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jshepard

Weatherman Neg?

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I don't get how this could even be slightly topical. Plus, they will never solve for Africans without access to a radio/TV, etc. And, it is not like weathermen can change the weather.

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I don't get how this could even be slightly topical. Plus, they will never solve for Africans without access to a radio/TV, etc. And, it is not like weathermen can change the weather.

 

It's not that weathermen are changing the weather, they're just calling the aff the weatherman aff. The idea is that they seed clouds to provide clean rainfall and claim the advantages of basically any clean water aff.

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It's not that weathermen are changing the weather, they're just calling the aff the weatherman aff. The idea is that they seed clouds to provide clean rainfall and claim the advantages of basically any clean water aff.

 

FX T...straight up. Even if they win that clean water is topical, their mechanism for reaching it is skewed. This case is more FX T than a reasonable case should be. If the advantages are pretty much the same, run cards off of that. Maybe run a China CP. After all, I hear China is pretty damn good at cloud seeding (I was reading about an article talking about how the government is GUARANTEEING that it will not rain on the opening ceremonies of the summer Olympics). So get a DA that links to US action and try that. As for specific neg, I don't know what to say. Maybe make that part of your T abuse story.

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So get a DA that links to US action and try that. As for specific neg, I don't know what to say. Maybe make that part of your T abuse story.

 

Yeah, the idea of manipulating what you can run to feed t is a very good idea. It allows you to prove the abuse and therefore the voter.

 

Try to find some cloud seeding is ineffective evidence:

for silver iodide seeeding

Silver iodide seeding is usually ineffective in SLW clouds warmer than about -8°C (+18°F)

 

for hygroscopic seeding

Hygroscopic cloud seeding is predicted to be ineffective or of limited effect under very clean continental conditions; therefore, the operational cloud seeding program in Mali should consider employing other seeding methods (AgI seeding at -10 C) during the middle of the rainy season and use hygroscopic seeding when the CCN concentration is higher. Future measurements should determine the CCN concentrations at the start (June) and end (October) of the rain season in Mali.

 

http://books.nap.edu/openbook.php?record_id=10829&page=39 this is a cool book titled "critical issues in weather modification research".

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FX T...straight up. Even if they win that clean water is topical, their mechanism for reaching it is skewed. This case is more FX T than a reasonable case should be. If the advantages are pretty much the same, run cards off of that. Maybe run a China CP. After all, I hear China is pretty damn good at cloud seeding (I was reading about an article talking about how the government is GUARANTEEING that it will not rain on the opening ceremonies of the summer Olympics). So get a DA that links to US action and try that. As for specific neg, I don't know what to say. Maybe make that part of your T abuse story.

 

 

Thanks! I was definitely thinking the same thing on FX T, and I really like the China idea, especially with their recent endeavor with weather control. I think that it may also be plausible to run a Russia CP as the technology that the Chinese are using to control weather for the Olympics was actually developed by the Russians.

 

let me know if you come up with anything else.

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Here's some stuff I think would apply

 

It might be a good idea in the health topicality to add an fx standard and put an independent voter on you. The region I live in doesn't really like fx that much so I don't have it in there.

_______________________________________________________________

 

HEALTH TOPICALITY

 

1.Interpretation - Health is freedom from illness.

Cambridge Dictionaries Online, 2007.

 

the condition of the body and the degree to which it is free from illness, or the state of being well:

 

 

2.Violation: The Affirmative team must increase public health assistance they may provide public assistance but by no means cloud seeding because it doesn't have anything to do with the public's health.

 

 

3.Standards

A.Ground- For a fair debate, division of ground is key. When the affirmative team doesn’t cover an area of the resolution it takes ground away from the negative team leaving us with few arguments to run and the few are extremely weak and hard to win on.

B.Common man – We need to look at this as a common man, our definition is one that the common man would use. We need to use common sense to define health. When the common man is used it makes it much simpler and increases education because we aren't going to use some definition that is only going to be used in this debate round. Common man also wins on this because the common man is the one who should be recieving the health, it won't be viewed as health to the common man with the affirmative's plan.

C.Education – The affirmative destroys the educational value of this debate by focusing on ideas that are not public health we came in here to debate about public health because we want to learn how to fix the health problems in Africa. The affirmative however takes an approach to fix problems in Africa that aren't health related so we don't learn anything in the debate.

 

 

4.Voters

1.Stock Issues- Topicality is a stock issue, if the affirmative team is not topical you can not vote for their case.

 

2.Fairness- The affirmative team took away ground from the negative team thus making this an unfair round, and a judge should never vote on an unfair round.

 

3.Jurisdiction- Judges only have jurisdiction to vote for a topical plan, due to the fact that the affirmatives teams plan is not topical, you can not vote on it.

_______________________________________________________________

 

No Solvency – Need to incorporate both indigenous and new technology

James Kamara, Acting Chief of the Disaster Management Branch of UNEP’s Division of Environmental Policy Implementation 2004 (“Indigenous knowledge in natural disaster reduction in Africa” http://www.environmenttimes.net/article.cfm?pageID=132 accessed 3.25.08)

 

However, despite the prevalent application and use of indigenous knowledge by local communities, it has not been harnessed to fit into the current scientific framework for environmental conservation and natural disaster management in Africa. As a result, there is a general lack of information and understanding of the need to integrate or mainstream indigenous knowledge into scientific knowledge systems for sustainable development in the continent. To achieve this integration would require a blend of approaches and methods from science and technology and from indigenous knowledge.

 

Culture Prevents Optimal Use of Tech

 

Dr. Steven Mizrach, Adjunct Lecturer in the Department of Sociology/Anthropology at Florida International University. 12-2-1998.(“Natives on the Electronic Frontier.” http://www.fiu.edu/~mizrachs/natives-aaa-paper.html accessed 3.26.08)

 

In 1991, author-activist Jerry Mander released In the Absence of the Sacred: the Failure of Technology and the Survival of the Indian Nations. This book continued some of the arguments that Mander originally made in Four Arguments for the Elimination of Television. Mander, like many other popular writers, assumes that technology is somehow antithetical to indigenous peoples, and that the ‘invasive’ spread of technology into their societies is simply the latest manifestation of Western cultural imperialism. Mander somehow feels that technology is just part of the latest onslaught of the Western attack on the cultural survival of these groups. Continuing a long-standing dichotomy in our intellectual tradition, he associates indigenous people with nature, authenticity, and ecological balance, and the Western societies encroaching upon them with artifice, artificiality, and disharmony. One lengthy chapter in the book describes Mander’s lament for the horrific effects of television on indigenous people. Like many other people, Mander sees TV as an instrument for spreading the insidious Western value of consumerism into indigenous communities. Since Indian people do not see themselves (or any representations of themselves with any dignity) on the screen, it helps advance the Western goal of assimilation and acculturation. It causes a decline in sociability, in traditional storytelling, and in family cohesiveness. He cannot possibly see anything positive arise out of the interaction between native people and television, which he sees as absolutely poisonous and inimical to their way of life as ‘firewater’ (alcohol) or disease. But he does not simply reserve his criticism strictly for television: rather, he sees TV, computers, automobiles, and biogenetics as just tentacles of a spreading "megatechnology" which is decreasing the quality of life for all of humanity. For Mander, technology is the absence of the sacred. Apparently, technology is incompatible with the sacred, forcing it to retreat as it advances. The only place where he feels any genuine sacrality remains (which, for him, must always manifest in the form of reverence for nature and the earth) is in the indigenous communities of the Americas and elsewhere - and, like some giant Borg collective, technology is horrifically "eating up" indigenous cultures and assimilating them into a homogenized Western monoculture.

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No Solvency – Need to incorporate both indigenous and new technology

James Kamara, Acting Chief of the Disaster Management Branch of UNEP’s Division of Environmental Policy Implementation 2004 (“Indigenous knowledge in natural disaster reduction in Africa” http://www.environmenttimes.net/article.cfm?pageID=132 accessed 3.25.08)

 

However, despite the prevalent application and use of indigenous knowledge by local communities, it has not been harnessed to fit into the current scientific framework for environmental conservation and natural disaster management in Africa. As a result, there is a general lack of information and understanding of the need to integrate or mainstream indigenous knowledge into scientific knowledge systems for sustainable development in the continent. To achieve this integration would require a blend of approaches and methods from science and technology and from indigenous knowledge.

 

Culture Prevents Optimal Use of Tech

 

Dr. Steven Mizrach, Adjunct Lecturer in the Department of Sociology/Anthropology at Florida International University. 12-2-1998.(“Natives on the Electronic Frontier.” http://www.fiu.edu/~mizrachs/natives-aaa-paper.html accessed 3.26.08)

 

In 1991, author-activist Jerry Mander released In the Absence of the Sacred: the Failure of Technology and the Survival of the Indian Nations. This book continued some of the arguments that Mander originally made in Four Arguments for the Elimination of Television. Mander, like many other popular writers, assumes that technology is somehow antithetical to indigenous peoples, and that the ‘invasive’ spread of technology into their societies is simply the latest manifestation of Western cultural imperialism. Mander somehow feels that technology is just part of the latest onslaught of the Western attack on the cultural survival of these groups. Continuing a long-standing dichotomy in our intellectual tradition, he associates indigenous people with nature, authenticity, and ecological balance, and the Western societies encroaching upon them with artifice, artificiality, and disharmony. One lengthy chapter in the book describes Mander’s lament for the horrific effects of television on indigenous people. Like many other people, Mander sees TV as an instrument for spreading the insidious Western value of consumerism into indigenous communities. Since Indian people do not see themselves (or any representations of themselves with any dignity) on the screen, it helps advance the Western goal of assimilation and acculturation. It causes a decline in sociability, in traditional storytelling, and in family cohesiveness. He cannot possibly see anything positive arise out of the interaction between native people and television, which he sees as absolutely poisonous and inimical to their way of life as ‘firewater’ (alcohol) or disease. But he does not simply reserve his criticism strictly for television: rather, he sees TV, computers, automobiles, and biogenetics as just tentacles of a spreading "megatechnology" which is decreasing the quality of life for all of humanity. For Mander, technology is the absence of the sacred. Apparently, technology is incompatible with the sacred, forcing it to retreat as it advances. The only place where he feels any genuine sacrality remains (which, for him, must always manifest in the form of reverence for nature and the earth) is in the indigenous communities of the Americas and elsewhere - and, like some giant Borg collective, technology is horrifically "eating up" indigenous cultures and assimilating them into a homogenized Western monoculture.

 

I'd answer your solvency takeouts with a non-unique -- South Africa has been seeding for a while now, and its pretty effective.

 

If you are honestly afraid of this aff, I think the defensive arguments are pretty compelling. Seeding is not 100% effective, it requires a lot of technology and research. It isn't like you can just do it any day, you have to seed certain clouds under certain conditions and it takes forever to sit around and wait. The infrastructure is expensive and if they are just paying for it all upfront the long term costs are substantial. Likewise, you can make up some sort of trade-off argument that if they garnish 100% solvency of rain then farmers won't change to drought resistant strains of crops because their status quo crops will work just fine, meaning when global warming finally comes and the "special storms" that the region requires in order for the seeding to work become more and more limited, it will juts be too late.

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I'd answer your solvency takeouts with a non-unique -- South Africa has been seeding for a while now, and its pretty effective.

 

If you are honestly afraid of this aff, I think the defensive arguments are pretty compelling. Seeding is not 100% effective, it requires a lot of technology and research. It isn't like you can just do it any day, you have to seed certain clouds under certain conditions and it takes forever to sit around and wait. The infrastructure is expensive and if they are just paying for it all upfront the long term costs are substantial. Likewise, you can make up some sort of trade-off argument that if they garnish 100% solvency of rain then farmers won't change to drought resistant strains of crops because their status quo crops will work just fine, meaning when global warming finally comes and the "special storms" that the region requires in order for the seeding to work become more and more limited, it will juts be too late.

 

I've been toying with some ideas and I think Shane's idea is the best route to go (ie, fx t, china cp).

 

I've written a China CP Shell and I'm coming up with some wicked nb's, I've just got to write a solid FX T shell (shouldn't be a problem) and come up with some more China good and pull some really good AT Perms and I should be set.

 

Thanks for all the help everyone.

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