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I wanted to make an email exchange I had with Claudia Schlosberg available to others.

 

 

 

 

 

RE: question about your "Immigrants' Access to Public Health" article cschlosberg@ascp.com [cschlosberg@ascp.com] You forwarded this message on 4/18/2008 9:59 AM.

 

 

Sent: Friday, April 18, 2008 7:21 AM To: Litman, Anna

Attachments:

 

 

 

Wow - this is news! Having neverbeen a formal debater - I am absolutely

fascinated.

 

If I am not mistaken, the definition of public health that I used in the

article came directly from the law. I'll need to review it more carefully

though when I have a bit more time. Also, you may want to look at the

Public Health Service Act or check out the CDC (Centers for Disease

Control) or the American Public Health Assoication - you may find

definitions there. Most public health officials would define public health

more broadly. Keep me posted!

 

 

 

I help you On Fri, April 18, 2008 12:39 am, Litman, Anna wrote:

> Thanks so much for your quick reply.

>

> Yes, you are very famous in the national high school debate community

> right now…I have traveled around the country this year to at least 15

> different tournaments this year and everyone knows about this argument

> (it’s actually called the “Schlosberg Argument”). So, all the debaters on

> my team were really excited to hear that I got a chance to talk to you.

>

> Debaters use different definitions for what is called a “topicality”

> argument—they say an affirmative case that sends condoms to Africa, for

> example, should lose the debate simply because it is outside the bounds of

> the topic and it isn’t responsive to the question posed by this year’s

> debate Resolution (which, according to some of them, only asks about

> treatment assistance and not prevention assistance). Since the term

> “public health” has no clear definition and can’t be found in any

> dictionary, it is difficult to determine what it actually means. So,

> Negative teams, instead of debating the merits of a specific Affirmative

> proposal, will sometimes argue that doing things like sending condoms to

> Africa is not allowed by this year’s resolution.

>

> It is very hard to find an article saying “public health” means only

> treatment, so some teams decided to take your article, which seemed to be

> talking about only the specific application of public health assistance in

> this immigration bill, and try to apply it to the debate topic about

> Africa.

>

> This is a version of the article:

>

> http://www.healthlaw.org/library/attachment.67503?print

>

> And the part that everyone references when making this argument is:

>

> All aliens, regardless of immigration status, are eligible for public

> health assistance funded through sources other than the Medicaid program.

> The public health assistance is limited to immunizations with respect to

> immunizable diseases and for testing and treatment of symptoms of

> communicable diseases whether or not such symptoms are caused by a

> communicable disease. As with emergency Medicaid, providers are not

> required to, and should not, verify the citizenship, nationality and

> immigration status of applicants for these services.

>

> I’m glad you agree that it is important to focus on the prevention aspects

> of public health assistance as well as treatment—this will help us a lot.

> Again, thanks so much for taking the time to clarify this!

> Anna

>

> ________________________________________

> From: cschlosberg@ascp.com [cschlosberg@ascp.com]

> Sent: Thursday, April 17, 2008 10:34 PM

> To: Litman, Anna

> Subject: Re: question about your "Immigrants' Access to Public Health"

> article

>

> Well - I had no idea that anything I wrote would become the subject of

> such intense debate. That article was written years ago and I am not sure

> I could even lay my hands on a copy. can you PDF it to me so I can look

> at what I wrote and thentry to answer your question. BTW - even without

> reviewing the article, I can tell you that from my perspective public

> health always must be defined more broadly than treatment. Treatment is

> the act of interveneing to address illness or a specific condition.

> Public health emphasizes keeping people healthy by preventing disease

> (e.g. distributing condoms, addressing sanitation issues, rats, nutrition

> etc.)

>

> PS. The interesting thing about disease is most don't discriminate. If

> we don't broadly address prevention (including among people who are

> undocumented), then our legal status will not be able to protect us from

> communicable diseased that spread through populations.

>

> Good luck and let me know who wins!

>

>

>

> On Thu, April 17, 2008 9:55 pm, Litman, Anna wrote:

>> Hi Ms. Schlosberg,

>>

>> My name is Anna Litman and I am a Junior at Greenhill High School in

>> Dallas, Texas. I am on the debate team, and the topic for this year is:

>>

>> Resolved: The United States federal government should substantially

>> increase its public health assistance to Sub-Saharan Africa.

>>

>> One of the difficulties in debating such a resolution is that the term

>> "public health" means different things to different experts. There seems

>> to be a consensus in most literature that public health assistance

>> includes things besides treating a disease with medicine; for example,

>> sending condoms to Africa in order to prevent the spread of AIDS. Many

>> debaters, I feel, have perverted the intent of the article you wrote

>> that

>> talked about public health assistance in the context of immigrants

>> ("Not-qualified Immigrants' Access to Public Health and Emergency

>> Services

>> After the Welfare Law"). They claim that you attempted to define the

>> phrase "public health assistance" in general, not in the specific

>> application of the bill. They conclude that the term public health can

>> only be applied to treatment and does not include prevention-focused

>> methods, such as disease surveillance and sending condoms. So, I was

>> hoping you could clarify- did you intend to define the word in general,

>> or

>> just in the context of that specific bill?

>>

>> Thanks so much for your help.

>>

>> Anna

 

 

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