Jump to content
eagle1486

Ugliness K

Recommended Posts

Hey does anyone know where I can find an ugliness K? I havent been able to find one and i dont really know how to find cards for it either as I have never seen one

  • Downvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey does anyone know where I can find an ugliness K? I havent been able to find one and i dont really know how to find cards for it either as I have never seen one

 

That's because I'm pretty sure this doesn't exist. You can't just choose a random word, put it before the letter K, and expect people to know what you're looking for.

  • Upvote 8
  • Downvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Beauty Is Closely Enticed With The Truth, Which Means Ugly is Directly Related To Lies. Greeks And Romans Prove. Beauty Shapes The World and Our Ideology Behind It.

 

Gayford 04 [Martin Gayford studied philosophy at Cambridge, and art history at the Courtauld Institute of London University “Beautiful people good, ugly people bad†The Telegraph http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/books/3625972/Beautiful-people-good-ugly-people-bad.html 24 Oct 2004]

 

"Beauty is truth, truth beauty," John Keats declared. "That is all ye know on earth, and all ye need to know." Or rather, that is what the poet claimed the Grecian Urn said to mankind. No doubt he was right to be cautious. The truth about beauty is a deep and tangled question, and one the writer and novelist Umberto Eco gets into a right old muddle about in this lavish but deeply confusing book. It is described as "a history of a Western idea", but it is also an anthology. Each chapter consists of a series of rather brief remarks by Eco, followed by a series of extracts from texts, printed in small blue letters. Gathered around them are numerous glossy colour illustrations, mainly of paintings and sculptures – though the book claims also to take in "architecture, film, photography, the decorative arts, novels and poems". It is conceived for "a vast and diverse readership". Already one senses trouble. The result reads a little like the entries in that Monty Python competition to summarise Proust in 30 seconds. It is an attempt by a renowned professor of semiotics from Bologna to précis the whole of Western culture in 438 pages, most of them taken up by colour photographs. Not surprisingly, the result is often more of a triumph of compression than clarity. Here he is on the same theme as the Grecian Urn: "Beauty was configured as a synonym for truth, within a deep rethinking of a traditional hendiadys. For Greek thinkers beauty coincided with truth because, in a certain sense, it was truth that produced Beauty; contrariwise, the Romantics held that it was Beauty that produced truth. Beauty does not participate in truth, but is its artifice. Far from shunning reality in the name of a pure Beauty, the Romantics thought in terms of a Beauty that produced greater truth and reality." It's as simple as that. Actually, Eco is quite often perfectly sensible; it's just that one needs to have some prior knowledge of the subject in order to understand him. The early Greeks were inclined to think that beautiful people were good and ugly people bad – still a common point of view, though likely to lead to disillusion. "The most beautiful is the most just," proclaimed the Delphic Oracle. Plato opined that beauty lay in harmony and proportion, and was best discerned by the mind, not the eye. In late antiquity and the Middle Ages, following the philosopher Plotinus and Abbott Suger of St Denis, many were of the opinion that light and colour emanated from the divine. Looking, therefore, at objects such as mosaics flashing in lamp-light, stained-glass windows and jewelled chalices might bring you closer to God. Peering at beautiful bodies, on the other hand, would be more likely to betray you into the clutches of the devil. Eco is at his best on the Middle Ages, on which he has written before. Eco's dash through art history becomes ever more breathless. After the Renaissance, the modern art world began to take shape with its endless metamorphoses of style and fashion.

 

Since my opponent is clearly ugly, All of their evidence is lies. They are corrupting our minds with simply contrary to the truth. You must reject the 1AC in order to recognize the corruption they are implementing, And vote Neg to counteract it. Only way to solve Corruption in the debate.

 

*************

 

I have a 2NC stuff too....

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My favorite answer to this and the Bordem K that I've seen was the 2AC getting up and playing "Sexy and I Know It"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

I like the Kiergaard evidence but think it should be underlined differently, maybe also with some more warrants from the surrounding paragraphs of that essay.

Also, I'd use that as a 2NC impact addon/case turn, and put this into the 1NC shell.

 

 

Boredom is the worst thing ever: it's the emotional embodiment of an inescapable nihilism that totally destroys all value in life.

Thiele 97 // Leslie is a Professor of Political Science at the University of Florida // “Postmodernity and the Routinization of Novelty: Heidegger on Boredom and Technology†// Palgrave Macmillan Journals, Vol 29, No. 4 // p. 501-3)

Heidegger identifies "deep boredom" as a pervasive indifference to worldly existence as a whole. In deep boredom, worldly life is resisted and resented as a burden.33 No less than the anxious do the bored sense their alienation from the world and from themselves. Unlike the anxious, however, the bored forsake the quest for a home in the world. The world ceases to be a home in its familiar everydayness. But it also ceases to be an abode for ontological [and] questioning. The absence of home is no longer experienced as a loss. In anxiety, one cares apprehensively for a homeless self. In the "mute fog" of boredom, this care dissipates.34 Anxious concern evaporates into a sterile calm. Heidegger writes, "Why are there beings rather than nothing.... The question is upon us in boredom, when we are equally removed from despair and joy, and everything about us seems so hopelessly commonplace that we no longer care whether anything is or is not."35 Anxiety is a mood that brings us "face to face with Nothing itself." Heidegger contrasts this to profound boredom, which "draws all things, all men and oneself along with them, together in a queer kind of indifference. This boredom reveals what-is in totality.... Yet at the very moment when our moods thus bring us face to face with what-is-intotality they hide the Nothing we are seeking". 36 The danger of boredom is not that it confronts us with the groundlessness of Being. If anything, that is its virtue. The danger of boredom is that it stifles all ontological questioning of this groundlessness in the fog of indifference. Boredom is, in itself, an anesthetizing mood. It inhibits thought and reduces feeling to torpor. To psychologize its genesis, one might say that the fear of facing one's ontological condition, the fear of anxiety itself, lures one into the insensibility of boredom. Heidegger describes this repression as a form of cowardice. He writes that "An experience of Being as something 'other' than everything that 'is' comes to us in anxiety [Angst], provided that we do not, from anxiety of anxiety, i.e. in sheer timidity, shut our ears to the soundless voice which attunes us to the horrors of the abyss."37 Anxiety and boredom both confront us with the abyss of Being as nothingness. Both anxiety and boredom bring us face to face with the threatening in significance of the finite self. In anxiety, however, one experiences a profound concern for this terrifying mystery, a concern that may transform itself into wonder if courageously digested. In boredom, the mystery is avoided by a listless or frenzied turning away. Nietzsche gestured at this danger. He vividly portrays the confrontation of nihilism in Zarathustra's story of the sleeping shepherd. A snake crawls into a sleeping shepherd's mouth and firmly lodges itself. Awakened, the horrified shepherd bites off the snake's head to rid himself of it. Thus winning his freedom, the shepherd laughs as only a victorious person can. Heidegger suggests that the shepherd was assailed by nihilistic boredom owing to a philosophic torpor. The "black snake," Heidegger writes, "is drear monotony, ultimately the goallessness and meaninglessness of nihilism."38 The shepherd's courage to bite deeply into the ungroundedness of life ultimately saves him. Today, Heidegger worries, we lack the courage of the shepherd. Rather than confronting and overcoming deep boredom, we choose to ignore, resent, or suppress it. This marks the true victory of nihilism. Heidegger worried that humanity's capacity for anxiety was waning just as the mood of profound boredom waxed. The mood of anxiety, he suggests, might become completely absorbed and displaced by boredom. Ennui would then supplant existential angst as the disposition through which contemporary human being becomes saturated with its thrownness. The result of this displacement would be a "philosophic somnolence Which is nihilism proper."39 This, Heidegger maintains, constitutes the chief threat to humanity. The ascendance of boredom signifies our incapacity to dwell in the question of Being and hence our incapacity fully to dwell in the world.40 Nihilism is profound boredom with a world that has lost its meaning. More to the point, nihilism is profound boredom with a world from which human being has ceased to solicit or demand meaning. At the heart of nihilism, the significance of significance [there] itself evaporates.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

×
×
  • Create New...