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LaurenNicole

Diseases collapse capitalism?

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Does anyone have evidence or know where to find evidence that proves pandemics lead to a collapse of the capitalist system?

AIM - Lauren Sayyysss

or you're welcome to PM me

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I would recommend looking for evidence that pandemics shift the public to a less capitalist leadership and towards another(of course I only suggest this because the alternative is anything but capitalism, only find evidence as specific as you are willing to argue).

 

I find logically pandemics boost capitalism, because it entrenches spending on capitalist medicine, or at least medicine through the current capitalist system.

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Take a hard look at what historically happened after the Spanish Flu epidemic of 1918. Then connect the dots.

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camp files- use them

 

Disease greatly weakens economies and government stability

 

Ogden and Wilder 03 (Jon and David, South China Morning Post, April 4, 2003, Business Post, Economic effects of disease set to fuel more interest in HK$ forwards, p.8, http://www.lexisnexis.com.proxy.lib.umich.edu/us/lnacademic/results/docview/docview.do?docLinkInd=true&risb=21_T6986757888&format=GNBFI&sort=RELEVANCE&startDocNo=1&resultsUrlKey=29_T6986757891&cisb=22_T6986757890&treeMax=true&treeWidth=0&csi=11314&docNo=2)

 

Hong Kong dollar forwards eased slightly yesterday, in line with a lower number of reported new atypical pneumonia cases. But analysts say the decline may only be a brief consolidation period before forwards push higher again on concerns that the economic effect of the disease will further weaken the government's shaky financial position. One-year forwards eased back to a spread of 198 to 208 pips having gone as high as 230 pips on Wednesday, said James Malcolm regional currency strategist JP Morgan. One pip is equal to one-tenth of a HK cent. "The interest in forwards doesn't seem to be on the verge of receding," said Mr Malcolm, adding the market had yet to fully price in the risks of a Hong Kong dollar devaluation. It is feared that the huge effect the pneumonia outbreak is having on economic activity will lead to lower revenues for the government and also cause higher spending as officials battle to deal with the outbreak. "The peg system could be exposed to higher risk under this situation and the impact on the stock market at thatmoment will be obvious," said Eric Yuen at Dao Heng Securities. The outbreak could also knock some key assumptions made by Financial Secretary Antony Leung Kam-chung in his March budget including 3 per cent economic growth and the revenue expected when a freeze on land sales is due to end next year. "Eventually, when the government resumes the land sales, I don't think the developers will participate as flat inventories won't be absorbed yet and land sale revenues will be affected," Mr Yuen said. "This means that the disposal of government assets will fall short of expectations. On top of the lower gross domestic product rate, there will be great pressure on the deficit and the stability of the peg system." The Hong Kong government is on course to post a record budget deficit this year, eroding its fiscal reserves and fuelling concerns that confidence in the currency board will be undermined. The Hong Kong Monetary Authority yesterday reiterated its commitment to the Hong Kong dollar peg in response to a report by Mr Malcolm on the risks of depegging the local dollar. In the report, Mr Malcolm said that even with the government's tax increases in place "Hong Kong's fiscal trajectory is unsustainable" given that fiscal reserves had fallen 30 per cent from their 2001 peak and would fall another 15 per cent this year. A HKMA spokesman was quoted by Dow Jones as saying that the link had served Hong Kong well over the past 19 years and would continue to do so.

 

The world economy will be devastated by an outbreak – H1N1 proves

 

Yunwei and Jinwei 5/4/09 (Fu and Fing, BBC Monitoring Asia Pacific - Political, Xinhua: Jointly Curb Flut To Save World Economy, May 4, 2009, http://www.lexisnexis.com.proxy.lib.umich.edu/us/lnacademic/results/docview/docview.do?docLinkInd=true&risb=21_T6986800859&format=GNBFI&sort=RELEVANCE&startDocNo=1&resultsUrlKey=29_T6986800862&cisb=22_T6986800861&treeMax=true&treeWidth=0&csi=10962&docNo=1)

 

At a time when the global financial crisis still ravages the world economy, the outbreak of influenza A/H1N1 further adds to the economic woes of a number of countries and regions. How to jointly control the epidemic and reduce its impact on the world economy is another challenge facing the international community. It is an urgent task to cope with the flu to serve the world economy in an overall and efficient manner. Since it struck Mexico in mid-April, the epidemic has inflicted prominent fluctuations on the world's main stock and foreign exchange markets as well as staple commodities like petroleum. The shock wave can also be felt in some countries' real economic sectors like tourism, food and transportation. The world economy is bound to face more grave challenges as long as the flu remains unchecked. In coping with flu epidemics to protect the world economy, mankind has both experience and lessons. Historically, we see that the world economy could be badly wrecked by not only problems like financial and economic crises but also diseases, wars and environmental deterioration. The spread of diseases can use up tremendous medical resources and result in the contraction of production and economic circulation. Therefore, it is economically significant to effectively put influenza A/H1N1 under control. Specific measures should be taken to tackle the epidemic. First, the international community should conduct effective cooperation to boost public confidence. Only when they have strong confidence would investors and consumers expand investment and consumption to promote economic growth. Confidence is needed in fighting both the financial crisis and the current flu epidemic. Second, we should handle the flu in a scientific and proper manner to minimize its impact on international investment. Although the flu has produced negative impact on the world economy as Joaquin Almunia, commissioner for economic and monetary affairs of the European Commission, has said, the international community has accumulated richer knowledge and expertise in preventing and controlling viruses than before. In addition, governments have better capabilities in organizing and mobilizing social resources to deal with epidemics, making them possible to take scientific, appropriate and farsighted measures to tackle the flu, which in turn benefits the stability and development of the economy. With the spread of influenza A/H1N1, the world must also be alert to protectionism which may arise under the pretext of safeguarding public health security, since the flu may stir worries over the safety of products from some virus-hit countries. Necessary restrictive trade measures should be based upon adequate medical proof. To tackle the current financial crisis, the international community has agreed to jointly overcome the hard times, which is in sharp contrast to what happened in the Great Depression when some countries implemented extreme selfish policies. As long as countries continue to boost confidence and cooperation, people are bound to see the light at the end of the tunnel soon in both efforts to fight influenza A/H1N1 and secure economic recovery.

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camp files- use them

 

 

Disease greatly weakens economies and government stability

 

Ogden and Wilder 03 (Jon and David, South China Morning Post, April 4, 2003, Business Post, Economic effects of disease set to fuel more interest in HK$ forwards, p.8, http://www.lexisnexis.com.proxy.lib.umich.edu/us/lnacademic/results/docview/docview.do?docLinkInd=true&risb=21_T6986757888&format=GNBFI&sort=RELEVANCE&startDocNo=1&resultsUrlKey=29_T6986757891&cisb=22_T6986757890&treeMax=true&treeWidth=0&csi=11314&docNo=2)

 

Hong Kong dollar forwards eased slightly yesterday, in line with a lower number of reported new atypical pneumonia cases. But analysts say the decline may only be a brief consolidation period before forwards push higher again on concerns that the economic effect of the disease will further weaken the government's shaky financial position. One-year forwards eased back to a spread of 198 to 208 pips having gone as high as 230 pips on Wednesday, said James Malcolm regional currency strategist JP Morgan. One pip is equal to one-tenth of a HK cent. "The interest in forwards doesn't seem to be on the verge of receding," said Mr Malcolm, adding the market had yet to fully price in the risks of a Hong Kong dollar devaluation. It is feared that the huge effect the pneumonia outbreak is having on economic activity will lead to lower revenues for the government and also cause higher spending as officials battle to deal with the outbreak. "The peg system could be exposed to higher risk under this situation and the impact on the stock market at thatmoment will be obvious," said Eric Yuen at Dao Heng Securities. The outbreak could also knock some key assumptions made by Financial Secretary Antony Leung Kam-chung in his March budget including 3 per cent economic growth and the revenue expected when a freeze on land sales is due to end next year. "Eventually, when the government resumes the land sales, I don't think the developers will participate as flat inventories won't be absorbed yet and land sale revenues will be affected," Mr Yuen said. "This means that the disposal of government assets will fall short of expectations. On top of the lower gross domestic product rate, there will be great pressure on the deficit and the stability of the peg system." The Hong Kong government is on course to post a record budget deficit this year, eroding its fiscal reserves and fuelling concerns that confidence in the currency board will be undermined. The Hong Kong Monetary Authority yesterday reiterated its commitment to the Hong Kong dollar peg in response to a report by Mr Malcolm on the risks of depegging the local dollar. In the report, Mr Malcolm said that even with the government's tax increases in place "Hong Kong's fiscal trajectory is unsustainable" given that fiscal reserves had fallen 30 per cent from their 2001 peak and would fall another 15 per cent this year. A HKMA spokesman was quoted by Dow Jones as saying that the link had served Hong Kong well over the past 19 years and would continue to do so.

 

The world economy will be devastated by an outbreak – H1N1 proves

 

Yunwei and Jinwei 5/4/09 (Fu and Fing, BBC Monitoring Asia Pacific - Political, Xinhua: Jointly Curb Flut To Save World Economy, May 4, 2009, http://www.lexisnexis.com.proxy.lib.umich.edu/us/lnacademic/results/docview/docview.do?docLinkInd=true&risb=21_T6986800859&format=GNBFI&sort=RELEVANCE&startDocNo=1&resultsUrlKey=29_T6986800862&cisb=22_T6986800861&treeMax=true&treeWidth=0&csi=10962&docNo=1)

 

At a time when the global financial crisis still ravages the world economy, the outbreak of influenza A/H1N1 further adds to the economic woes of a number of countries and regions. How to jointly control the epidemic and reduce its impact on the world economy is another challenge facing the international community. It is an urgent task to cope with the flu to serve the world economy in an overall and efficient manner. Since it struck Mexico in mid-April, the epidemic has inflicted prominent fluctuations on the world's main stock and foreign exchange markets as well as staple commodities like petroleum. The shock wave can also be felt in some countries' real economic sectors like tourism, food and transportation. The world economy is bound to face more grave challenges as long as the flu remains unchecked. In coping with flu epidemics to protect the world economy, mankind has both experience and lessons. Historically, we see that the world economy could be badly wrecked by not only problems like financial and economic crises but also diseases, wars and environmental deterioration. The spread of diseases can use up tremendous medical resources and result in the contraction of production and economic circulation. Therefore, it is economically significant to effectively put influenza A/H1N1 under control. Specific measures should be taken to tackle the epidemic. First, the international community should conduct effective cooperation to boost public confidence. Only when they have strong confidence would investors and consumers expand investment and consumption to promote economic growth. Confidence is needed in fighting both the financial crisis and the current flu epidemic. Second, we should handle the flu in a scientific and proper manner to minimize its impact on international investment. Although the flu has produced negative impact on the world economy as Joaquin Almunia, commissioner for economic and monetary affairs of the European Commission, has said, the international community has accumulated richer knowledge and expertise in preventing and controlling viruses than before. In addition, governments have better capabilities in organizing and mobilizing social resources to deal with epidemics, making them possible to take scientific, appropriate and farsighted measures to tackle the flu, which in turn benefits the stability and development of the economy. With the spread of influenza A/H1N1, the world must also be alert to protectionism which may arise under the pretext of safeguarding public health security, since the flu may stir worries over the safety of products from some virus-hit countries. Necessary restrictive trade measures should be based upon adequate medical proof. To tackle the current financial crisis, the international community has agreed to jointly overcome the hard times, which is in sharp contrast to what happened in the Great Depression when some countries implemented extreme selfish policies. As long as countries continue to boost confidence and cooperation, people are bound to see the light at the end of the tunnel soon in both efforts to fight influenza A/H1N1 and secure economic recovery.

 

thanks. what camp file is this evidance in?

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