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Help On Understanding Deleuze & Guattari

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Which books/lectures should I read/watch in order to better understand D&G? I have had no previous experience with philosophical readings.

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I have had no previous experience with philosophical readings.

Then are you sure you want to start with a D&G k?

 

Or are you talking about learning how to answer it? If so, then I recommend first finding a D&G k and reading through the full text of the cards.

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I've read Anti-Oedipus, and I found the book utterly impenetrable. I have a degree in Philosophy from a top 20 University. A friend of mine who I studied with has a law degree from a top 5 law school, and he said the same. I have heard debaters say that they understand D&G, and they run positions on it. Like the 'Heidegger Kritik' I used to hear about, I have an open mind, but I have my doubts about how much debaters understand it. If you can explain it to me, I'm all ears, (and a few teeth too ;)).

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Which books/lectures should I read/watch in order to better understand D&G? I have had no previous experience with philosophical readings.

 

In terms of Deleuze in a debate context, this was a helpful lecture to listen to in lieu of reading Anti-Oedipus and ATP. http://debatevision.com/videos/130/michigan-debate-institutes-2011-debating-deleuze

 

I would suggest having some basic knowledge of Nietzsche, Marx, and Foucault before jumping in to their work.

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So I started reading literature like this by reading Beyond Good and Evil and Human all too Human by Nietzsche. Those were not the easiest reads ever but I finished them then typed up a Nietzsche shell with some 2nc stuff and framework answers. Then I read part of The Gay Science and a tiny amount of Twilight of the Idols. I am currently reading Thus Spoke Zarathustra and Anti-Oedipus. I have found DnG to be much more understandable by first reading someone else, like Nietzsche. So that's what I would suggest, read Marx, Nietzsche, Zizek, Lacan, whoever. Just have a background of some philosophy and a background on the ideas of Nietzsche, Marx, and Freud and you will be in a good place.

P.S. - Don't expect to be a DnG master after one read-through. I honestly think I know between 1%-2% of what I have read really well, and there is no guaranteeing that it is right. Just read it, reread passages that do not make sense the first time, annotate (this helped a lot), and ask people who have read it or know what it talks about.

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Edmund Zagorin is arguably the greatest Deleuze debater ever, that lecture Shree posted is the seconded only by the one he gave us at Xylum. Deleuze's style is exceptionally difficult and abstract (written in such a way providing the ability for various readings and interpretations of his text).

 

Deleuze is honestly the last author I'd make someone without any background in philosophy or theory try to read. Not only do you need to be familiar with the ideas of Nietzsche, Marx, Freud, Foucault, and Saussure, but you need to be able to read on that level and comprehend some abstract concepts. If you are new to critical literature, DO NOT READ DELEUZE AS A K. Any round you'll win will be based purely off the other teams incompetence.

 

If you want help answering the K, there is probably a more productive way of explaining that doesn't require the knowledge needed to run the K but enough to understand the concepts and how to answer the K.

 

Secondary literature is also very useful as it concretizes the language used by Deleuze and Guattari. Claire Colebrook's Understanding Deleuze is a good read, and there is a ceasefire article that explains the Deleuzian concept of a War Machine very efficiently

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If you're going to read Deleuze (or Marx or Hegel or Neech) you should read them with an accompanying dictionary or reader. These can help explain the assumptions they make and the works they build on. For example, Neech's work on identity (as fluid/multiple and composed of various competing 'wills', as opposed to the singular, homogenous "I" of analytic philosophy) is foundational to Deleuze and Guattari's poststructuralism.

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I've read Anti-Oedipus, and I found the book utterly impenetrable. I have a degree in Philosophy from a top 20 University. A friend of mine who I studied with has a law degree from a top 5 law school, and he said the same. I have heard debaters say that they understand D&G, and they run positions on it. Like the 'Heidegger Kritik' I used to hear about, I have an open mind, but I have my doubts about how much debaters understand it. If you can explain it to me, I'm all ears, (and a few teeth too ;)).

 

Your internet wang is pretty large good sir.

 

I commend you.

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