Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
DerpDerpDerp

Military Effectiveness Impact

Recommended Posts

Can anyone supply me with a card/link to a piece of evidence which states the importance of our military. I'm using it as a military readiness advantage impact. BUT, i DO NOT want to link into heg. I just need an impact that states what would happen in a world where our military sucks. THANKS.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just need an impact that states what would happen in a world where our military sucks. THANKS.

military=hard power hard power=heg thus military sucks=heg sucks

I think youd be best off using us heg decline bad cards

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Readiness solves war

Spencer 2k Jack Spencer, Policy Analyst for Defense and National Security in the Kathryn and Shelby Cullom Davis Institute for International Studies at The Heritage Foundation 9/15/00, Heritage Foundation Reports

Military readiness is vital because declines in America's military readiness signal to the rest of the world that the United States is not prepared to defend its interests. Therefore, potentially hostile nations will be more likely to lash out against American allies and interests, inevitably leading to U.S. involvement in combat. A high state of military readiness is more likely to deter potentially hostile nations from acting aggressively in regions of vital national interest, thereby preserving peace.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I did a Google search for "deterrence readiness -hegemony". Almost all of the first page is about World of Warcraft.

  • Upvote 3
  • Downvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I did a Google search for "deterrence readiness -hegemony". Almost all of the first page is about World of Warcraft.

Conclusion: read a World of Warcraft impact.

 

But in all seriousness, military readiness key to heg is probably your best bet, heg impacts abound and while there are a lot of impact turns there's still a good chance for you to win heg good.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Readiness is critical to solve asymmetric conflicts that escalate to nuclear use – accesses every impact.

Bennett ‘8 (John, Defense News, “JFCOM Releases Study on Future Threatsâ€, 12-4, http://www.defensenews.com/story.php?i=3850158)

 

The study predicts future U.S. forces' missions will range "from regular and irregular wars in remote lands, to relief and reconstruction in crisis zones, to sustained engagement in the global commons."

Some of these missions will be spawned by "rational political calculation," others by "uncontrolled passion."

And future foes will attack U.S. forces in a number of ways.

"Our enemy's capabilities will range from explosive vests worn by suicide bombers to long-range precision-guided cyber, space, and missile attacks," the study said. "The threat of mass destruction - from nuclear, biological, and chemical weapons - will likely expand from stable nation-states to less stable states and even non-state networks."

The document also echoes Adm. Michael Mullen, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and other U.S. military leaders who say America is likely in "an era of persistent conflict."

During the next 25 years, it says, "There will continue to be those who will hijack and exploit Islam and other beliefs for their own extremist ends. There will continue to be opponents who will try to disrupt the political stability and deny the free access to the global commons that is crucial to the world's economy."

The study gives substantial ink to what could happen in places of strategic import to Washington, like Russia, China, Africa, Europe, Asia and the Indian Ocean region.

EXTREMISTS AND MILITIAS

But it calls the Middle East and Central Asia "the center of instability" where U.S. troops will be engaged for some time against radical Islamic groups.

The study does not rule out a fight against a peer nation's military, but stresses preparation for irregular foes like those that complicated the Iraq war for years.

Its release comes three days after Deputy Defense Secretary Gordon England signed a new Pentagon directive that elevates irregular warfare to equal footing - for budgeting and planning - as traditional warfare. The directive defines irregular warfare as encompassing counterterrorism operations, guerrilla warfare, foreign internal defense, counterinsurgency and stability operations.

Leaders must avoid "the failure to recognize and fully confront the irregular fight that we are in. The requirement to prepare to meet a wide range of threats is going to prove particularly difficult for American forces in the period between now and the 2030s," the study said.

"The difficulties involved in training to meet regular and nuclear threats must not push preparations to fight irregular war into the background, as occurred in the decades after the Vietnam War."

Irregular wars are likely to be carried out by terrorist groups, "modern-day militias," and other non-state actors, the study said.

It noted the 2006 tussle between Israel and Hezbollah, a militia that "combines state-like technological and war-fighting capabilities with a 'sub-state' political and social structure inside the formal state of Lebanon."

One retired Army colonel called the study "the latest in a serious of glaring examples of massive overreaction to a truly modest threat" - Islamist terrorism.

"It is causing the United States to essentially undermine itself without terrorists or anyone else for that matter having to do much more than exploit the weaknesses in American military power the overreaction creates," said Douglas Macgregor, who writes about Defense Department reform at the Washington-based Center for Defense Information.

"Unfortunately, the document echoes the neocons, who insist the United States will face the greatest threats from insurgents and extremist groups operating in weak or failing states in the Middle East and Africa."

Macgregor called that "delusional thinking," adding that he hopes "Georgia's quick and decisive defeat at the hands of Russian combat forces earlier this year [is] a very stark reminder why terrorism and fighting a war against it using large numbers of military forces should never have been made an organizing principle of U.S. defense policy."

FAILING STATES

The study also warns about weak and failing states, including Mexico and Pakistan.

"Some forms of collapse in Pakistan would carry with it the likelihood of a sustained violent and bloody civil and sectarian war, an even bigger haven for violent extremists, and the question of what would happen to its nuclear weapons," said the study. "That 'perfect storm' of uncertainty alone might require the engagement of U.S. and coalition forces into a situation of immense complexity and danger with no guarantee they could gain control of the weapons and with the real possibility that a nuclear weapon might be used."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

American military readiness is key to maintain global hegemony, proliferation, and terrorism

Federation of American Scientists (FAS), Chapter 10, P. 123 05/29/09, Budget of the US Government, FY 1998 Defense Budget, “Budget of the United States Government.â€

 

America's armed forces remain in the Persian Gulf, deterring war in that critical region of the world. In Asia and the Pacific region, U.S. military forces provide the critical foundation for peace, security, and stability, in partnership with Japan and other nations. In our own region, America's soldiers have supported the return of democracy in Haiti and helped end the exodus of refugees to our shores. To fulfill such missions, support our allies, and reassure our friends that America is prepared to use force in defense of our common interests, our armed forces must be highly ready and armed with the best equipment that technology can provide. In the 21st Century, we also must be prepared and trained for new post-Cold War threats to American security, such as ethnic and required conflicts that undermine stability. Some of these post-Cold War threats, such as the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, terrorism, and drug trafficking, know no national borders and can directly threaten our free and open society.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...