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hylanddd

National High School Debate Community Once Again Rejects Space as Topic Choice

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Hi, Hot off the Press:

 

After a period of discussion of the five topic areas, states conducted balloting in September and October. Results were sent to NFHS headquarters by October 20, 2008.

 

Two final topics, Poverty and Health Care, were selected as the favorites.

 

110 Space – Topic I

87 Health Care – Topic 2*

110 Immigration – Topic 3

155 Federal Elections – Topic 4

108 Poverty – Topic 5*

 

(Remember, the voting is like golf - it's the low scores that win)

 

Well..here's hoping that space will be considered for 2010. Sorry, if the thread title sounds bitter. I was really hoping that Space would be the choice - next to the arguments you find on a space topic, health care and poverty are so..well..boring........

 

H.

Edited by hylanddd

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Wow. I am so incredibly disappointed by this.

 

I will not be pleased if poverty wins. I can't imagine anything more painful than the number of bad K rounds I will judge. :(

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i personally would dread the inevitable plethora of variations of alternate causality on poverty....

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Health care seems worse. Even ignoring the fact that a lot of cases could be somewhat un-inherent partway through the season (think: either candidate's plan for health care reform), there would be... what? Five cases at most being run?

Depth over breadth, I guess...

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I voted for Immigration. Space was my second choice. I like topics with easily accessible big impacts. I also think those topics have the best and most consistent K ground so they please all sides of the spectrum. I'm pretty bummed that two good topic areas missed by that small a margin.

 

I ranked the two topic areas we now have to choose from last and second to last. Poverty is pretty bad as a topic area. I suspect it will devolve into shallow socialism good/bad debates a lot. I already have flashbacks to Gilligan debates on the Africa topic. I am voting for it now because I don't understand how Healthcare would work as a policy debate topic and while some have tried to explain it to me I guess I just fear change. The largest issue I have with it, though, is that high school students do not care about health care. While it's enormously relevent to adults most kids do not think about it very often (I am not saying there aren't children without healthcare just that most policy debaters don't think about this issue very often in their lives). It will be difficult to get 8th and 9th graders psyched about debating over healthcare plans. I can at least sell poverty by appealing to their bleeding hearts.

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Health care seems worse. Even ignoring the fact that a lot of cases could be somewhat un-inherent partway through the season (think: either candidate's plan for health care reform), there would be... what? Five cases at most being run?

Depth over breadth, I guess...

Don't worry about it. Nothing will change. Trust me, I was 20 when I entrusted a Hillbilly from Arkansas with the presidency mainly because he promised to fix the health care system. It turns out, congress is filled with cowardly suckers of Satan's cock, and they won't do a thing to offend the insurance companies. The President can't fix that.

 

If reform happens, it will be to a system that makes more, not less, profits for insurers.

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Heph..lol..I was looking forward to space because I work for the world's largest technical society centered on the aerospace community (aeronautics/space, etc.) and being able to walk from my office to the office of our executive director (former Deputy of the Military Space Office - Undersecretary of the Air Force, not to mention the former Commander of the 45th Space Wing) to ask questions about space exploration, and tech trends was too tempting. Not to mention having access to the world's largest repository of technical, space oriented papers, etc..at the tips of my fingers..etc..etc...would have been nice.

 

But..besides the ways the topic would be good for me - I think it's an interesting topic. The technology is amazing, the impact areas are huge, the debates are actually fun - it would revive interest, perhaps, in aerospace at the 9-12 level, and perhaps create a few future engineers. I think the issues you get into in space are a lot more thrilling than listening to debates about parity, or socialism.

 

Hopefully space gets another chance.

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I wonder how most schools decide which topic to vote for. My coach didn't really care about policy, so she would just hand the ballots to my partner and me (the policy captains) and say 'fill this out.' Do most coaches give the students a say?

Edited by Fox Sans Socks

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Everyone I've talked to thinks space would be by far more interesting and more in depth than blippy K rounds involving foucault on health care/poverty, why such a decision? Who makes these decisions?

 

Glad I'm not debating next year!

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Who the hell votes for this? This is nowhere close to representative of the high school community's opinion. In the cross-x.com poll, space received by a huge 43% margin the most votes (58.84%) while health care got the least (6.38%), yet health care came pretty far ahead as the TOP PICK??? How?

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In other news, people on cross-x always bitch about how much the next topic is going to suck as it is being decided.

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someone tell me one fed key warrant for a social service aimed specifically at poverty reduction.

 

name one.

 

with this in mind (Resolved: The United States federal government should substantially increase social services for persons living in poverty in the United States.)....

 

there are lots of ways that this resolution is sweet.

 

A. Poverty is increasing. It is up 1.8 million from last year. That means that you get sweet systemic harms versus nuclear war debates. These debates are actually much better to judge than most debaters think and are also good to argue because of how the impact debates come down which also forces coaches to teach their debaters more of the basics.

 

B. Most state based services receive almost (if not more) 50% of their funding through government grants. States don't provide the other 50% either because of other mechanisms for funding (mainly large donations from private actors). That means, according to the resolution, that state cp's are a result of the affirmative anyways. Can the state pay for it? Sure...but then there are issues involving rainy day funds and whatnot.

 

C. The resolution doesn't mandate that the the services have to be FEDERAL which means that private actors (think catholic charities and salvation army) are perfect ways to enact the resolution while avoiding federalism.

 

D. Critiques of poverty are good: there are lots and lots of authors who talk about poverty as "the camp" and how our interaction with poverty can focus as a nexus of radical politics (think of zizeks declaration of universal human rights or Derrida's "New International" or zizek's critique of "things like this shouldn't just happen here, they shouldn't happen anywhere").

 

E. Capitalism bad versus state change will be great.

 

F. Use this social service instead of that service offers a amazing way to debate something that actually does effect millions of people on a daily basis.

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Q: But tom, what do poverty reducing measures entail?

 

A: Well random voice, it would include a spectrum of possibilities, however the most common arguments are how exclusion causes poverty. Here are some of the policies that could reduce poverty according to the Dept. of International Development.

Poverty reduction policies often fail to reach socially excluded groups unless they are specifically

designed to do so. This paper is about the challenges posed by social exclusion, and the ways

governments, civil society and donors can help to tackle them. These include:

• creating legal, regulatory and policy frameworks that promote social inclusion;

• ensuring that socially excluded groups benefit from public expenditure as much as other groups;

• improving economic opportunities and access to services for excluded groups;

• promoting their political participation in society, and their capacity to organise and mobilise

themselves;

• increasing accountability to protect citizens’ basic human rights; and

• tackling prejudice and changing behaviour.

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only B and C are actually responsive to the question. B is essentially "but the states get some government funding" -- i.e. grants that are completely distinct from the aff. C is interesting but the plan still must involve USFG action even if the services aren't USFG services.

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only B and C are actually responsive to the question. B is essentially "but the states get some government funding" -- i.e. grants that are completely distinct from the aff. C is interesting but the plan still must involve USFG action even if the services aren't USFG services.

 

not just some, but most. even if federal action is bad, state action would be terminally worse.

 

as for your complaint with c. historically, private actors are the quickest solution to fix poverty and with the wording of the resolution, they are the perfect target for funding. Terminally, private>federal>local>state is who really addresses poverty the quickest and most effective.

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Who the hell votes for this? This is nowhere close to representative of the high school community's opinion. In the cross-x.com poll, space received by a huge 43% margin the most votes (58.84%) while health care got the least (6.38%), yet health care came pretty far ahead as the TOP PICK??? How?

 

You presume patrons of cross-x.com constitute a representative sample of the high school coaching community who casts votes on the resolution. I can assure you there are many coaches who have never visited this site.

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Who the hell votes for this? This is nowhere close to representative of the high school community's opinion. In the cross-x.com poll, space received by a huge 43% margin the most votes (58.84%) while health care got the least (6.38%), yet health care came pretty far ahead as the TOP PICK??? How?

 

You seem to be under the delusion that the Cross-x.com community is in ANY way representative of the high school debate community. It is not. The students who travel the national circuit, or who ever attend any TOC-level tournament, for example, are less than 10% of all the high school debaters in the country.

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You presume patrons of cross-x.com constitute a representative sample of the high school coaching community who casts votes on the resolution. I can assure you there are many coaches who have never visited this site.

 

It's not a tally of coaches, it's states. So if you have 100 coaches active in Texas who vote one way, and 2 active in Montana, that is a tie because each state gets one vote. Additionally, I believe the NFL, NDCA and NCFL get a vote. That's it.

 

In addition to my very brief K lament above, I'm just hard pressed to believe there is a fed gov't key warrant on the poverty topic, the above posts aside. That means a states counterplan to solve whatever systemic problems exist and a politics disad is pretty sweet almost every round.

 

Space or immigration would have been ridiculously better than poverty.

 

Health care has it's own problems, I mean there is a decent chance that Obama wins with a supermajority and passes pretty substantial health care reform right after the votes are tallied in January, the saving grace there is that the lit is better and even if Obama passes 100% of his plan it's not like he advocates single payer or something, so there are still inherent affs.

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