, embodiment, exposure, and vulnerability as crucial aspects of environmental as well as social-human, experience. If antienvironmental thought could once sneer at wilderness passions as inhumanly purist—as focusing care on wild, pristine, nonhuman places and not giving a damn about the reworked/worked-over human ones—the ecofeminist economy of feeling yields just the opposite response. As humanity’s sense of connection with its damaged biosphere and increasingly environmentally stressed societies increases, so does its need to care. Indeed, the worse damage means the more care. A child’s sickness intensifies the desire to nurture; something of the same is evoked by wounded environments felt inti mately. Equally, a renewed ferocity about the damage they have suffered emerges. If one is reluctant, as McKibben wisely noted, to make friends from among the terminally ill, one is equally fierce about close kin put at risk by what society has done. Perception of deepened environmental crisis thus does not have to lead to political passivity, to calls for inhumanist authoritarian solutions, or to trying to walk away from the damage. Dwelling in crisis that is firmly perceived as such, coupled with the exploration of a new economy of feeling, opens up a very different set of possibilities for care, commitment, and doing all one can.

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http://www.foreignpolicy.com/articles/2013/08/21/the_pretenders

If that doesn't work, search for the report, go to the CFR site, and view the full text

After about 10 seconds on the link, it opens up the "YOU NEED A FOPO SUBSCRIPTION TO CONTINUE. SIGN UP HERE!!" pop up. The CFR website just redirects me to that link :(

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After about 10 seconds on the link, it opens up the "YOU NEED A FOPO SUBSCRIPTION TO CONTINUE. SIGN UP HERE!!" pop up. The CFR website just redirects me to that link :(

it works fine for me.... try installing adblock -- also check the bottom right for the exit link.

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I'm looking for a card that says debaters should only read kritiks once they actually understand what the K says, K2 education and preventing crappy K debates where the neg does nothing but throw around fancy words in hopes that the aff team will be overwhelmed or give up.

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I'm looking for a card that says debaters should only read kritiks once they actually understand what the K says, K2 education and preventing crappy K debates where the neg does nothing but throw around fancy words in hopes that the aff team will be overwhelmed or give up.

 

I have this argument. It's called "if they have no idea what their arguments are, you should pick up an easy win anyways."

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I'm looking for a card that says debaters should only read kritiks once they actually understand what the K says, K2 education and preventing crappy K debates where the neg does nothing but throw around fancy words in hopes that the aff team will be overwhelmed or give up.

Try googling: "analytics". Worked for me.

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I have this argument. It's called "if they have no idea what their arguments are, you should pick up an easy win anyways."

 

Try googling: "analytics". Worked for me.

LOL. Yeah, I know  :x

 

but is there no author that writes about that stuff? 

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does anyone have some general malthus cards? i have that overpopulation leads to extinction, but i can't find the other arguments. everyone just says lets have abortion

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does anyone have some general malthus cards? i have that overpopulation leads to extinction, but i can't find the other arguments. everyone just says lets have abortion

 

Really Malthus? Tech solves, bro.

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Okay I know I have saw this in one of the camp files, but for some reason I can't find it now. Anybody know where I can find the green tech/ biofuels k2 navy card

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Can anybody access the article violence, fear, and development in Latin America. Also Slums of Asphodel Urban violence in Latin America: An analysis of responses and indirect costs Gabriel Tobias

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