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snelling101

Parks aff

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I think an aff about increasing social services to the poor be building more parks/ recreational areas could be sort of interesting. In my mind(note: i havn't done research about this) i think you could claim an advantage of peoples well being, such as the parks help people relieve stress.

 

input/ideas?

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Just wait...someone will come on here and tell you that something that provides any service to anyone who isn't poor is not topical. Ignore that idiot.

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if you can get by that whole T thing here are some cards that might help you out, maybe you could run it with a brownfields spin

 

Greenspaces key to creating “livable communities”, encouraging physical activity

Hirschhorn no date (Joel S, National Governors Association, “BROWNFIELDS PROJECTS TO IMPROVE PUBLIC HEALTH” ,http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:9G613CEOMzkJ:www.nga.org/Files/pdf/ 1102BROWNFIELDS.pdf+parks+recreation+ brownfields+redevelopment+site:.org&hl=en&ct=clnk&cd=7&gl=us)

Getting to the proverbial “next level” of performance is always challenging. For brownfields redevelopment in the United States, a major expansion could result from explicitly linking brownfields projects to improvement of public health, aside from any cleanup. Promoting active living can be achieved by converting brownfields into walkable mixed-use communities and into new greenspaces that serve nearby communities. The considerable literature on brownfields, however, has not emphasized health benefits from promoting regular physical activity.

It is not enough to talk about “quality of life” or “livable communities.” Direct health benefits offer an opportunity to connect with the vital concerns of many Americans who want to practice more preventive medicine under their own control. Considering the contemporary epidemics of obesity, diabetes, and other diseases associated with a lack of regular physical activity, government officials and developers need to learn more about the connection between brownfields redevelopment and physical activity. Putting emphasis on the physical activity aspects of brownfields projects will benefit from involving local residents around the project site and public health officials. Local residents should be given ample opportunities to participate in the planning and design of both mixed-use and greenspace projects, if the projects are to be effective in promoting routine physical activities. There is considerable potential for having local and state public health officials become more involved in the early stages of brownfields projects, when they can testify to the health benefits of community designs that benefit active living. A sign of the growing recognition of the importance of physical activity was the introduction of U.S. Senate Bill 2821 in 2002, known as the Improved Nutrition and Physical Activity Act. Federal funds would be provided to states or local governments for many possible uses, including: “Planning for and promotion of bike paths, walking paths, or other similar or related environmental changes that promote physical activity.” The federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have a host of activities related to promoting physical activity, including Active Community Environments which promotes walking, bicycling, and the development of accessible recreation facilities. In the private sector, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the nation’s leading philanthropy devoted to health and health care, is supporting a number of “active living” programs designed to promote increased physical activity.

 

Redeveloping brownfields into parks key to the physical health of a community

 

Hirschhorn no date (Joel S, National Governors Association, “BROWNFIELDS PROJECTS TO IMPROVE PUBLIC HEALTH” ,http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:9G613CEOMzkJ:www.nga.org/Files/pdf/ 1102BROWNFIELDS.pdf+parks+recreation+ brownfields+redevelopment+site:.org&hl=en&ct=clnk&cd=7&gl=us)

Redeveloping brownfields into mixed-use communities or new greenspaces is not new. But what is new is promoting the redevelopment of brownfields on the basis of improved active living and resulting public health benefits. It is a potentially powerful way of achieving higher levels of brownfields activity with stronger public and financial support. Promoting active living is now recognized as essential for improving public health. Many brownfields are ideal for mixed-use redevelopment projects that improve public health by supporting greater physical activity. Mixed-use development that provides a walkable, pedestrian-friendly community with great green infrastructure can provide definite health benefits. The key is to have easy, safe access between residences and shopping, jobs, schools, and public spaces. Residents need pleasant, safe routes to places they go to on a regular basis, and not solely places for exercise and recreation. However, many brownfields are too small for significant mixed-use projects, but they can serve the physical activity needs of surrounding neighborhoods by being redeveloped into green spaces, such as ball parks, pocket parks, recreation fields, trails, community gardens, or community plaza and arts areas.

 

Brownfield redev into parks key to solve deadly physical inactivity

 

Hirschhorn no date (Joel S, National Governors Association, “BROWNFIELDS PROJECTS TO IMPROVE PUBLIC HEALTH” ,http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:9G613CEOMzkJ:www.nga.org/Files/pdf/ 1102BROWNFIELDS.pdf+parks+recreation+ brownfields+redevelopment+site:.org&hl=en&ct=clnk&cd=7&gl=us)

Brownfield cleanups have numerous public health benefits, even though they may be difficult to quantify, although addressing specific exposures and risks from site contaminants is usually done to justify cleanups. State cleanup programs often demonstrate their effectiveness in terms of increased employment and other socio-economic measures, without emphasizing the concomitant public health benefits, aside from any cleanup.

The medical community has now recognized the enormous importance of regular physical activity. In fact, physical activity is now the single best indicator of a person’s health. But some 70 percent of adults are physically inactive. Physical inactivity is a major cause of a host of health impacts, including: heart disease, colon cancer, osteoporosis, diabetes, depression, hypertension, and obesity. Medical professionals have coined the term “Sedentary Death Syndrome,” because there are some 300,000 preventable deaths a year resulting from the various impacts of physical inactivity, especially obesity. The dominant “sprawl” form of land development has resulted in widespread physical inactivity among children and adults, as people have become more dependent on automobiles to get just about everywhere. Sprawl means single land-use development, where the essential components of the built environment are separated by large distances from each other. Sprawl means automobile dependency. Sprawl not only is unhealthy, sprawl kills.

By using smart growth principles and new community designs, brownfields projects can improve public health by promoting routine physical activity and providing urban green infrastructure. The concept and goal is active living by design. The national epidemics of obesity and related diseases make brownfields sites more valuable than ever before. Rather than just building residences, preferred projects provide compact, walkable communities with an emphasis on mixed land-use development that provide jobs, shopping, mixed-income/higher density housing, and ample green space. Streets are designed for pedestrians, providing safe and attractive pathways for people on foot or using bicycles. There is substantial demand for such housing. Consumer research has found that over one-third of people want an alternative to sprawl, but supply of such alternatives falls far short of demand. This means that land is more valuable than ever, especially in geographic areas where developable land is at a premium. Under these conditions, cleanup costs are more acceptable and offer more value-added. Developers would be wise to sell the health benefits of mixed-use projects on brownfields sites. They could get local health officials to support such projects

 

Brownfield redevelopment is key to public health, increase employment and economy and stopping urban sprawl, cancer, disease, obesity, and sedentary death syndrome.

 

Hirschhorn 2 (Joel S. Hirschhorn. writer. senior staffer for U.S. Congress and National Governors Association, and full professor at University of Wisconsin, Madison. National Governors Association. BROWNFIELDS PROJECTS TO IMPROVE PUBLIC HEALTH) online: http://www.nga.org/Files/pdf/1102BROWNFIELDS.pdf

Brownfield cleanups have numerous public health benefits, even though they may be difficult to quantify, although addressing specific exposures and risks from site contaminants is usually done to justify cleanups. State cleanup programs often demonstrate their effectiveness in terms of increased employment and other socio-economic measures, without emphasizing the concomitant public health benefits, aside from any cleanup. The medical community has now recognized the enormous importance of regular physical activity. In fact, physical activity is now the single best indicator of a person’s health. But some 70 percent of adults are physically inactive. Physical inactivity is a major cause of a host of health impacts, including: heart disease, colon cancer, osteoporosis, diabetes, depression, hypertension, and obesity. Medical professionals have coined the term “Sedentary Death Syndrome,” because there are some 300,000 preventable deaths a year resulting from the various impacts of physical inactivity, especially obesity. The dominant “sprawl” form of land development has resulted in widespread physical inactivity among children and adults, as people have become more dependent on automobiles to get just about everywhere. Sprawl means single land-use development, where the essential components of the built environment are separated by large distances from each other. Sprawl means automobile dependency. Sprawl not only is unhealthy, sprawl kills. By using smart growth principles and new community designs, brownfields projects can improve public health by promoting routine physical activity and providing urban green infrastructure. The concept and goal is active living by design. The national epidemics of obesity and related diseases make brownfields sites more valuable than ever before. Rather than just building residences, preferred projects provide compact, walkable communities with an emphasis on mixed land-use development that provide jobs, shopping, mixed-income/higher density housing, and ample green space. Streets are designed for pedestrians, providing safe and attractive pathways for people on foot or using bicycles. There is substantial demand for such housing. Consumer research has found that over one-third of people want an alternative to sprawl, but supply of such alternatives falls far short of demand.

Replacing brownfields with parks reduces crime rates by reducing stress

Banzhaf, McCormick 7 (Spencer and Eleanor, Associate Professor of Economics, Georgia State U and Rsch assistant, Jan 8, “Hazardous Waste; Renewable Resources and Conservation: Land Use; Distributional Effects”, http://yosemite.epa.gov/EE/epa/eed.nsf/WPNumberNew/2007-02?OpenDocument)

One plausible mechanism for cleanup of LULUs to reduce crime is the “broken windows” effect (Wilson and Kelling 1982, Kelling and Coles 1996). The broken windows theory is that small changes in the physical environment, such as fixing broken windows and removing graffiti, can reduce the rates of more serious violent and property crimes. Cleaning up pollution, removing abandoned buildings, and so forth may fit into this category. An intriguing potential second mechanism has been suggested by Kuo and Sullivan (2001). They point to psychological evidence that brain activity differs when people are in green spaces, in a way that is more restful and reduces stress. They hypothesize that this psychological effect, as well as the congregation of people around green spaces, may reduce crime. In support of this theory, they find that crime rates are lower in greener sections of a major Chicago public housing development, even though residents were randomly assigned to apartments. If brownfields and other LULUs have the opposite effect, cleaning them up may reduce crime rates. If the land is reused as a park or other green space, the effect would be more direct.

 

Crime in the US results in more deaths, injuries and property damage than all natural disasters combined

The Disaster Center 6 (updated in 2006, http://www.disastercenter.com/crime/)

Crime in the United States accounts for more death, injuries and loss of property then all Natural Disasters combined. The Disaster Center is pleased to be able to provide you with access to the statistics of crime compiled by the Federal Bureau of Investigation.

Crime rates are on the rise in some states, while they are declining in others. While helpful, even criminal background checks can't prevent crime rates from rising in certain areas.

When you experience a crime it can make you respond in ways that you might not understand. In that crisis situation you may react in ways that conflict with the assumptions you have created about your self. At the time of the crime you may feel a sense of helplessness, fear and anger. Afterward you may have a hard time relating the experience to the context of the assumptions of your life. A conflict often develops between your idea of the world before the crime and your idea of the world after the disaster.

On top of this the victims and their relatives often experience financial problems, and time is often lost from work to handle the legal, insurance and personal problems associated with being a victim. The trauma associated with any crime often makes it hard for victims to cope with normal daily routines. And the victims of crime are frequently blamed by their friends for not being more careful. The trauma continues as victims of crime often find themselves ignored by law enforcement, and confused by the court system Approximately thirteen million people (approximately 5% of the U.S. population) are victims of crime every year. Approximately one and a half million are victims of violent crime.

 

 

 

Vancouver proves, brownfields redevelopment effective

Bjelland 5 (Mark D, Visiting Fulbright Scholar, City and Regional Planning, Cardiff University, U.K., “Brownfields, Globalisation, and the Livable City”, http://www.keg.lu.se/ngm/html/papers/paper_bjelland.pdf )

Much has been written about Vancouver's dramatic transformation into a global city under the influence of Pacific Rim capital (Olds 1995), its achievements in high quality urban design (Punter 2003), and its beauty and livability as a city. What has not been fully appreciated in these accounts is the remarkable fact that the stage for these dramatic urban landscape transformations has been the city’s collection of derelict, inner-city industrial land—the same types of brownfield sites that remain mired in economic disinvestment, environmental contamination, and liability troubles in many U.S., Canadian, and European cities. In Vancouver, high standards of urban planning and design, strong restrictions on greenfield development, strategic public-sector investments, and massive levels of foreign investment in real estate have led to the creation of vibrant, environmentally superior urban communities that are widely celebrated urban spaces on what were once derelict, contaminated industrial lands. Being on the receiving end of large transnational flows of well-heeled people and investment capital, combined with strong leadership in planning and urban design, has helped create a vibrant, livable metropolitan region where brownfields are scarce and readily managed.

 

Brownfield redev into parks, public gardens, installation art key to rejuvenating a community, attracting tourists

 

Kushner 00 (James A, Professor of Law , Southwestern Law School, “EVOLVING VOICES IN LAND USE LAW: A FESTSCHRIFT IN HONOR OF DANIEL R. MANDELKER”, Washington University Journal of Law & Policy, Wash. U. J.L. & Pol'y 849, Lexis)

In order to stabilize a declining neighborhood, city, or region, or to rejuvenate stagnant communities, the community must create an environment that both attracts investment and generates a sense of community. This article looks to several communities undergoing urban revival and notes that a key element to their revival is their utilization of projects and activities to create a sense of excitement and optimism among the community's population. This excitement can be generated by activities such as historic preservation, installation of public art, expansion of public squares and gardens, or the development of unique projects that reflect the community's history and offer recreation for residents and tourists. These projects might not appear to be sound financial investments in job creation. Instead, their value is indirectly related to economic development. Projects that can excite local interest, attract tourists, and give an image of an attractive and stimulating destination make up this infrastructure for redevelopment that I call "social sustainability." Social sustainability will differ for each community: in some communities it will reflect the region's cultural and economic history; other communities will highlight their geographic resources; [*852] while still other communities might structure their social sustainability around sports and recreation or arts and entertainment. This article looks to several communities in Germany, including Berlin, Wittenberg, and the cities that comprise the Ruhr Valley, for examples of social sustainability.

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if you can get by that whole T thing here are some cards that might help you out, maybe you could run it with a brownfields spin

 

Aren't Brownfields usually contaminated by hazardous industrial materials? Wiki:

 

Generally, brownfield sites exist in a city's or town's industrial section, on locations with abandoned factories or commercial buildings, or other previously polluting operations. Small brownfields also may be found in many older residential neighborhoods. For example, many dry cleaning establishments or gas stations produced high levels of subsurface contaminants during prior operations, and the land they occupy might sit idle for decades as a brownfield.

 

It doesn't exactly sound like the type of land you'd want to turn into a park, because industrial chemicals, which are almost never good for you, have a nasty way of sticking around even after they've been cleaned up.

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In all seriusness, you can add a global warming advantage, because greenspace eats CO2.

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That's true... and try to use a card that says parks are social services... because I assume there will be a lot of definitions of what social services are (t's) next year... But it's a good idea in the making...

 

Advantages Maybe?

1. Global warming... I though that was a good idea...

2. Crime... Maybe by getting communities together in a serene and fun-loving sort of place you reduce crime...

3. Fitness, Parks encourage people to be active

 

Keep in mind these are just a few ideas... feel free to reject them... But I think a parks aff would be a good idea.

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K, im writing this sucker. anyone who wants to help IM me.

 

norris528e.

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why cant states solve- whats the fed key warrant

 

national parks maybe? (do states have control or does the National Park Service)

the perm is easy on this aff though

spending effects are less apparent at the federal level than the states, because states do direct services

 

maybe there is a good obesity advantage

http://www.cross-x.com/vb/showthread.php?t=990877&highlight=hamster+wheels

Edited by NickyNeu

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T (Social Services)

 

1) Definition Services generally provided by the government that help improve people's standard of living; examples are public hospitals and clinics,... clean water supply, garbage collection, electricity, and telecommunications. UNESCO 2000 http://www.unesco.org/education/tlsf/TLSF/theme_c/mod13/www.worldbank.org/depweb/english/modules/glossary.htm#s

 

2) Standards:

Fairness

Predictability

Common usage

Supranational usage (World Standard)

framer's intent

Ground

 

3) T is not a voter (expand here, I'm tired)

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Child abuse impact (if you can find a econ adv)

 

http://www.hanscom.af.mil/news/story.asp?id=123144650 (4/16/09)

 

Across the United States, social services agencies are witnessing a significant increase in cases of domestic violence and child abuse, neglect. A mounting number of families are being impacted by the economic crisis and the correlation between financial stressors and maltreatment is becoming more and more apparent as evidenced by the soaring number of calls to crisis hotlines, emergency shelter admissions and utilization of social services agencies.

 

More than three million cases of child abuse are reported to authorities annually in the United States, according to Childhelp USA, a national child abuse prevention organization. For every incident of child abuse or neglect that is reported, it is estimated that two go unreported. An estimated four children a day die from abuse. Childhelp USA receives 200,000 calls annually on their National Child Abuse Hotline and by the end of 2008 had seen the number increase by about 10 percent.

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You could use some kritikal stuff from Bikes (UT file) aff as far as restructuring social space if you want to get into that debate.

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you might have some issues/advantages based on where the land comes from

 

 

and i am getting conflicting information on how much of an impact "extra-T" has on the round, could somebody clarify?

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and i am getting conflicting information on how much of an impact "extra-T" has on the round, could somebody clarify?

 

We ran Brownfields in practice round and someone used Ex-T on us. The explanation that you should give to the judge is that as long as your advantages don't come solely from helping those outside people living in poverty, you should be okay.

 

Honestly though, it's kind of hard to judge the outcome of Extra-T without knowing what advantages you're talking about...And how the Mandate is worded.

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Btw, does anyone have any recent Brownfields Inherency? The one in our case is from July 8, 2009. Anyone have anything newer? *crosses fingers*

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Yeah, I'm curious how the stimulus didn't at least make a dent in either a) parks or B) brownfields.

 

Of course w/ the right piece of inherency evidence--thats just a decent non-unique for the 2ac.

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