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Praying to the Invisible Hand to Lower Gas Prices

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Group pumped to pray for relief from gas prices

Area sites chosen for divine intercession

http://toledoblade.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080620/NEWS10/806200333

 

By DAVID YONKE

BLADE RELIGION EDITOR

 

Politics, diplomacy, and economic strategies have not been able to halt the spike in gas prices, but a Maryland man is coming to Toledo today with a different plan: prayer.

"We've tried everything and just nothing seems to be working, so we're going to ask God to intervene and help us overcome this terrible crisis," said Rocky Twyman, founder of the Pray at the Pump Movement.

Mr. Twyman was invited by the Rev. Mike Fortune, pastor of Toledo's First Seventh-day Adventist Church, to lead "pray-ins" at local gas stations, host a citizens' forum, and participate in an all-night prayer session in hopes of bringing gas prices tumbling down like the walls of Jericho.

"Our leaders have not been able to solve this serious problem, man, so we have no choice but to turn it over to God and go into activist mode," Mr. Twyman said.

On the day gas prices jumped again - in the Toledo-area it was a hike of 20 cents a gallon to $4.09 for regular - Mr. Twyman and a group of eight Toledoans drove to Detroit yesterday to pray at the pumps in the Motor City, mecca of the automobile industry.

"I know the Creator can only change things through man," said Kay Kermode, 59, of Toledo, who took part in the Detroit prayer session.

"Being one of those human beings, I just feel it's a privilege to do that. I'm hoping and praying along with my church and other churches that God will intervene for us and help us."

She said she also is praying for the advances in alternative-energy sources.

"It's sitting out there and we're running out of oil. I wish we could use solar power," Ms. Kermode said.

Mr. Twyman designated today, the day before the official start of summer, as "National Pray Down the High Gas Prices Day."

His group is asking prayer warriors of all religious traditions to join hands at their local gas stations to pray at 9 a.m., noon, and 5 p.m.

Since Mr. Twyman founded the Pray at the Pumps Movement in April, he has led groups in praying and singing at gas stations in Baltimore, Washington, and San Francisco.

Mr. Fortune said he read about Mr. Twyman's San Francisco session, tracked him down via the Internet, and invited him to Toledo.

"It was sort of divinely oriented how we met," Mr. Twyman said.

"He found me and we just kind of connected. This is what God wants us to do at this particular point. It's really significant because these two states [Ohio and Michigan], they're critical states in the presidential election."

He invited Democratic presidential hopeful Barack Obama and Republican John McCain to join him in Toledo, but neither presidential candidate has responded.

Mr. Twyman said organizers hope representatives of all Toledo-area faith communities will join in, "praying to the God of their choice - Jesus, Allah, Jehovah, Buddha - for deliverance from these gas prices."

Mr. Fortune said he found Mr. Twyman's combination of faith and action to be inspiring, and believes concerned citizens should do whatever they can to curb rising gas prices because they hurt the neediest people the most.

"I just thought this is a really good idea," he said.

"If it's not affecting people now, it will in the future. I think we need to be proactive in something as a church instead of constantly reacting to things. … It makes sense as a pastor to ask God to help us help people."

While they believe in the power of prayer, Mr. Twyman and Mr. Fortune also are looking at more earthly options.

They are asking citizens to offer suggestions during the evening summit-prayer vigil, which starts at 7 p.m. and continues until 7 a.m. tomorrow at First Seventh-day Adventist Church.

Mr. Fortune said he called for an all-night prayer session because that's what Jesus did.

"Jesus prayed all night when it was serious; he prayed all night long," he said.

At the top of each hour, presenters will give talks on topics such as energy conservation, alternative fuels, and walkable communities, after which participants will pray, Mr. Fortune said.

"We're always treating the symptoms and not the cause," he said.

"It's like getting a headache and taking Advil. That's not the solution. As Christians, we need to do more. Environmentalism is not just for tree-huggers. That's a cop-out and I'm not going to have it. We want everybody who comes to the summit to leave better equipped and encouraged to treat the Earth better as stewards and not just consumers."

 

Information from the Associated Press was used in this report.

 

----------------

 

Personally, my favorite part is where he says that taking Advil is not the right way to get rid of a headache.

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Why is this offensive? Religious people are praying in hope of getting guidance and assistance: isn't that what they normally do? Personally, I think it's a good idea. Why not?

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The title of this thread implies an economic analysis or economy-oriented article would follow. I was sincerely disappointed.

 

EDIT: To the neg repper who has never read about Adam Smith or his invisible hand: You're unqualified to make judgments on the validity of this post.

 

ANOTHER EDIT TO NEG REP: LOL on the Cheney quote.

Edited by Banana
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Why is this offensive? Religious people are praying in hope of getting guidance and assistance: isn't that what they normally do? Personally, I think it's a good idea. Why not?

 

It's a dumb idea because people need to realize that it is their own fault for being unable to adapt to the higher prices. This country is primed for a major anal fucking due to our massive inefficiencies regarding resource usage. We've had ample opportunity, meaning boom years, to at least invest something in renewables and increase petroleum efficiency, but no, so many damn douchenozzles just had to have that SUV, HUMMER H2, or a massive Mini-van.

 

God ain't got shit to do with supply and demand

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Why is this offensive? Religious people are praying in hope of getting guidance and assistance: isn't that what they normally do? Personally, I think it's a good idea. Why not?

More than a billion people live on less than 1 U.S. Dollar per day. More than a billion humans don't have access to clean drinking water, a steady supply of food, stable work, or goods to spend their infrequent wages on. Billions of men, women, and children do not have access to basic medicines, basic health care, or basic education.

 

But heaven forbid some yuppie in the United States (where gas prices are still lower than in any other major industrialized country) has to decide between a new HDTV or keeping their Escalade gassed up...

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More than a billion people live on less than 1 U.S. Dollar per day. More than a billion humans don't have access to clean drinking water, a steady supply of food, stable work, or goods to spend their infrequent wages on. Billions of men, women, and children do not have access to basic medicines, basic health care, or basic education.

 

But heaven forbid some yuppie in the United States (where gas prices are still lower than in any other major industrialized country) has to decide between a new HDTV or keeping their Escalade gassed up...

 

Yes, because it's perfectly fair to stereotype and automatically assume they don't pray for those things as well.

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Why is this offensive? Religious people are praying in hope of getting guidance and assistance: isn't that what they normally do? Personally, I think it's a good idea. Why not?

 

if you don't see how selfish these people are for praying to god almighty so that fucking gas prices are lowered just so they can maintain a lucrative and environmentally harmful lifestyle, then i don't know what to say. Comparing gas prices with the walls of jericho?? are you fucking kidding me? This whole schtick is amoral if not downright sacrilegious.

 

Visually, just imagine the absurdity of "praying at the pump." If anything, it's just embarrassing.

Edited by gimmick account
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The title of this thread implies an economic analysis or economy-oriented article would follow. I was sincerely disappointed.

 

EDIT: To the neg repper who has never read about Adam Smith or his invisible hand: You're unqualified to make judgments on the validity of this post.

 

ANOTHER EDIT TO NEG REP: LOL on the Cheney quote.

 

Smith used the metaphor of the invisible hand to describe the mechanism by which a benevolent god intervened in human economic affairs to maximize good.

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I'm not really interested in arguing with you - but I hardly consider Smith's analysis to be religiously-oriented. OBVIOUSLY, his works are a discussion of economic laws.

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I wasn't arguing with you, I was correcting you. Smith was outlining a framework which he thought was natural, and a product of Creation.

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Yes, because it's perfectly fair to stereotype and automatically assume they don't pray for those things as well.

I have no doubt that if all the people currently griping about and praying for lower gas prices were to devote those energies to a more worthwhile cause, we could easily save 10 million lives.

 

I'm not saying that people shouldn't pray for lower fuels prices, just that those prayers should wait until the prayers to end hunger, poverty, war, etc. have been answered.

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oh, fps9_16 meant it's stereotypical to think the affluent wasps do not pray for the billion +

 

i thought it meant: it is stereotypical for the billion + to not pray for the HDTV or Escalade.

 

*a bit relieved*

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I wasn't arguing with you, I was correcting you. Smith was outlining a framework which he thought was natural, and a product of Creation.

 

You have a low threshold for the concept of a god, then. I appreciate the god of oil who, as a product of his creations, causes it to burn and move my car.

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I have no doubt that if all the people currently griping about and praying for lower gas prices were to devote those energies to a more worthwhile cause, we could easily save 10 million lives.

 

I'm not saying that people shouldn't pray for lower fuels prices, just that those prayers should wait until the prayers to end hunger, poverty, war, etc. have been answered.

 

They're not mutually exclusive: One can pray for both and hope for both to be answered, and act in order to do both. To say that higher gas prices aren't hurting our poor at the same time as other poor are suffering is idiotic. From a Christian standpoint, God is powerful and large enough to handle everything: the poor in Africa, the oil prices in America, your friend's sick family members. Compassion for one kind of suffering doesn't exclude compassion for another kind. The Christian standpoint is compassion for all kinds, those you find meaningful and those you don't.

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