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How To Tool A 1Ar?

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Im debating with a novice in a few weeks. She's relatively new to the game, so I was going to go double 2's to show her the ropes. However, we're still competing on a pretty competitive circuit. How should I do the 1ar for her? She just learned how to flow, so I don't think that she'll be ready to do line-by-line, but at the same time, I don't know if I have the efficiency to write out the line-by-line for her. I do have some prewritten 1ar line-by-line block things for her to use, but I doubt that its going to be able to cover everything.

Help? :D

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I would just write some 1AR speeches against the arguments you guys always hit before the tournament.

Then if it is a new argument just have some generic ext/A2 against d/a, T, K, C/P

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Pre-written speeches are key in this case. But I would recommend that you not tool your novice for too long because you have to teach him to become a debater not a tool

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NEVER LET THE WEAKER DEBATER BE THE 1AR. THIS HAS BEEN TRIED MULTIPLE TIMES AND FAILED MISERABLY IN NATIONAL AND LOCAL CIRCUITS.

I'VE SEEN THIS HAPPEN AND IT LOOKS PRETTY BAD TO THE JUDGE ESPECIALLY WHEN THE 2A TELLS HIS/HER PARTNER WHAT TO SAY IN THE 1AR; IT'S LIKE THE 1AR REPEATS WHAT THE 2A SAYS IN THE 1AR.

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I agree with Tommy, you should be the 1ar. You can have pre written 2ACs to pretty much every argument you should hear. So you shouldn't worry about that too much. The major reason for you being the 1ar is that a 2ar can never recover from a bad 1ar. No matter how good of a 2ar you give, most judges won't evaluate it if it wasn't in the 1ar. However, no matter how bad a 2a is, as long as they have a good 1a they can usually extend the good arguments from the 1ar.

 

Also, have pre written impact extensions, and probably impact turns DA type of arguments for the 2ar. Those alone can win a debate in the 2ar.

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This is what happens when you let the weaker debater be the 2NR and this is what's going to happen when you let the weaker debater be the 1AR.

The stronger debater should be 1A/2N

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Another option is to do ins and outs, where you do the 2AC and 1AR, and she does the 1AC and 2AR. I'm not sure if all judges are cool with that, but I have seen it before.

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This is what happens when you let the weaker debater be the 2NR and this is what's going to happen when you let the weaker debater be the 1AR.

The stronger debater should be 1A/2N

 

The best part of this video is that the 2A who said that was almost certainly not the 2N (which means he insults himself).

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I think you need to do a combination of challenging them....and

  • Explain the 1ac to him/her. Cross-ex them. Question about the strengths and weaknesses. See if you can set up typical negative arguments. See if you can get them off their game.
  • Let him/her read the case negative.
  • I walked my 1ar though each and every card....he suggested ways to answer the evidence (kind of like flash card style, although he got time to read and time to think)....and then provided potentially better answers. You could repeat this process a little bit. You might even explain why the newer answers are better than the old. (note: you don't have to provide correction each time if his/her answers are pretty decent).
  • Let your partner go deep on your 2ac blocks. By the way, if you don't have 2ac blocks for every argument....you aren't putting yourself in a place to make this work. Being able to read the 2ac blocks, think about them, and then talk over what you think are the best arguments.....and also arguments you think you should be able to shadow extend.
  • Practice debates with challenging opponents.
  • Rebuttal re-does for his/her 1ar.

Also, the novice needs to know or have a general sense of what constitutes extending an argument.

 

This is a trick I used as a 1ar. This may not work for a novice, but theoretically it should.

 

I flowed all in black....and flowed my 1ar in red. I could circle the arguments from the 2ac I wanted to go for......and clearly see them on the flow. It created a huge contrast effect.

 

As soon as the 1NR sits down....you are obviously going to huddle.

You should probably cue which arguments you need extended on each sheet of paper. In some ways this

 

Before he/she gets up for his 1ar (ie with fully 45 seconds to 1 minute of reserved prep for the 1ar left) they should ask you about questions they have. It doesn't have to be that rigid...

but it can be quite helpful.

 

I don't know how prep time is in high school these days (especially based on specific regions & tournaments)....but I'll assume 8 minutes. You should assume your goals are:

1:30 for 2ac

4 to 5 minutes for 1ar

1:30 minutes for 2ar

 

Its certainly possible to work with other time......but this kind of time allocation kind of sets you up to be able to devote time to helping your 1ar succeed. This really emphasizes the need to have 2ac blocks that are done & are time efficient in producing both quality arguments (ideally a nice mix of offensive & defensive).

 

Finally, there is a rule known as the 80/20 rule which may help you prepare (also called the Pareto Principle). You should also think about the main arguments you hit....and really drill those in the preparation. This is arguments you've already hit and will hear again....as well as arguments that are being run by the teams on your circuit as their go to strategies.

 

One more thing.....you might have him watch a lecture on giving 1ars. And then watching really amazing 1ars in debates is helpful. I wish I could suggest a specific debate that would be easy for a novice to understand--but alas I don;t know one. If you have 1ar in the region who is very clear....and very good....you should probably have him/her watch them. Then if you both watch....you can discuss what they did well...what they could improve on.

 

You might think of creating a checklist of 1) the skills he will need to pick up 2) the knowledge he will need to know about strategy. And in some respects actually working as a team...getting that cohesion down.....is absolutely critical. That cohesion is another reason why 2ac blocks are super-super critical.

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Tooling is bad, mkay.

 

Seriously, it hurts you in the long run. Bite the bullet, lose a few rounds and come back with a vengeance when both of you are clicking.

 

 

Also, if you feel you have no choice, try doing ins and outs. Most judges really don't care at long as they get their measly check.

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I would echo what the Hulk is saying above:

 

Literally tooling them in some respects....does create a sort of crippling. They always know they can depend on you.

 

It kind of disrespects the partner in the debate itself--depending on what shape it takes.

 

Tooling also can create anger cycles between partners (or it certainly risks that).

 

I think still debating together is important...just not in a tool or backpack style (ie speaking in their speech....other than the most vital of rememberances: remember to extend the perm and the PIKs bad....).

 

As a 1ar....I would often get to the end of my speech with 30 seconds left....and ask my 2ac...do I need to cover anything else? This opened a spot to talk in the speech...without it being rude.

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I saw "tooling the 1ar" and immediately assumed this was going to be a thread about neg block strategies.

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i disagree that the 1a should be the better debater :f

 

It is impossible to type out a 2ar completely (unless you spend a lot of time block writing and/or are really fast at typing) since the 2ar strategy / framing of the debate has to be relatively nuanced depending on the round.

 

however, the 1ar just needs to competently extend the arguments that the 2ar needs to win... therefore, block writing solves all your problems since, absent tiny changes that you might have to make due to nuances in the round, your 1a will competently extend everything you need in the debate in order for the 2ar to frame an aff ballot.

 

i think that this is true for a lot of teams (maybe just me idk) --- my partner and i are about equally experienced at debate, yet i still have a majority of my 1ar to common positions pre-written as blocks due to a substantial amount of time working with my partner on them. this is beneficial not only because it saves time, but also because it ensures i go for the arguments my partner feels confident in his ability to go for, as opposed to extending stuff i think would make for a great 2ar but which my partner cannot give a winning speech on :f

 

so yea, you should be the 2a since the 2ar is difficult, and you should also invest time in blocks since blocks are good.

 

...at least have condo or something prepped out for the 1ar/2ar, so you can go for that as an out every debate.

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1. Pick your battles - choosing your aff wisely allows you to focus prep on the most critical 1AR areas. I read a questionably topical aff, and a critical aff, which meant I could block out T/framework/cap extensions. Also, write case extensions to use in a time-crunched situation, which will allow you to weigh key offense in the 2AR even if some of the technical aspects of the flow are dropped. Always have modular condo 1AR blocks.

 

2. Make really good 2AC blocks - two reasons for this. First, it gives your 1A something to read before the round so that they understand the crux of your answer to the argument. If you want, tell them which args in your blocks you want in the 2AR, so they can focus on learning the warrants/writing extensions for these in particular. Second, it minimizes 2AC prep. I've been able to give a lot of standup 2AC's just because I had blocks to most of the arguments in the 1NC.

 

3. Explain the critical pieces of 1AC evidence to your partner before the round. Oftentimes novices don't understand that extensions need to reference evidence, and instead start summarizing the advantage. e.g. "When you extend the econ impact, reference the Royal evidence. He cites warrants like trade, interdependence, miscalc, and diversionary theory."

 

4. Learn to give 2AR's with very little prep. Use 2NR prep to write down the three args you'll go for on the flows you think are real 2NR options. During the 2NR, I grab a new sheet of paper and flow the 2NR on one side in one color, and my 2AR on the other side, so that I can see how the big-picture stuff I'm going for interacts with the 2NR, and so I can make sure not to drop anything critical.

 

5. Shadow-flow the block. Getting a flow of the 2AC is critical for this, and something I have a hard time with, because my novice partner can't backflow for me. If I'm hitting a team I know always reads cap, I'll flow my cap 2AC in the 1AC. When I ran the questionably T aff, I preflowed my 2AC T block on several pieces of paper. Fill in everything else in 2NC prep. While the block is happening, flow the neg arguments, then flow the 1AR responses with a different pen at the same time. As soon as the 1NR is done start explaining the arguments to your 1A, dictating key phrases if wording is important. Make sure they're writing it down. Expect the first few such 1AR's to be trainwrecks (they will nod while you are talking in prep, then forget everything when they stand up).

 

6. Limit your interventions, but don't be afraid to intervene if it will lose you the round. Because you shadow-flowed during the block, you should have your map for the 1AR already written down. Follow along as your partner talks and catch any big mistakes. If you do narrate things in the 1AR, be sure to only say a few words at a time so they can accurately parrot. Bear in mind your 1A will probably be really stressed.

 

7. If there's a really obscure K in the block or something, give the other flows to the 1A to prep after briefly explaining which 2AC arguments you want extended, and write out the 1AR on the K verbatim in Word. Bear in mind if the 1A is a novice, he/she may not understand shorthand (e.g. "we control i/l - sec logic prereq to cap" or whatever), which is why writing it out word-for-word helps.

 

8. Learn to give 2AR's that do a lot of new analysis without sounding like new analysis. This is why it's important to dictate specific phrases for the 1AR - if you have ways you always spin args in the 2AR, having exact quotes carry over, especially if they're memorable, will make the judge more psychologically inclined to accept your extrapolation, even if they don't remember the word usage specifically.

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The post above me is really good.

 

The only thing I'd add is that as a 2AR, show confidence in what the 1AR said, even if it wasn't pretty or particularly good. A 2AR with the right attitude can turn blippy tagline extensions into something more than that without making it look like that's what they're doing.

 

This also will help your novice partner's confidence going forward.

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