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Phantom707

How Has Debate Messed You Up?

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The title says it all. This site is usually devoted to all the good things debate has done for people, but here's where you can vent why it has made you a horrible person.

 

I'll start with a couple of simple ones.

 

Every time I read an article, I'm looking for cards to cut.

 

The phrase "empirically proven" now just means "This one time, I saw this thing..." to me.

 

And the whole social life thing.

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I get in trouble when arguing with people because if they drop an argument then I want to say they "conceded" it (I didn't know the real definition of the word for a long time) and feel offended if they try to bring it back up again.
 

I waste time on this site.

I can't talk to other people about politics or current events very well, because I'm usually reserved and don't have strong opinions, whereas they've usually got ideologies.

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Every time I hear Capitalism, all i want to say is De-institutionalize. Also I think i coined the phrase "strata" but no one knows what it means, nor what a Body Without Organs is. Also, when i talk to my fellow peers and mention a Rhizome they immediately think back to a cell. Ahh, what has debate done to me...."sits down and writes a book"

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My conversations with my friends just become faster and faster paced.

 

I forget that non-debaters often don't separate the person from the argument after a debate/discussion is over and so some of my friends thought I had views that I don't (that also led to me accidentally annoying some of my friends).

 

Pretty much everything has become a question of how fast I can do it. Example: when someone's trying to type something and they're not as fast as me I have to consciously fight the urge to pull the keyboard away from them and do it myself.

 

My debate friends and I don't all take the same foreign language (even mix between French, Spanish, Japanese, and Mandarin) so sometimes if we don't want a non-debater within earshot of us to understand what we're saying to each other we spread at each other. (NOTE: while that hot guy a few feet away won't understand that you're talking about him, you'll probably scare him off and he'll never talk to you.)

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I'm way too willing to ask people if they've read some critical theory books because I want to see there interpretations on them. 

This years topic has made it impossible to be a good voter when TI stuff is put on our state Ballot. Like, I ran mass transit and I'm still not even sure it's such a good idea. Like, I know all of the on-case against it is pretty much lies from CATO and etc, but I think Gentrification and a lot of the Kritikal stuff against it has given me an awful lot of uncertainty about any new TI. 

 

I've just lost all of my decisiveness and willingness to have strong opinions about politics due to CX 

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CATO

Griswold-Loves free trade

O'Toole- Hates HSR

Chris Edwards- Hates the Army Corp

Poole- Hates the FAA

Norberg-Loves capitalism

So Many CATO people I've learned about from debate!

 

 

I've just lost all of my decisiveness and willingness to have strong opinions about politics due to CX 

 

 

Not sure if this is a good or bad thing for me. I can argue both sides of any popular topics, and often do. I'm often pretty confused though about what I ACTUALLY believe in some issues.

 

 

I'm way too willing to ask people if they've read some critical theory books because I want to see there interpretations on them. 

 

I haven't ever found anyone who reads any K authors, but I'm extremely interested about their interpretations.

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i feared the recent NK missile scare not for my own mortality, but because i was in charge of cutting updates to our guam neg

GORDON MITCHELL in 1998: 

 

While an isolated academic space that affords students an opportunity to learn in a protected environment has significant pedagogical value (see e.g. Coverstone 1995, p. 8-9), the notion of the academic debate tournament as a sterile laboratory carries with it some disturbing implications, when the metaphor is extended to its limit. To the extent that the academic space begins to take on characteristics of a laboratory, the barriers demarcating such a space from other spheres of deliberation beyond the school grow taller and less permeable. When such barriers reach insurmountable dimensions, argumentation in the academic setting unfolds on a purely simulated plane, with students practicing critical thinking and advocacy skills in strictly hypothetical thought-spaces. Although they may research and track public argument as it unfolds outside the confines of the laboratory for research purposes, in this approach, students witness argumentation beyond the walls of the academy as spectators, with little or no apparent recourse to directly participate or alter the course of events (see Mitchell 1995; 1998).

 

The sense of detachment associated with the spectator posture is highlighted during episodes of alienation in which debaters cheer news of human suffering or misfortune. Instead of focusing on the visceral negative responses to news accounts of human death and misery, debaters overcome with the competitive zeal of contest round competition show a tendency to concentrate on the meanings that such evidence might hold for the strength of their academic debate arguments. For example, news reports of mass starvation might tidy up the "uniqueness of a disadvantage" or bolster the "inherency of an affirmative case" (in the technical parlance of debate-speak). Murchland categorizes cultivation of this "spectator" mentality as one of the most politically debilitating failures of contemporary education: "Educational institutions have failed even more grievously to provide the kind of civic forums we need. In fact, one could easily conclude that the principle purposes of our schools is to deprive successor generations of their civic voice, to turn them into mute and uncomprehending spectators in the drama of political life" (1991, p. 8).

 

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GORDON MITCHELL in 1998: 

 

While an isolated academic space that affords students an opportunity to learn in a protected environment has significant pedagogical value (see e.g. Coverstone 1995, p. 8-9), the notion of the academic debate tournament as a sterile laboratory carries with it some disturbing implications, when the metaphor is extended to its limit. To the extent that the academic space begins to take on characteristics of a laboratory, the barriers demarcating such a space from other spheres of deliberation beyond the school grow taller and less permeable. When such barriers reach insurmountable dimensions, argumentation in the academic setting unfolds on a purely simulated plane, with students practicing critical thinking and advocacy skills in strictly hypothetical thought-spaces. Although they may research and track public argument as it unfolds outside the confines of the laboratory for research purposes, in this approach, students witness argumentation beyond the walls of the academy as spectators, with little or no apparent recourse to directly participate or alter the course of events (see Mitchell 1995; 1998).

 

The sense of detachment associated with the spectator posture is highlighted during episodes of alienation in which debaters cheer news of human suffering or misfortune. Instead of focusing on the visceral negative responses to news accounts of human death and misery, debaters overcome with the competitive zeal of contest round competition show a tendency to concentrate on the meanings that such evidence might hold for the strength of their academic debate arguments. For example, news reports of mass starvation might tidy up the "uniqueness of a disadvantage" or bolster the "inherency of an affirmative case" (in the technical parlance of debate-speak). Murchland categorizes cultivation of this "spectator" mentality as one of the most politically debilitating failures of contemporary education: "Educational institutions have failed even more grievously to provide the kind of civic forums we need. In fact, one could easily conclude that the principle purposes of our schools is to deprive successor generations of their civic voice, to turn them into mute and uncomprehending spectators in the drama of political life" (1991, p. 8).

 

Watch out... someone has the Scribd Baudrillard file and has been lookin' at some framework!

But on a more serious note, I fully believe this is true.

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re: Mitchell '98--

 

The debate space isn't the root of the sterilization. It's the way we commodify and talk about suffering. It's a broader academic problem, not one insulated to debate. It causes a real disconnect too. I spent a fair amount of time during undergrad, both in round and just in class, thinking about the various ways that massive numbers of people might come to die. And it always seemed simple enough, because hey, they're numbers. Occasionally someone will die and their human story will be told on the TV, and I just turn into a complete puddle of weepy turd.

 

While language and context are intertwined and often synonymous, I guess I mean to say that it's the language, not the context.

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Watch out... someone has the Scribd Baudrillard file and has been lookin' at some framework!

But on a more serious note, I fully believe this is true.

It's also in Lazzarro's "Johnny 23" kritik that got recently revived (the thread started in 05 hah), that's where I saw it. Neat argument he's got (he had?) going on though.

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What's the impact to desensitization? I've never understood that. Even if you're treating people like arguments instead of people, you're still doing the work to learn about and save them.

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 i sometimes read books like a 1AC, 

 

i  argue with everyone about everything

 

my friends think im a robot

 

 

i have anxiety now 

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I've just lost all of my decisiveness and willingness to have strong opinions about politics due to CX 

This so much.  Debate actually forces you to understand that both sides often have good points.

 

Also every time i hear the word "terrorism " i always think of the tag from that Jackson card from CTS(the one everyone uses as a link)

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#havingover200filesinmyfirstyearofdebate

It's the best feeling though.

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I swear alot more in normal conversation with people. I want to blame debate for this since it started around midway through last year and I've seen the effect happen to other people.

 

My attitudes towards piracy have weakened (I really need just a couple cards from this book and it's not like I'm keeping it!). 

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What's the impact to desensitization? I've never understood that. Even if you're treating people like arguments instead of people, you're still doing the work to learn about and save them.

Only a debater could ask the question, What's wrong with celebrating human misery for an aff? and not understand the obvious answer. 

 

(which is sort of Mitchell's point).

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