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nathan_debate

The latest from Zalmay Khalilzad

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Along with a nice answer to reverse spending DAs.

 

Failure to contain the deficit results in massive economic & hegemonic decline.

Khalilzad in 2011 (ZALMAY KHALILZAD, almay Khalilzad was the United States ambassador to Afghanistan, Iraq, and the United Nations during the presidency of George W. Bush and the director of policy planning at the Defense Department from 1990 to 1992, The Economy and National Security, National Review, FEBRUARY 8, 2011, p. online, http://www.nationalreview.com/articles/

259024/economy-and-national-security-zalmay-khalilzad)

 

Without faster economic growth and actions to reduce deficits, publicly held national debt is projected to reach dangerous proportions. If interest rates were to rise significantly, annual interest payments — which already are larger than the defense budget — would crowd out other spending or require substantial tax increases that would undercut economic growth. Even worse, if unanticipated events trigger what economists call a “sudden stop” in credit markets for U.S. debt, the United States would be unable to roll over its outstanding obligations, precipitating a sovereign-debt crisis that would almost certainly compel a radical retrenchment of the United States internationally.

 

Such scenarios would reshape the international order. It was the economic devastation of Britain and France during World War II, as well as the rise of other powers, that led both countries to relinquish their empires. In the late 1960s, British leaders concluded that they lacked the economic capacity to maintain a presence “east of Suez.” Soviet economic weakness, which crystallized under Gorbachev, contributed to their decisions to withdraw from Afghanistan, abandon Communist regimes in Eastern Europe, and allow the Soviet Union to fragment. If the U.S. debt problem goes critical, the United States would be compelled to retrench, reducing its military spending and shedding international commitments.

 

 

Us hege key to check multiple scenarios for war (including east asia & china)

Khalilzad in 2011 (ZALMAY KHALILZAD, almay Khalilzad was the United States ambassador to Afghanistan, Iraq, and the United Nations during the presidency of George W. Bush and the director of policy planning at the Defense Department from 1990 to 1992, The Economy and National Security, National Review, FEBRUARY 8, 2011, p. online, http://www.nationalreview.com/articles/

259024/economy-and-national-security-zalmay-khalilzad)

 

American retrenchment could have devastating consequences. Without an American security blanket, regional powers could rearm in an attempt to balance against emerging threats. Under this scenario, there would be a heightened possibility of arms races, miscalculation, or other crises spiraling into all-out conflict. Alternatively, in seeking to accommodate the stronger powers, weaker powers may shift their geopolitical posture away from the United States. Either way, hostile states would be emboldened to make aggressive moves in their regions.

 

As rival powers rise, Asia in particular is likely to emerge as a zone of great-power competition. Beijing’s economic rise has enabled a dramatic military buildup focused on acquisitions of naval, cruise, and ballistic missiles, long-range stealth aircraft, and anti-satellite capabilities. China’s strategic modernization is aimed, ultimately, at denying the United States access to the seas around China. Even as cooperative economic ties in the region have grown, China’s expansive territorial claims — and provocative statements and actions following crises in Korea and incidents at sea — have roiled its relations with South Korea, Japan, India, and Southeast Asian states. Still, the United States is the most significant barrier facing Chinese hegemony and aggression.

 

 

Economy key to check hegemonic decline

Khalilzad in 2011 (ZALMAY KHALILZAD, almay Khalilzad was the United States ambassador to Afghanistan, Iraq, and the United Nations during the presidency of George W. Bush and the director of policy planning at the Defense Department from 1990 to 1992, The Economy and National Security, National Review, FEBRUARY 8, 2011, p. online, http://www.nationalreview.com/articles/

259024/economy-and-national-security-zalmay-khalilzad)

 

Since the end of the Cold War, a stable economic and financial condition at home has enabled America to have an expansive role in the world. Today we can no longer take this for granted. Unless we get our economic house in order, there is a risk that domestic stagnation in combination with the rise of rival powers will undermine our ability to deal with growing international problems. Regional hegemons in Asia could seize the moment, leading the world toward a new, dangerous era of multi-polarity.

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Teams should totally be cutting the card like this instead:

 

Khalilzad in 2011 (ZALMAY KHALILZAD, almay Khalilzad was the United States ambassador to Afghanistan, Iraq, and the United Nations during the presidency of George W. Bush and the director of policy planning at the Defense Department from 1990 to 1992, The Economy and National Security, National Review, FEBRUARY 8, 2011, p. online, http://www.nationalreview.com/articles/

259024/economy-and-national-security-zalmay-khalilzad)

While we face significant challenges, the U.S. economy still accounts for over 20 percent of the world’s GDP. American institutions — particularly those providing enforceable rule of law — set it apart from all the rising powers. Social cohesion underwrites political stability. U.S. demographic trends are healthier than those of any other developed country. A culture of innovation, excellent institutions of higher education, and a vital sector of small and medium-sized enterprises propel the U.S. economy in ways difficult to quantify. Historically, Americans have responded pragmatically, and sometimes through trial and error, to work our way through the kind of crisis that we face today.

 

The warrants are way better and it can destroy the ethos of any team who reads either of the Khalilzad cards.

Edited by Chaos
fixed underlining

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While I think that card is quite good & lists several compelling warrants (i would go so far as to say its on fire), it seems to be focused on the economic aspects of hegemony. (or economic & perhaps cultural--ie the people)

 

Resiliance doesn't always solve crisis (ie the safety nets put into our economy between the 1930s and 2007 didn't stop that crisis). Those rainy day umbrellas broke like toothpicks. (obviously not all were meant to solve that specific type of crisis).

 

Also, even if you are right, its uniqueness for a hege disad (or even for an aff--it proves that their scenario is the only possible way to topple hege--as the economy is all shored up).

 

That said...again...great card. No doubt & thanks for posting.

 

Also, I think theres probably plenty of room to spin it into an answer to most generic hege positions.

Edited by nathan_debate

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You are a scholar and a gentleman.

 

sorry, but nathan is actually a novice and a little kid who thinks he knows what he's doing

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Last time I checked. Good arguments beat name calling every day of the week.

 

How many of Red Spys teams have gone to the NDT or the elims of CEDA or been ranked in the top 10 of any of the 3 college leagues? Or students coached teams in finals of the NFL?

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Last time I checked. Good arguments beat name calling every day of the week.

 

How many of Red Spys teams have gone to the NDT or the elims of CEDA or been ranked in the top 10 of any of the 3 college leagues? Or students coached teams in finals of the NFL?

 

You obviously don't understand the value of the ad hominem argument

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