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Gambling rehab for an aff, just a thought.

So:

Is it topical?

Is it advantageous?

Does it have solvency?

Any other thoughts?

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I wonder if gambling rehab for native americans is a possibility (i don't know if they are the ones gambling in their casinos)

 

Back to your original idea. In terms of advantages/disadvantages there are people on both sides of the "gambling at native american casinos good for native americans" vs. "gambling at NA casinos bad for native americans and their economies" I think the $$$ goes to tribal leaders and not as much to the people. I imagine that most income increases for individual NA is marginally offset by NA gambling away their money.

 

I imagine you could leverage some 1) savings 2) self-esteem advantages--could help solve root causes for addiction.

 

I wonder if there is a potential financial counseling add-on.

 

I would look into Thomas Szaz and anti-psychiatry on the negative. To answer that--This isn't topical, but you could shift the type of service that people are given in the SQ--arguably a service that is counterproductive isn't a service.

 

Gambling could also serve as a metaphor for the current state of the global economy (aka the wall street disaster).

 

My initial search yielded these gambling research resources.

 

This book from the NAP may yield some gambling impacts. (see the table of contents on the right side)

 

My guess is that the Nevada economy disad (and New Jersey) would be inevitable. It would probably also effect the cruise industry and the overall tourism industry. I think getting turns to "tourism key to economy" or just "tourism bad" could be key. (they are probably environmental + globalization bad type impacts. tourism = co2 too)

 

>>>Such costs include traffic congestion, demand for more public infrastructure or services (roads, schools, police, fire protection, etc.), environmental effects, displacement of local residents, increased crime, and pathological or problem gambling. To the extent that pathological gambling contributes to bankruptcy and bad debts, these increase the cost of credit throughout the economy

 

Bankruptcy is an advantage--clearly I would get as many internals in the the economy debate as I could.

 

Organized crime is another internal into the economy.

 

I imagine gambling contributes to depression, which is another internal into job loss + the economy.

 

I think, though in the native american context its probably easier to make some of these claims.

Edited by nathan_debate

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You'd think that it'd be more beneficial to get natives to stop drinking - that might give them disincentive to gamble anyways

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Native Americans on reservations which have Casinos generally have a much higher drug problem than the rest of society.

 

You could conceivably go with drug trafficking, or disease through dugs (ie needle sharing) adv.

 

I'd go with a protestant work ethic adv. Max Weber ftw.

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I wonder if gambling rehab for native americans is a possibility (i don't know if they are the ones gambling in their casinos)

 

It depends on a few things -

 

A. Some casino's don't want other members of their nation gambling in their own casino's.

 

B. Casino's on native american reservation land normally have a high number of same-nation hiring rate. Casino's don't allow their employee's to gamble.

 

 

Native Americans on reservations which have Casinos generally have a much higher drug problem than the rest of society.

 

You could conceivably go with drug trafficking, or disease through dugs (ie needle sharing) adv.

 

I'd go with a protestant work ethic adv. Max Weber ftw.

 

They have a higher poverty rate, higher diabetes rate and a higher alcoholism rate but their drug rates are really not that high. Most nations are pushing hard for sober-free reservations and they are doing a decently good job of it. The issue comes with a lack of federal funding for their rehab programs.

 

However, I can see the 2AR in these debates:

 

"It's a gamble to vote negative in this round..."

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This could be a really excellent AFF. There is a ton of literature on Southeast Asian communities and problem gambling - how it directly leads to poverty and/or exacerbates financial situations for already struggling families, issues of immigration, culture, and gambling, how gambling in these communities have increased since the recession, and a myriad of reasons why it should be addressed through national policy.

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Gambling rehab for an aff, just a thought.

So:

Is it topical?

Is it advantageous?

Does it have solvency?

Any other thoughts?

 

I had this same idea...but I'm not really sure what you could as for an actual plan

I researched it a little while back and found a lot of gambling->poverty links but...I didn't find any Affirmative that looked promising enough to cut a case for

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Apparently doctors don't screen for it.....

http://www.ncpgambling.org/files/public/NAPS07HealthAwareness.pdf

 

The last 15 or so links here are USA based policy centers (although they are more one to one and not oriented toward government solutions)

http://www.responsiblegambling.org/en/resources/other.cfm

 

p. 305 to 307 is interesting here in terms of lack of a definition for what "problem gambling" is

http://www.divisiononaddictions.org/html/reprints/renomodel.pdf

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An interesting metaphor to think about in terms of gambling (kind of anti-capital):

 

Dreamland

Directed by Lisanne Skyler

Produced by Greg Little

 

From state lotteries to Mississippi paddleboats to Indian casinos, America's obsession with the promise of gambling can be seen everywhere. DREAMLAND takes a sharp but disarming approach in examining the romance of gambling, and reveals the decidedly unromantic reality.

 

http://www.gamblingproblem.net/

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Pathological gaming wastes billions in tax dollars + police resources (another external impact) (Amazing stats, wow)

http://www.norc.org/NR/rdonlyres/5C44C702-3598-453A-8CCD-AFB05ACC8822/0/GIBSFinalReportApril1999.pdf

 

Arrests

Pathological and problem gamblers account for about $1,000 each ($1,250 and $960, respectively) in excess lifetime police costs. Almost one-third of each group has been arrested or detained by the police at some time in their life (their expected rates are about 19 and 15 percent, respectively). Based on the survey, pathological and problem gamblers had been arrested about 3.3 and 1.6 times, if they had ever been arrested. In 1992 (the most recent national data available), police spent $41.3 billion to make 14 million arrests (about $2,900 per arrest; U.S. Dept. of Commerce 1998). Thus, the 32

percent of pathological gamblers with arrest histories had about $10,000 in lifetime arrest costs. However, the $10,000 must be prorated across all pathological gamblers, and further adjusted for the 19-percent expected rate of arrest in this population. Thus, the average cost per pathological gambler is $10,000 H (32% ! 19 %), which equals $1,250.

 

Plan would decrease welfare dependency

http://www.norc.org/NR/rdonlyres/5C44C702-3598-453A-8CCD-AFB05ACC8822/0/GIBSFinalReportApril1999.pdf

 

Another mechanism for adverse consequences is for one to engage in gambling at times and places that are inappropriate given one’s responsibilities; adverse outcomes could include a decline in job performance and additional costs to employers, job loss, lost

wages, and reliance on Unemployment Insurance and/or other social welfare programs.

Studies of pathological gamblers in treatment have looked at a variety of the potential impacts on the workplace, but they have been limited by not having comparison populations. Such studies have examined narrow aspects such as lateness or missing work in order to gamble as well as gambling while on the job, while broader impacts have included job loss and unemployment. While it is possible to develop cost estimates from such data, they may present an inaccurate picture, since workers in general are sometimes late and miss work, or use work time for personal purposes.

 

Plan decreases prison overcrowding (sorry I don't have an internal link or impact)

http://www.norc.org/NR/rdonlyres/5C44C702-3598-453A-8CCD-AFB05ACC8822/0/GIBSFinalReportApril1999.pdf

 

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Pathological and problem gamblers in treatment populations often reveal that they have stolen money or other valuables in order to gamble or pay for gambling debts (Lesieur 1998). Nearly half (46 percent) of GA participants in Wisconsin reported they had ever stolen something to gamble, and 39 percent had been arrested (Thompson et al. 1996).

The GA survey in Illinois found that 56 percent had stolen to gamble (Lesieur and Anderson 1995).

 

Gambling leads to crime/imprisonment (overcrowding?)

http://www.norc.org/NR/rdonlyres/5C44C702-3598-453A-8CCD-AFB05ACC8822/0/GIBSFinalReportApril1999.pdf

 

Table 15 below shows that those with more gambling symptoms have much higher rates of lifetime arrests and imprisonment. About one-third of problem and pathological gamblers reported having been arrested, compared to 10 percent of low-risk gamblers and only 4 percent of nongamblers. About 23 percent of pathological gamblers and 13

percent of problem gamblers have ever been imprisoned. Again, these rates are much higher than rates for low-risk gamblers and nongamblers (4 and 0.3 percent,respectively).

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Only 3% get professional help

http://www.norc.org/NR/rdonlyres/5C44C702-3598-453A-8CCD-AFB05ACC8822/0/GIBSFinalReportApril1999.pdf

 

There have been no national studies on the issue of pathological gambling treatment. Volberg (1998) estimates that only about 3 percent of current pathological gamblers obtain professional treatment in a given year (not including participation in self-help groups like GA). This rate of treatment access is much lower than rates for persons with current drug addiction (about one-third), alcoholism (about 15 to 20 percent), and other

mental disorders (ranging from about 40 to 80 percent). In Oregon, Volberg found that public clinics had about 600 documented patients and/or affected family members per year, compared to a current estimated prevalence of about 20,000 pathological gamblers.

 

Similarly, no substantial data exist regarding costs for treating pathological gambling. Inpatient treatment facilities generally keep patients for several weeks, at a cost of up to $10,000; outpatient providers treat patients for several months or more, often taking on patients after they leave 24-hour care. Volberg (1998) reports that in Oregon, patients generally receive care for up to 6 months in outpatient addiction treatment centers

(similar to the course of treatment for alcohol and drug addiction), although due to client dropout, the average duration of treatment per patient is about 3 months. Costs in these centers runs about $70 per week (Mark et al. 1998), suggesting average costs per patient of between $900 and $1000.

 

In sum, about 3 percent of pathological gamblers seek care in a given year, with an average cost per person of $1,000. If one uses these data to estimate the cost of treatment in a year, then the annual treatment cost per pathological gambler is about $30. It is assumed that most problem gamblers do not seek treatment unless or until they advance

to pathological. While in a given year a pathological gambler may have a 3 percent probability of entering treatment, over a period of pathological gambling there may be a greater probability that they will seek care.

 

Economic cost of gambling is between 28 and 40 BILLION dollars

http://www.norc.org/NR/rdonlyres/5C44C702-3598-453A-8CCD-AFB05ACC8822/0/GIBSFinalReportApril1999.pdf

 

The costs of problem and pathological gambling minus transfers are $1,050 and $560 per year, and $10,550 and $5,130 per lifetime, respectively. When these sums are multiplied by the estimated prevalence of pathological and problem gamblers from the combined RDD+patron data file (which was used for the cost calculations), they translate into annual costs of about $4 billion per year, and $28 billion on a lifetime basis. If transfers to the gambler from creditors and other taxpayers are included, the costs rise to about $5

billion per year and $40 billion per lifetime.

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Interesting FYI on the Aff + states counter plan

http://govinfo.library.unt.edu/ngisc/reports/ngisc-frr.pdf

 

The Commission recommends to state governments and the federal government that states are best equipped to regulate gambling within their own borders with two exceptions—tribal and Internet gambling.[/b

 

 

 

Side note: I think where the NCAA, NBA, and college sports are concerned (aka sports in general) the federal government should definitely have a role.

The alternative of criss-crossing regulations for where a team play or where a beter is located is positively absurd.

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Interesting FYI on the Aff + states counter plan

http://govinfo.library.unt.edu/ngisc/reports/ngisc-frr.pdf

 

The Commission recommends to state governments and the federal government that states are best equipped to regulate gambling within their own borders with two exceptions—tribal and Internet gambling.[/b

 

 

 

Side note: I think where the NCAA, NBA, and college sports are concerned (aka sports in general) the federal government should definitely have a role.

The alternative of criss-crossing regulations for where a team play or where a beter is located is positively absurd.

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okay...okay

haha

i understand that there are harms arguments but what would the plan be?

solvency?

 

i'm just not sure if you can solve for a psychological problem...

kinda of hard to achieve

but i could be wrong

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Gamling, Internet Gambling, and Mental Health Services for veterans were all cases run on the mental health topic. I think it was about 4 years ago--don't quote me.

 

The main stock argument against mental health affs is Thomas Szaz and Anti-psychiatry. It has an implied case turn and harms takeout which go along with it. It also works well with 1) social control/libertarianism 2) dependency 3)state bad arguments. Of course the later three will be run against many affs.

 

Two more resources for harms cards (and maybe takeouts and solvency cards)

Internet Gambling

http://www.gao.gov/new.items/d0389.pdf

 

This is from 2000: The Impact of Gambling

http://www.gao.gov/archive/2000/gg00078.pdf

 

Gambling was also run on the college native americans topic about 4 to 6 years ago. The case went both ways...I think give more control to the tribal leaders for the casinos (don't know exact nature) and some sort of treatment type affirmative.

 

So yes, there is solvency. I imagine some of the NA solvency on LNexis.

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Gambling good--helps local economy and provides 2.9 billion in government revenue--multiple warrants.

http://www.gao.gov/archive/2000/gg00078.pdf

(Government Accounting Office in 2000, p.25)

 

NGISC reported that local officials in jurisdictions where casinos were

located testified about the increased revenues and community

improvements made possible with the advent of gambling in their

communities. It also cited the testimony of tribal members who said that,

in addition to new jobs, legalized gambling provided their communities

with improved hospitals, clinics, schools, and the capital to invest in new

businesses.

 

NGISC also reported that an Arthur Anderson study conducted for the

American Gaming Association reported that, in 1995, the casino industry

paid a total of $2.9 billion in taxes to federal, state, and local jurisdictions.

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Gambling revenue critical to state funding of education

(Government Accounting Office 2000, same cite, p.25)

 

Another NGISC contractor, Clotfelter and Cook, reported that in 1997, net

revenue (sales minus prizes and operating costs) from state lotteries

totaled about $11 billion. The contractors reported that the average net

revenue state treasuries received from the average dollar wagered on

lotteries was 33 cents. The firm reported that, in 1997, lottery revenue from

the 38 state lotteries4 represented about 2.2 percent of own-source general

revenue5 compared with about 25 percent for state general sales taxes and

25 percent for state income taxes. According to Clotfelter and Cook, 16 of

the 38 states earmarked all or part of lottery revenues for education, 10

allocated lottery revenue to a general fund, and the other states used the

lottery funds for a wide range of purposes including parks and recreation,

tax relief, economic development, sports stadiums, and police and fireman

pensions.

 

 

 

Can impact this argument with Econ impact or hege impact scenario (find an old state spending tradeoff disad from your 2ac file)

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= homelessness

(Government Accounting Office 2000, same site, p. 29)

 

Similarly, gambling disorders possibly contribute to the homeless

population. Three surveys of homeless populations cited by NGISC

(including one conducted by the Atlantic City Rescue Mission) reported

that 18 to 33 percent of homeless individuals cited gambling as a

contributing factor or cause of their homelessness. NGISC cautioned that

it remains unclear whether homelessness is actually caused by gambling or

other factors related to addictive behavior.

 

 

Decent dehum or poverty impact scenario. This could also be an add on, except that it won't answer C/P very well (ie no reason why USFG = key)

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$45 billion per year in economic gains lost

 

(Government Accounting Office in 2000, p. 29)

http://www.gao.gov/archive/2000/gg00078.pdf

 

Concerning a direct cost associated with the pathological gambler, NGISC

reported that in 1998, NORC estimated that the annual average cost to

society for problem and pathological gamblers for job loss, unemployment

and welfare benefits, poor physical and mental health, and gambling

disorder treatments were approximately $1,200 per pathological gambler

and $715 per problem gambler. NGISC also stated that NORC further

estimated that the lifetime costs (bankruptcy, arrests, imprisonment, legal

fees for divorce, and so forth) for problem gamblers were $5,130 per

gambler and $10,550 per pathological gambler. NORC concluded that

overall, pathological and problem gamblers in the United States cost

society approximately $5 billion per year and an additional $40 billion in

lifetime costs for productivity reductions, social services, and creditor

losses.

 

NORC’s analyses on the economic costs associated with problem and

pathological gambling, reported in NGISC’s report, isolated the effect of

problem and pathological gambling net of other effects, such as drug and

alcohol abuse. NORC reported that it compared economic cost estimates

from its study with measurable costs of other sources of morbidity,

mortality, and productivity loss and found that while the annual economic

cost estimated for problem and pathological gambling in 1998 was $5

billion, 1995 estimates were $110 billion for drug abuse and $166.5 billion

for alcohol abuse.[/b] According to NGISC, NORC focused on a small number of tangible consequences and, as a result, its figures on problem and pathological gambling must be taken as minimums.

 

 

 

??? Lopez or silk impact?????

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Another internal to patriarchy...and dehum

 

Gambling leads to prostitution

(Government Accounting Office in 2000, http://www.gao.gov/archive/2000/gg00078.pdf)

Both city and county officials said that the presence of casinos had a great

impact on prostitution. One official commented that the casinos do not

generally draw families, and this creates an atmosphere conducive to

prostitution. Another official said the impact of the casinos on prostitution

is now decreasing. As shown in table II.5, analysis of UCR prostitution data

from 1977 to 1997 shows that the arrest rate for prostitution crimes based

on Atlantic City’s unadjusted population increased in some of the years

between 1977 and 1997 and remained higher than the state and national

levels.

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I have seen a lot of success with this aff and would love to trade some evidence or ideas with anyone interested in also running this case. Topicality is generally pretty easy to defeat with some specific tweaks to plan text and a good grasp of topicality theory. Proving significance takes a bit more work though. If anyone with any evidence to prove the high number of pathological gamblers or significant impacts of the issue and wants to share it would be great. I will be happy to share some solvency or T answers in return.

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To the extent that pathological gambling contributes to bankruptcy and bad debts, these increase the cost of credit throughout the economy

 

Bankruptcy is an advantage--clearly I would get as many internals in the the economy debate as I could.

 

Do you have any evidence on the bankruptcy idea? I like the impact, but i have been having some trouble finding well cited evidence on the problem.

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