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Alright...

 

So with flowing and stuff.

 

I understand that you have only 8 minutes of prep that entire debate round. That's a little short.

 

So, I was wondering how can you flow and pull up evidence at the same time while in a debate round? Aren't you too busy trying to listen to their tags and understand their arguments to be trying to pull of evidence at the same time? How are you supposed to go about doing this?

 

Does 1 partner flow the entire debate and the other partner just get evidence or do you swap (the person who's about to speak needs to flow so they can have their arguments ready) or what happens?

With only 8 minutes of total time in the entire debate, it seems way too long to be trying to yank out responses for your next speech if you flowed the entire debate round yet if you were pulling up evidence while they were speaking, you are probably going to miss/drop arguments.

 

I also know that there's an epidemic of no-flowers. With time constraints, I can sympathize, but I keep getting told that flowing is the best.

 

So how do you go about doing this? Please explain!

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Ok so for novices, you want to emphasize that both debaters should flow the entire round. Use your prep time (and cx time) to write and "pull" your answers and evidence.

 

As your chemistry develops, and you differentiate in your familiarity with different args, partners will alternate starting to pull out answers and front-lines with flowing. Then partners can help catch each other up with things they missed.

 

As you get better at flowing, and become more familiar with cx and the topic, you will start to become familiar with certain arguments, and will be able to "half-listen" to certain cards. It is also critical that you are very familiar with your boxes or digital files, and their organization. This means not just having a bunch of files from camp, but rather files you have compiled/researched yourself, re-indexed, and personally made extensions and overviews. This level of preparation is why most coaches say that in policy, the debate is usually over before you get on the bus.

 

Also, as partners get more comfortable with each other, they can start helping "backflow" their partners speeches. This means that while their partner is speaking, you flow the speech for them, so that they have a complete flow when they sit down. This is helpful, because it is common for a speaker to make off-the-cuff analyticals as well as not have written down new evidence they have read during the speech. As you become more familiar with your answers, and partner, it will be easier to do backflowing while simultaneously working on your own speech.

 

In the end, the key is getting good at basic flowing and organization, and practice debating often, so that you are able to deal with the stress and time constraints.

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Ok so for novices, you want to emphasize that both debaters should flow the entire round. Use your prep time (and cx time) to write and "pull" your answers and evidence.

 

As your chemistry develops, and you differentiate in your familiarity with different args, partners will alternate starting to pull out answers and front-lines with flowing. Then partners can help catch each other up with things they missed.

 

As you get better at flowing, and become more familiar with cx and the topic, you will start to become familiar with certain arguments, and will be able to "half-listen" to certain cards. It is also critical that you are very familiar with your boxes or digital files, and their organization. This means not just having a bunch of files from camp, but rather files you have compiled/researched yourself, re-indexed, and personally made extensions and overviews. This level of preparation is why most coaches say that in policy, the debate is usually over before you get on the bus.

 

Also, as partners get more comfortable with each other, they can start helping "backflow" their partners speeches. This means that while their partner is speaking, you flow the speech for them, so that they have a complete flow when they sit down. This is helpful, because it is common for a speaker to make off-the-cuff analyticals as well as not have written down new evidence they have read during the speech. As you become more familiar with your answers, and partner, it will be easier to do backflowing while simultaneously working on your own speech.

 

In the end, the key is getting good at basic flowing and organization, and practice debating often, so that you are able to deal with the stress and time constraints.

This makes perfect sense. Thank you for this response! Now I absolutely understand how people are able to flow and prep their answers/evidence... I guess now I just need to practice, practice, practice and develop my flows to get to this level. I knew it has something to do with experience. But just one quick question. How are you able to backflow for them when it's on your speech? I mean like when they sit down after you've flowed them, it's on your flowsheet not theirs and they're using their flow while they're up on the speech. Do you just fill the missing stuff in on their flow after they get through or what?

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The tough thing about learning to flow as a novice is that in a lot of cases, you won't really need too. you're pretty much working with basic spending DAs, maybe topicality, and case. you could probably even just listen to the arguments your opponenets are making and just pick out files/cards that are responsive and you'll do ok. my average was 4-1 at almost every tournament doing this as a novice.

 

HOWEVER!!!

the problem with this is that when you get ready to go to camp, and start debating varisty, you HAVE to be able to keep a solid flow in order to simply understand what is happening in the round (this is true for non-speed debates too).

 

just make sure you're getting a summary of the tag, the author, the date, and once you jot that down, start looking for evidence. when they start to read another one, stop, flow it real quick, t hen start searching. i debate paperless, but i use this concept and it seems very effective for me. also, prep time is there for a reason. make sure you flow everything, and then worry about getting evidence. that way, if you don't have everything by the end of CX, you can take a minute or so of prep to get your evidence together.

 

Or you could read performance Baudrillard and kritik debate. that's always an option ;)

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