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Helium-3

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So i was thinking about making a Helium-3 aff. does anyone know where i could get some good evidence on it and i could get some ideas? its just basically going to the moon to mine helium-3 an isotope that isnt common on earth and is good for nuclear fusion and energy. Advantages would be like enviornment, prolif rep/prolif good, middle east oil, or other stuff like that. anything else? or what should i change or any comments?

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Moon is a 2009 British science fiction drama filmabout a man who experiences a personal crisis as he nears the end of a three-year solitary stint mining helium-3 on the far side of the Earth's moon.

 

Lunar Industries employee Sam Bell is contracted to work for three years at the largely automated "Sarang" lunar base, with only an artificial intelligence assistant named GERTY for company. His job is to oversee the automated harvesters which extract helium-3 from the lunar regolith. He periodically sends full canisters to Earth, where the helium-3 is used to generate much-needed clean fusion energy.

 

 

This was a pretty sick movie, and it incorporates a lot of the ideas you're wanting to have in this aff. So, I would def recommend watching it or even just skimming over the summary on Wikipedia to get those creative juices flowing.

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I've divided the post into four sections which speak to many of the issues in the HE-3/helium debate.

 

Here are about 10 different advantage areas for the HE-3 Affirmative:

1) Nonproliferation [an ok treaty related internal]

2) Border security/Nuclear Terrorism

3) Treaties (Multilateralism, International Law, Exceptionalism etc..)

4) Semi conductors (economy/competitiveness, environment, military/national security, etc.) Semiconductors are key to Congress and everything we do. Also, see the semi-conductors key to economy for multiple reasons card below. Semi-conductors can potentially be an internal to almost any computer tech as well as nanotech related advantages. Chinese modernization (I'm not sure how it fits in this particular debate, given there might be a global lift on semiconductors depending on how you frame the argument). Also terrorism via EMP attacks.

5) Health care research (MRI & heart related research)

6) Energy research

7) Metal welding which is an internal to the industrial economy

8) Fiber opics which is an internal into communications (aka the economy)

9) Various misc. internals to advantages like chromatography machines and commercial diving and physics research and cryogenic processing. Also, weather balloons.

10) Various scenarios from whatever international countries are doing with it (probably mostly health care research related--but you may find specific scenarios to their research).

 

Various HE-3 and Semiconductor Sites (a per college case list):

Note several teams on the college topic ran a semi-conductor based advantage on the immigration topic and their sites are here. Here is Georgia's version of that aff which is reasonably extensive.

 

The little H-3 prevents extinction card that Georgia also read.

AKA: Extinction’s inevitable from climate, asteroids, and supernovas --- only Helium-3 solves

Walker 2 (Bill, “The Case Against Human Extinction”, Free Republic, 7-31, http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/news/725634/posts)

 

The human species is not the … ecosystems into being on other planets.

Helium-3 trades-off with first generation fusion --- solves advanced weapons prolif

Beljac 7 (Marko, Ph.D. – Monash University, “He-3 Nuclear Fusion and Moon Wars”, Science and Global Security (Blog), 5-22, http://sciencesecurity.livejournal.com/43875.html)

 

Helium-3 is a key source of fuel … resource worth fighting for.

Extinction

Bekkum 4 (Gary S., Founder – Spacetime Threat Assessment Report Research, “American Military is Pursuing New Types of Exotic Weapons”, Pravda, 8-30, http://www.starstreamresearch.com/dark_matters.htm)

Recently the British science news journal "… should be forbidden!"

 

(It might access the particle accelerator debate......but I'm not sure.)

 

Various Impact Scenarios from H-3 and Semiconductors:

I think I isolated most all of the impacts below--the best card is probably the big econ card.

 

This government doc on He-3 claims its key to:

 

National security, nonproliferation, defense, border security, and homeland security. Also, oil and gas industry (???--exploration for new drilling), medical diagnostics, and general med research. Specifically lack of it causes a violation of non-proliferation treaty obligations (international law, nonprolif, multilateralism, and US exceptionalism bad)

 

The government also claims energy. [but that can be accessed by 1/2 the affs on the topic]

 

Further, MRI research & the medical research infrastructure (probably some health care research competitiveness). Conceivably future deaths due to disease of the week impact scenarios (probably with the shortest timeframe--but I think the best way to frame this impact is systemic & that as overwhelming timeframe & da risk).

 

This article from AAAS has some decent explanation of some of the issues regarding Helium 3 along with some discussion of the alternatives. There should also be some recent government testimony on the issue of helium 3 (which I ran across)--just search helium 3 and national security.

 

This is an ok internal link to pulmunary research-- heart science research--I'm sure tons better will be found :

 

The isotope has also brought about a recent revolution in pulmonary science and medicine, says Dr. Jason Woods, an assistant professor of radiology at Washington University, in St. Louis, who testified before Congress on the shortage. The development of a new kind of He-3 diffusion MRI, he says, has allowed "our scientific knowledge of lung physiology and pathology [to accelerate] exponentially over the past few years."

 

Also on the timeframe & threshold issue of supply--this card quantifies the issue:

 

But the annual production of He-3 in the United States has fallen to less than 8000 liters, according to John Pantaleo, who directs the U.S. interagency committee in charge of disseminating the gas. Most He-3 is extracted from decaying tritium in thermonuclear warheads—about every five years, when that tritium is replaced. Because the United States has been reducing its nuclear weapons stockpile, the amount of He-3 produced has plummeted over the last two decades. And because demand grew rapidly after 9/11, the U.S. He-3 stockpile has dropped from more than 200 000 L in 2001 to less than 50 000 L today.

 

And its the internal to the international market of he-3:

 

But as much as the shortage may constrict U.S. research, it has a bigger impact on researchers in other countries. Since Russia stopped selling its He-3 supply abroad in 2008, the world is dependent on U.S. gas. The result is an out-of-balance international market. Physics Today reported in June that Netherlands-based Leiden Cryogenics, which makes dilution refrigerators for low-temperature physics, paid US $2150 for one liter of He-3 in early 2010, an amount that just one year earlier would have cost $100.

 

I omitted a ok quantification of the he-3 allocated for med. research.

 

This is just an overview & quoting this guy would be a little out of context, but interesting ideas for scenarios (particularly optical fibers and semiconductors--it also specifies the US agencies who are deploying He-3 for counter-terrorism/homeland security:

 

It's the U.S. government's fear of a terrorist nuclear weapon and the past five years of frantically building thousands of "neutron detectors" for both US border points and overseas governments.

 

The Department of Defense, Department of State, NNSA, and DHS all have deployed radiation detection equipment to detect smuggled radiological and nuclear material. Through programs such as Cooperative Threat Reduction, the Second Line of Defense, and the Radiation Portal Monitor program, these agencies have deployed thousands of radiation portal monitors both domestically and overseas. Each portal uses approximately 50 liters of helium-3 as the basis for its neutron detection capability. Some of the programs have been in place since before 2001. Others, such as those operated through DHS, were established later. The broad expansion of these deployments has provided the greatest demand for helium-3 and been the largest drain on the helium-3 stockpile.

 

While the detector development and acquisition may eventually peak off, the demand for more helium for science and medical practices will not. In addition to the traditional use of helium for balloons (weather as well as party variants), helium is also used for cryogenic processing, manufacturing optical fibers and semi-conductors, purging and pressurizing space rockets, metal welding, chromatography machines, and commercial diving. This averages to a demand of more than two billion cubic feet per year.

 

Quote above from the Arm Chair Generalist here.

 

Semi-conductors can be used to access environmental (smart grid & eco car, etc), military/national security/RMA, as well as economy/competitiveness advantages. There's probably an additional internal into the terrorism debate.

 

For instance--the whopping semiconductors internal to the economy debate from the National Defense University:

 

The semiconductor industry is critical to America for at least three reasons: (1) it has

been an engine of growth for the US economy, accounting for the second largest share of exports

(behind aerospace),58 (2) the industry boosts productivity across industries and around the globe

through the information technology and business process transformation it enables, and (3) it

provides a dominant technological advantage to US defense forces. The US has been the “first

mover” in every major technology to appear in the world economy since World War II

(semiconductors, computers, software, advanced materials, network communications, and

biotechnology),59 and has reaped the rewards. Today, the US economy accounts for 25% of

world gross domestic product (GDP) and is twice as large as the economy of its closest

competitor, China.60

The mechanism by which technology leads to prosperity is two-pronged. First, high-tech

products command broad global market share and high profits; second, technology applied to

industry boosts productivity and output. The high-tech sector of the US economy directly

accounts for 7.0% of US GDP,61 and has bolstered the US position in international markets,

maintaining an almost equal balance of trade while exports of all other goods have declined to

produce a trade deficit of over $800B.62 At the same time, technology applied to manufacturing

and knowledge generation has accelerated US productivity. The productivity advantage of the

US over other countries accounts for 75% of the per capita income gap, and this productivity

advantage, largely gained in the 1990s, was almost entirely due to technology investments that

provided four times the rate of return as other investments.63

Today, the US economy is particularly reliant on the semiconductor industry. Often called

“the crude oil of the information age,64” semiconductors enable the powerful computers and

global knowledge networks that advance technology at an exponential rate and accelerate

productivity in industries that produce high-demand products.65

Public

 

Various impact scenarios from the semi-conductors debate from an SIA:

 

The semiconductor industry is critically important to the United States. It is the second

largest U.S. exporting industry, a major source of high-wage employment, a stimulus to

development in a number of U.S. regions, and provides critical enabling technology for

the rest of the U.S. and global economy, for national defense, for lowering the cost and

improving the delivery of health care services and for advancing overall quality of life.

Semiconductors are also the enabling technology that will allow increased efficiencies for

alternative energy sources, a new Smart Grid to distribute electricity, and applications

such as power management that reduce energy consumption.

 

One more economy FYI on semi-conductors also from the SIA whitepaper:

 

The U.S. semiconductor industry directly employs about 200,000 people in the United

States and is the world semiconductor market share leader with 48 percent of world wide

sales. Semiconductors have consistently been the first or second top U.S. export category

over the past six years. This export performance reflects the fact that 85 percent of global

semiconductor consumption occurs outside of the United States and 80 percent of the U.S.

industry’s sales is overseas.

 

note I cut this card short--so go back and cut the full card.

 

Some limited assessment of the negative options:

 

I think there are two counterplans which this aff is vulnerable to:

1) advantage counterplans (internal links seem to be weak so far--just scratching the surface) also the timeframe & "crisis now" cards seem to be pretty weak so far. I haven't checked all the congressional testimony.

2) also--an alternatives counterplan which also reallocates the distribution of use to the most viable advantages for the aff.

 

not a great position--but I think both tech & crisis solves scarcity args. will be ok defense. or some sort of malthusian turn perhaps which outstrips the timeframe of getting to space.

 

Other alternatives for args:

1) nanotech bad (semiconductors internal link)

2) dedevelopment [unfortunately the semiconductors key to the environment & energy are pretty key takeouts to this arg).

3) development by other countries bad

4) chinese military modernization bad (internal link from semiconductors)

5) hegemony bad or militarism bad to beat back

6) risky shift DA or Iatrogenesis DA from last year to take out health care lives saved with research.

Edited by nathan_debate
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I've got a fairly acceptable He-3 aff from just cutting a bunch out of a "helium 3" search on Lexis and Google. The science geek in me needs to get this out: please don't abbreviate Helium as H. That is hydrogen. "He" has been used for a long time; there's no reason to go changing that.

 

Some articles that seem like a good-enough starting place:

http://articles.cnn.com/2006-12-18/tech/fs.moonmining_1_helium-3-moon-base-nuclear-fusion?_s=PM:TECH

http://www.popularmechanics.com/science/space/moon-mars/1283056

http://www.technologyreview.com/Energy/19296/

http://www.popularmechanics.com/science/space/moon-mars/1283056

http://www.wired.com/science/space/news/2006/12/72276

http://www.hindu.com/2004/01/26/stories/2004012600601500.htm

http://www.wired.com/dangerroom/2010/04/helium-3-shortage-could-mean-nuke-detection-disaster/

 

I imagine this article doing well against energy advantages.

 

Also this book looks promising. Note that the author supports the private sector getting He-3/colonizing the moon/etc. That could be a CP I guess, but it honestly may end up not that good because of competition issues.

 

On superconductors, I've found this article that seems like it would be good from the title, but I have no access to it (hint, hint).

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wow thank you guys so much.

 

what do you guys think of the idea in general i know there will be a lot of resource mining affs out and maybe some generic He-3 affs by camps and on planetdebate and shtuff, but i feel like it would get torn apart by Spanos or Cap or a timeframe debate. also i want to deviate from the generic enviornment advantages any ideas?

im thinking like of like education maybe 1 envriornmnet scenario and then a dichotomy adv to go with a prolif good adv? like when non-capitalist countries have nuclear weapons its bad when capitalist countries have them its ok. good idea or no?

 

how would a substantial T work out? On this aff and in general next year? you cant really measure exploration

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Like i said, only a few weeks worth of work, but it could really be something if someone put the energy into it. I'm not going to be debating the space topic and since the potential college resolutions have come out, I'll be researching that instead.

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Like i said, only a few weeks worth of work, but it could really be something if someone put the energy into it.

I see what you did there.

 

Also, amazing file.

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Sorry for the double post in advance.

 

Maybe it's just me, but the internal link from He-3 to semiconductors seems pretty weak.

 

This website

indicates it's just under 15% of He-3 that actually goes towards semiconductors.

 

Other websites

just laundry list...and semiconductors just happens to be in the laundry list. Nathan_debate's cards are similar...

 

Has anyone had better luck? Keep in mind I've only barely searched lexis...but what I found wasn't very convincing either.

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There are some GREAT cards on China's mission to mine He3 on the moon in their next mission. It would really add some link weight to the Primacy advantage in the AC. Also, if you guys are looking for add-ons, He3 provides a unique way of detecting nuclear material, and the US had already began using it in anti-terror efforts before we ran out.

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I heard some solvency arguments basically saying that you can't even get it onto earth because it will burn up in the atmosphere.

 

 

Helium-3 is a non-radioactive hydrogen isotope with one neutron and two protons. It is carried through space via the Sun’s solar winds, but
burns up as it enters Earth’s atmosphere, making it almost non-existent here on our planet
. However, an abundance of helium-3 has built up on the Moon’s surface over the millennia as confirmed in soil samples collected by the Apollo 17 lunar mission, and it is just waiting to be mined.

 

I'm not sure if you could transport it safely in a shuttle or what.. you might want to look into that.

 

 

 

 

http://www.freedomsphoenix.com/News/092466-2011-06-27-mining-helium-3-will-transform-dark-side-of-the-moon.htm

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That's just why it isnt here on the earth

 

I'm pretty sure there's helium-3 in the core.

 

What we do know about the deepest regions of the Earth is largely deduced from meteorites and rock samples.

 

Lava and basalt contain small amounts of helium-3 not predicted by traditional planetary theory. There was no known natural production method to account for this isotope being present in such high quantities so scientists could only conclude that it originated from the Earths formation around 4.5 billion years ago. Rather incredible to believe but with no other obvious explanation available other than cosmic dust it has remained the generally accepted theory for over 30 years. To make it fit the evidence roughly 10 times as much helium-4 from radioactive decay had to have been mixed with the helium-3 and in a fashion enabling very narrow ranges of composition.

 

Results of the first numerical simulation of a deep-Earth reactor were published in 2001 by Marvin Herndon and Daniel Hollenbach. Confirming everything Herndon had published in the eight years prior to it, the calculations showed for the very first time how a deep-Earth nuclear reactor would produce both helium-3 and helium-4 in similar ratios to what is actually found in volcanic lavas and basalts. This is extremely strong evidence for a deep earth reactor.

 

 

You could probably aruge it would be better to get the helium-3 from earth, but I would assume It would probably be more feasible trying to obtain helium-3 from the moon than trying to excavate it from earth's core.

 

http://www.spacedaily.com/news/earth-03k.html

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I would seriously consider reading a lunar solar power aff instead of helium 3. The ev for lunar solar power is miles better, and you don't have to deal with issues like whether or not fusion actually works (it doesn't). The cards make similar claims, but you sidestep the best neg case args, so it might be best to reconsider.

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I would seriously consider reading a lunar solar power aff instead of helium 3. The ev for lunar solar power is miles better, and you don't have to deal with issues like whether or not fusion actually works (it doesn't). The cards make similar claims, but you sidestep the best neg case args, so it might be best to reconsider.

 

 

You could Co-Op internationally to avoid militarization DA's.

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How good is the solvency evidence on he3 allows fusion? I was wondering because the camp negs on this aff seem to have great solvency takeouts.

 

lol there's a reason that they have great take-outs. I spent a few hours looking over the lit and saw there were major flaws.

 

There's a reason $10 billion is going to fund deteureum-tritium fusion and the guy arguing for helium-3 is doing it from the basement of his lab... there are extremely large hurdles to pass.

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Has anyone ran a helium-3 aff at a tournament this year yet? I'm trying to see what arguments I need to be prepped out for the most.

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How good is the solvency evidence on he3 allows fusion? I was wondering because the camp negs on this aff seem to have great solvency takeouts.

 

There are very good solvency cards for both the aff and neg. I think one camp put out a card that the only hurdle was political, but that directly points you to a politics DA

 

Has anyone ran a helium-3 aff at a tournament this year yet? I'm trying to see what arguments I need to be prepped out for the most.

 

Terrorism, China, Alternative Energy.. Most of them fall under these...

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No, I mean what does the run against he 3 affs. I've seen some case-spec disads and stuff, but they look really dumb. I wanted to know what most negs are using against them

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