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We Are Fucked: Agua.

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Water is a finite resource. The planet doesn’t make more. I’m not going to explain it to you, because you should have learned it in 6th grade. One would hope you paid attention when your teacher explained the rudimentary facts about the planet -- or that you had the slightest bit of intellectual curiosity to look into it. It’s called the water cycle, look it up.

 

Alright, here’s a pretty picture, dummy.

 

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Over the years, the population of the planet has adjusted to the water cycle. For instance, here in California, we expect snow and snow melt to occur regularly every year. We have built our water reservoir system around this pattern. Many other cities and countries around the world have done the same. Oh, and only 1% of the Earth's water supply is usable for domestic purposes.

 

But now, the situation is changing. Population is exploding. Idiots are moving in droves to places like Nevada. Pesticides and other toxins are polluting fresh water sources. Agriculture needs more and more water to feed more and more people. And worst of all, the Earth’s climate is rapidly changing, which is leading to a change in things like snowpack and snowmelt.

 

The snowpack is less and the snowmelt is occurring far too early. That means more rain goes directly into the sea and becomes salt water, instead of going into my tummy or washing my balls. Also, as glaciers melt, sea levels rise, which means salt water will encroach into once, isolated fresh water bodies. Basically, we are fucked. And I mean, in the poop shoot fucked.

 

Here’s how this is going to work: The wet will get wetter and the dry will get dryer. That means places where people should have never set up a city in the first place are screwed. Phoenix is an affront to God. It is a classic example of man thinking he is better than nature. Same goes for Las Vegas. Their existence is heinous and someday they will cease to exist as they currently do. It’s as if after thinking about the two most precious resources on Earth, the planners of those two cites said, “Hey, how can we do everything wrong?”

 

There should not be one golf course or lawn in Las Vegas. Not one. The English, who live in the dampest and most horrible place on Earth, created lawns. Vegas casinos already ship water by truck to run their fountains – and they should, because they are in a fucking desert. “Desert” comes from the Latin desertum, meaning "an unpopulated place."

 

1 a: arid land with usually sparse vegetation; especially: such land having a very warm climate and receiving less than 10 inches of sporadic rainfall annually b: an area of water apparently devoid of life.

2: a wild uninhabited and uncultivated tract.

3: a desolate or forbidding area.

 

 

4: A place where you should not build a city, you fucking retard. Las Vegas has the highest per-capita consumption of water in the world.

 

 

Currently, 70% of Vegas water use is for lawns and golf courses. Good luck keeping that shit green, you gluttonous fucks.

 

Now, you may be asking yourself, “Why is FearTheReaper so upset with Vegas?” Well, because Vegas is the Hummer of the United States. I think we should drag people out of their Hummers and push their faces onto the hot asphalt. They are using too much gasoline. They are cunts. Self absorbed, ignorant fucks. Vegas is to water what Hummers are to gasoline. It affects everyone because they are using a precious resource. Vegas takes much of its water from the Colorado River. Many other cities and towns use the water, as well. The river supplies water to 25 million people and 1 million acres of farmland.

 

This is where it gets nasty. States will be fighting over water and it will get ugly. Hell, the whole world will be fighting over water.

 

The Central Intelligence Agency says that by 2015, access to drinking water could be a major source of international conflict around the world.

 

 

In the US, we have it much better than the rest of the world. Unless people across the globe change their ways by 2025, two-thirds of the world's population will face water scarcity. We will add another 3 billion morons by 2050, which means we will need an 80% increase in water supplies. Ninety percent of wastewater produced in the Third World is discharged, untreated, into local rivers, streams, and coastal waters. Right now, every eight seconds, a child dies from drinking dirty water. Anyone see a problem?

 

I grew up in Northern California and it was engrained in me to hate Southern California. Now, I live in Los Angeles, but I fully understand I live in a self-involved population and that we are unwilling to make the sacrifices or even understand the harm we cause other areas. The battle between Northern and Southern California will intensify to the point that Los Angelenos may actually realize that San Franciscans hate them.

 

California would be two separate states if it weren’t for water. Southern California sucks every drop it can get from the North. They have even tried to put water in giant bags and ship it down south. Already, many Californians are suffering from a lack of potable water.

 

According to the state Department of Public Health, public drinking water systems deliver water with unsafe levels of contaminants to approximately 1 million people. The vast majority of this tainted water flows to the Central Valley - to little-known towns such as Monterey Park Tract, Mendota, Parlier, East Orosi, Cutler and Alpaugh - where residents can't fill a glass of tap water without fear of cancer, kidney disease and other health problems. These are some of our state's poorest towns, where median household incomes hover around $18,000.

 

 

Development is being been hampered by water, which means higher prices for houses and apartments.

 

“Businesses are telling us that they can’t get things done because of water,” said Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger.

 

 

No, they can’t. And it’s only the beginning. California has a 20-year supply of freshwater left. Then things start to get weird. The state will be torn apart. North vs. South.

 

It’s happening all over the country. Parts of the US are running out of clean drinking water. Lake Superior has dropped to its lowest level in 80 years. New Mexico has 10 years of fresh water left. Arizona imports all its drinking water. In the Southeast, one only needs to take a look at Lake Lanier to see the horrifying road ahead.

 

Lake Lanier is a man-made reservoir at the headwaters of the Chattahoochee River. It was built in the 1950s to prevent flooding in Atlanta and nearby areas. Now it is the source of water for nearly 3 million of Atlanta’s clowns. Last fall the water level sank to an all-time low.

 

The Army Corps of Engineers controls the water flow. The river runs through Atlanta, along the Georgia-Alabama border to Florida and finally, into the Gulf of Mexico. Georgia, Alabama, and Florida have been fighting over Lanier’s water for 20 years. In 2003, Georgia reached an agreement with the Corps to increase Atlanta’s supply by 65%. The other states went to court and in February, that plan was scrapped.

 

The Lanier fight has become ugly due to a 2-year drought that just ended. It led to bans on outdoor water use and car washing. Georgia was fucked. How bad was it? Well, Georgia State Legislators actually want to MOVE THE BORDER.

 

You read that correctly. Georgia recently decided to go after the water in Tennessee. The State Legislature actually created a commission that would try to move Georgia's border with Tennessee 1.1 miles north. That would allow Georgia to get their hands on part of the Tennessee River. According to the good people of Georgia, a surveyor made a mistake in 1818 and they want their shit back. How do you think that’s going to go?

 

Everyone wants the same water. It’s doable when there’s lots of rain falling from the sky, but when there isn’t – bad, bad news. Oh, and when water levels drop in reservoirs, that means toxins become more concentrated, which increases the possibility that a body of water will become unusable. How fucking sweet is that?

 

How happy of a country will we be when a few states are selling water at inflated prices, so people in other states can survive?

 

Ohio Lt.-Gov. Lee Fisher made headlines when he told an economic development summit that the Great Lakes region may be less than a decade away from selling water to other U.S. states in need.

 

"I think it's fair to say that we're going to see in the next decade states and other countries looking for ways to get access to our fresh water supply, and we're going to have to make some tough decisions about whether we want that to happen and, if so, how," Fisher said.

 

 

I wonder how Canada will feel about the US taking all that water? Basically, we’re fucked. There’s just not enough water to sustain our current situation. We will have to change – something Americans hate to do. That means it will get much worse before there is any improvement.

 

In the near future, in many areas, there will be no lawns. There will be no pools. Cars will be filthy. There will be a timer on your shower. Bottled water will be for the rich. Houses will have rain collectors. Rich people will have their own private water tower supplied by a private Canadian water company. You’re going to have one of these. You’ll keep a bucket next to your tub, where you’ll save water and use it to flush your toilet by force. If you boil eggs, you’ll save the water for your plants – that is, if you have plants.

 

Most of the nation will fight to get their hands on water from the more wet areas of the country. There just is not enough water to go around. As the population increases, cities will become less and less capable of dealing with a reduction in rainfall. Droughts will become more and more devastating. And that doesn't even take into account pollution.

 

FearTheReaper

 

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As someone who is from Las Vegas, I feel that I must point out a few errors.

 

First, your analysis that people in Vegas use a crapload of water is true. It just is. However, I find little evidence supporting the claim that Vegas has the highest per capita consumption of water on earth. The site you give makes this claim but has no sources sited or evidence to back it up.

 

Additionally, you claimed that 70% of all water used in Las Vegas is used for golf courses and lawns. That's straight up false. That 70% figure is 70% of all residential areas. Residential usage comprises 59% of total use. Adding that together with the figure of golf course usage, it comes out to 48.3% of all Vegas usage going to lawns and golf courses.

 

Lastly, the mapquest map you show is artificially green. If you zoom in, you'll that the vast majority of Vegas is grey and brown. It's a freaking desert. The map gives everything grey a sort of greenish look for some reason. I think it's the black streets blending with the grey buildings.

 

Now, I won't deny that Vegas-dwellers are a bunch of wasteful retards, but I gotta at least try to defend my town.

 

Very informative overall. It is true that water is very limited and we will soon start to see problems arising.

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The best article I ever read on water resource allocation was the July 2003 Economist special report "Priceless." The thesis is that most of the world's water problems could be solved by simply charging people its market value, rather than having the government give it away and subsidize wasteful uses. Only a preview page is on their site, but the full article is on Lexis. Highly recommended. I have it in txt format if anyone wants me to PM it to them.

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shouldn't it be "poop chute"?

I mean, I don't know about you, but my fecal material normally doesn't come out in projectile form.

Good eye.

 

Also, NPR's Justice Talking did a show on water back in February discussing Las Vegas, Atlanta, and other issues (including the problems of aging infrastructure that are starting to hurt even well-watered cities). Link: http://justicetalking.org/viewprogram.asp?progID=649

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The best article I ever read on water resource allocation was the July 2003 Economist special report "Priceless." The thesis is that most of the world's water problems could be solved by simply charging people its market value, rather than having the government give it away and subsidize wasteful uses. Only a preview page is on their site, but the full article is on Lexis. Highly recommended. I have it in txt format if anyone wants me to PM it to them.

 

Except you're still commodifying an unrenewable resource... Logic would dictate that even if you were able to curb the consumption of water in the short run by taxing it we will still outstrip our planet's capacity to provide it eventually. Especially if you factor in population growth, and our society's perverse desire to consume way more than is necessary...

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Except you're still commodifying an unrenewable resource... Logic would dictate that even if you were able to curb the consumption of water in the short run by taxing it we will still outstrip our planet's capacity to provide it eventually. Especially if you factor in population growth, and our society's perverse desire to consume way more than is necessary...
Water may be a "scarce" resource in economic terms, but it is not, strictly speaking, unrenewable or exhaustable. There will always be water, the questions are: 'how difficult is it to make the water potable?' and 'how difficult will it be to deliver to the end-user?'

 

We have the technology to make virtually any water supply potable, even polluted ocean water, through distillation and reverse osmosis. But the costs of the technologies are high, and increase as the number of contaminants in the supply rise.

 

We will always be able to find or create potable water, but the argument The Economist makes is that the costs of doing so (and the costs of transporting the water to users) should be passed along in-full. If you can afford to have Pacific Ocean water desalinated and piped to the Nevada desert, then more power to you. If not, then move...

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Isn't this privatization idea by the Economist similar to the attempts by water companies to privatize water use in South America?

 

From what I remember, that didn't go over very well.

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Isn't this privatization idea by the Economist similar to the attempts by water companies to privatize water use in South America?

 

From what I remember, that didn't go over very well.

Well, there are still significant questions about price-gouging and anti-competitive practices in the prelude to Bolivia's water riots. While there's legitimate debate about privatization, I don't think any of its proponents support these tactics.

 

I, for one, am of the mind that water, like clean air, should never be denied to any human and ensuring affordable access to potable water is one of the responsibilities of government, but I'm all in favor of charging extra (perhaps even above market value as a disincentive) for frivolous uses like watering lawns in Vegas.

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Well, there are still significant questions about price-gouging and anti-competitive practices in the prelude to Bolivia's water riots. While there's legitimate debate about privatization, I don't think any of its proponents support these tactics.

 

I, for one, am of the mind that water, like clean air, should never be denied to any human and ensuring affordable access to potable water is one of the responsibilities of government, but I'm all in favor of charging extra (perhaps even above market value as a disincentive) for frivolous uses like watering lawns in Vegas.

 

The problem with the government guaranteeing clean water is exactly what was stated above, though. When it's free, there is even more waste than in a privatized system.

 

There's problems with either system.

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The problem with the government guaranteeing clean water is exactly what was stated above, though. When it's free, there is even more waste than in a privatized system.
I'm not arguing that water should be free, only that nobody should ever be denied water for essential uses (drinking, cooking, sanitation, etc.) on account of their ability to pay. I do not necessarily believe this right should be enforceable in all locations, if you choose to live where there is no water, then you should foot the extra cost or move.

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I'm not arguing that water should be free, only that nobody should ever be denied water for essential uses (drinking, cooking, sanitation, etc.) on account of their ability to pay. I do not necessarily believe this right should be enforceable in all locations, if you choose to live where there is no water, then you should foot the extra cost or move.

 

Right on, I agree wholeheartedly. Much of the waste that's being spoken about is the case of desert cities, so disincentivating them should be something that needs to be done.

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