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PMF - Private Military Force CP

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There is always a risk that PMC's commit sex crimes.

 

However, several things should be remembers.

 

A: It's not mutually exclusive to PMC-s peackeepers do it too.

 

B: It's inevitable- PMCs are a permanant part of the military machine.

 

C: The free market solves better than the UN- pmcs are only as good as their last contract.

 

D: If you want, you can read stuff about how the US is already regulating pmcs.

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There is always a risk that PMC's commit sex crimes.

 

However, several things should be remembers.

 

A: It's not mutually exclusive to PMC-s peackeepers do it too.

 

B: It's inevitable- PMCs are a permanant part of the military machine.

 

C: The free market solves better than the UN- pmcs are only as good as their last contract.

 

D: If you want, you can read stuff about how the US is already regulating pmcs.

 

couldn't have said it better

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couldn't have said it better

 

Ya know what's cool? Lions. They establish their dominance and sleep. Sounds good.

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the negative has evidence stating that because PMF's are the ones doing the job, they are much more efficiend and DO NOT comming any type of sexual acts because they live by a stricter military law and on top of that, they further support it with evidence saying that the US has the most powerful and most well trained military forces. The UN is bad because the forces come from all different countries that commit such crimes.

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Sorry, didn't notice that foreign affairs article was only the preview. If someone needs me to, I'll cut the article and post the cards. The only impact that it mentions that isn't repeated in the brookings article (same author) is US military employment drain.

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Like I said, some of the PMC bad ev is damn good - especially on solvency.

 

PMCs suck at PKO's. The UN is best.

 

Gantz 2003

Peter H. Gantz (Peacekeeping Associate with Refugees International; Coordinator of the Partnership for Effective Peace Operations), "The Private Sector’s Role in Peacekeeping and Peace Enforcement," Refugees International, November 18, 2003, http://www.globalpolicy.org/security/peacekpg/training/1118peacekeeping.htm

 

No international regulatory scheme exists to bring the operations of private companies under the authority of international law. At present, either the laws of the nation where the PMC is based or those where the PMC operates must apply. Yet most peace operations take place in failed states, where the absence of the rule of law is a crucial problem, making legal oversight from this source unlikely. As for the home country of the PMC, there is already ample evidence pointing to the difficulty states have monitoring the actions of transnational corporations, whether they provide military services or other services and products. Further, with the profit motive being primary, what is to prevent a private firm from precipitously withdrawing from an operation should it prove to be too complex or dangerous?

Destructive and illegal behavior by company employees is also a risk, just as it has been for troops involved in UN peacekeeping operations. In Bosnia, a private company’s employees were found to be involved in the sexual exploitation of women and children. Is the potential future loss of contracts enough of an incentive for a firm to police its own employees?

In a failed state, the tasks confronting any peace operation are numerous. The restoration of the rule of law goes hand in hand with the need to establish the legitimacy of the state, including ensuring that the control of organized violence rests only with the state. In this context, a private sector role in a peace operation could well be counterproductive. The varied tasks performed by peacekeepers require a set of skills fostered by a culture of peace building, something a private company may not be able to provide.

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It would be pretty easy to bury that card with the thousands of othe cards to say that they rock. We had like 100 pages of PMF solvency in our file. Anyone who has a brain will be briefed out for that kind of thing as well.

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It would be pretty easy to bury that card with the thousands of othe cards to say that they rock. We had like 100 pages of PMF solvency in our file. Anyone who has a brain will be briefed out for that kind of thing as well.

 

Yea, but what are the warranted answers to profit motive, this card says specifically that when they are put in places where geo-political tensions are thick, they can just take the $$$ and either leave, do a half assed job, or say fuck it and kill everything moving.

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We had a card that said that they wanted to do a good job b/c they were intersted in future conflicts. Also, the PMF guys are kind of crazy so they probably don't want a cushy job w/ no conflict. They want to go bust a cap.

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Yea, but what are the warranted answers to profit motive, this card says specifically that when they are put in places where geo-political tensions are thick, they can just take the $$$ and either leave, do a half assed job, or say fuck it and kill everything moving.

 

The argument is not that hard to beat, Butch, and we haven't lost on it this year.

 

1: Any pullout card written by Singer is just wrong- he concludes on the side of privatization good, in the realm of peacekeeing (I have read the new FA article, and still feel this way because our evidence is specific to peacekeeing).

 

2: The negative should be able to easily win a huge risk that the free market prevents corporations from cutting and running- a good public image, and they are only as good as their last contracts.

 

3: PMC's will never pullout

 

A: Don Trautner, head of the Army Logistics Program have challenged people to give a specific instance of when contractors have cut and run (Yeoman in 2003). He argues that they were sent there in an ugly situation- there would be no reason for them to leave when the going gets tough (These people make huge amounts of money)

 

B: It's emperically denied- not a single private contractor has cut and run from Iraq. I don't have the citation for this, but I am more than willing to post it when I get home.

 

Thanks,

Kevin

 

P.S.- If anyone has any questions pertaining to PMCs, find me online. We ran this as an affirmative, and as a PIC on the negative whenever we can.

 

AIM- AFGolfer1987

Email- Progolfer2k2@yahoo.com

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