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Denver_East_03

New Da To Cut?

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Hey there cross-xers,

 

So I am an assistant debate coach and our nat quals tournament is in a couple of weeks and I am interested in cutting a new semi-generic disad.

 

I've been getting bored of hearing debris, weaponization, and politix, and want to try and work on something new and interesting with my students.

 

Any suggestions....?

 

Thanks

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One that I think can be pretty strategic and many teams haven't heard before is the Space Disease DA. Basically saying that when we explore, especially moon missions or mars or something, we'll cut some space disease. Here is a 1NC to start you out:

 

No pandemic now

SCHLUETE,  ROGER, 2/09/2012 [http://www.bnd.com/2...a-mild-one.html, President of Humanist Society of Santa Barbara]

 

Q. Where's the flu this year? Of course, we are experiencing one of the warmest winters on record. But I'd better not say too much or else we'll have a pandemic!

-- K.S., of Collinsville

A. I'm sure I'd get an argument from a couple of ill colleagues, but, just like the weather, flu activity has been unseasonably mild this winter.

If you check the weekly flu surveillance maps at www.cdc.gov, you'll find no widespread outbreaks as of Jan. 28. Forty-eight states and New York City report that doctors are seeing "minimal" numbers of patients for flulike illnesses. Only Alabama reported "low" activity.

 Some credit the warm winter for the sunny flu forecast. The thinking is that the flu virus loves cold temps and low humidity levels. Those conditions often see people huddled together more in homes and offices, which also may aid the bug's spread

 

 

A new disease can cause an epidemic

Bayona 04 (Manuel, Department of Epidemiology School of Public Health University of North Texas, "Disease Outbreak Investigation," college board.com, 2004, http://www.collegebo...se_outbreak.pdf)

 

There are many reasons why an outbreak occurs. However, four common circumstances lead to an

epidemic. These are: 1. When susceptible individuals travel into an endemic area where the infectious disease exists. 2. When a new infectious disease is introduced by humans or animals traveling from an endemic area into a susceptible human population in whom the disease is not endemic, or when contamination of food, water or other vehicles takes place by an agent not normally present, such as cyanide (a poison) introduced into Extra Strength Tylenol® accidentally or anthrax spores placed into mail as a terrorist act. 3. When a preexisting infection occurs in an area of low endemicity and reaches susceptible persons as a result of new or unusual social, behavioral, sexual or cultural practices. Examples include migration of refugees during war time and pilgrimages to religious places and churches. 4. When host susceptibility and response are modified by natural or drug-induced immunosuppression (cancer treatment), malnutrition or diseases such as AIDS.

 

 

It is possible for harmful diseases to be brought back from space

Strieber 03 (Whitley, American author known for his books on extraterrestrial abductions, "Can We Catch Diseases from Space?", unknown country.com, September 26, 2003, http://www.unknownco...-diseases-space)

 

With so many probes heading for Mars and other planets, the question of whether they could bring back new diseases has become important. SARS, Mad Cow Disease and HIV are only three of the diseases that have crossed the species barrier, so infectious pathogens from Martian rock samples probably could too. Leslie Mullen writes in Astrobiology Magazine that the International Committee Against Martian Sample Return is worried about this. Not all pathogens cross the species barrier? our dogs and cats get diseases that don't affect us. Chicken and sheep farmers are untouched by diseases that wipe out their flocks and herds. A Martian microbe could enter the human body, but be harmless because it's incompatible with human physiology. "After living in the dirt of Mars, a pathogen could see our bodies as a comparable host; they could treat us 'like dirt,'" says NASA?s John Rummel. "?It could be that even if the microbes lived inside us, they wouldn't do anything, it would just be this lump living inside you." This is the most likely scenario, since life on Mars would have evolved without humans present. Pathogens are most likely to cross species barriers when both species evolved at the same time. One theory is that life was brought to Earth by meteorites coming from Mars, suggesting that life on Mars might be closely related to life on Earth. However, life forms on both planets would have evolved extensively since then, meaning that pathogens from one planet might no longer be able to infect living things on the other planet. However, if we are related to Mars life, it could also mean we're susceptible to Mars diseases. Can we wall up evil and keep it from getting out? The Egyptians tried, and failed. Learn all about it on this week's Dreamland!

 

 

A pandemic will cause the mass extinction of many species on Earth

DiBiase 10 (David, Chair of the UCGIS Education Committee and Chair of the Editorial Committee of the UCGIS Body of Knowledge, "Human Extinction", e-education.psu.edu, 2010, https://www.e-educat...export/html/307)

 

Recall from Module 8 that a hazard is a possibility of an event that causes harm. A human extinction hazard is thus a possibility of an event that causes human extinction. For better or worse, there exist quite a few human extinction hazards. Here are some important ones: In Module 8 we saw that biological hazards have lead to some of the most severe disasters in human history, such as the bubonic plague and the "Spanish" flu. Another pandemic could occur. Indeed, in recent years there have been several near-pandemics, including severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and new flu strains. Due to genetic diversity within the human population, it is unlikely for one pathogen to kill everyone. Probably some people will happen to have immunity. But this is not guaranteed, and meanwhile the devastation from a major pandemic could be so severe that civilization never recovers. Given the many major interconnections between human systems and environmental systems, we should expect human extinction to have major environmental consequences. Here are the main reasons why this is indeed the case. Impacts of the extinction event. Depending on how humans go extinct, environmental systems could also be significantly affected. If there is a pandemic that only infects humans, then the extinction event itself would not have much effect on the environment. However, for other extinction scenarios, the impacts would be quite large. As we've seen in this course, climate change and biodiversity loss harm natural systems at least as much as they harm human systems, with many non-human species going extinct. The explosions and atmospheric dust accumulation from nuclear weapon detonation or asteroid or comet impact would affect all species equally, except for those in deep sea ecosystems that get their energy from hydrothermal vents instead of sunlight. While it is unlikely that any one event would end all life on Earth, the event would probably eliminate a significant portion of the species now alive. Consequences of Earth without humans. Human impact on Earth systems is so large that this era of Earth's history is known as the anthropocene. Without further human influence, ecosystems would evolve in very different directions. Ecosystems would not return to exactly how they were before humans. If nothing else, the many lingering artificats of human civilization would prevent this from happening. But some return would occur, as would other novel changes. Some of these consequences are explored in the book The World Without Us by Alan Weisman. To get an overview of the ideas presented there, please view this timeline. Consequences of life beyond Earth. In the Module 3 reading Long-Term Sustainability, it was discussed that Earth will eventually become inhabitable for all life, and that humans could help life survive into the rest of the universe by colonizing space. However, if humans go extinct, then this could not happen. Thus, the threat of human extinction is also the threat of all life on Earth failing to make it into the rest of the universe. That means that means that when it comes to human extinction hazards, the stakes are literally galactic in scale, or even larger. That's quite large!Hope that helps!

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Hey there cross-xers,

 

So I am an assistant debate coach and our nat quals tournament is in a couple of weeks and I am interested in cutting a new semi-generic disad.

 

I've been getting bored of hearing debris, weaponization, and politix, and want to try and work on something new and interesting with my students.

 

Any suggestions....?

 

Thanks

 

I hear Fear of Death is pretty relivant.

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