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unappreciated... I did my reading, my mistake on the ethanol.

 

Folks suggest that the bast (stalk) of the hemp plant is burned to power boilers, the cellulose is processed for methanol/ethanol, the seeds produce diesel (or in my reading, oxygenated proccesed oil w/ methanol added). but on a kJ-per-acre basis, all parts of the plant must be utilized, and not diverted to your fiber-products advantage ground, otherwise energy independence is not achieved. but on a $-per-acre basis for growers, they'd rather send the stalk for fiber products. The aff just has to reconcile that. (The Great Book of Hemp, Rowan Robinson, 1996)

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Well... solvency is only as ambiguious as it needs to be. I'd never use energy independence as an advantage or solvency criterion. As long as you can substantially increase alternative energy incentives, why should 100% matter?

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unappreciated... I did my reading, my mistake on the ethanol.

 

Folks suggest that the bast (stalk) of the hemp plant is burned to power boilers, the cellulose is processed for methanol/ethanol, the seeds produce diesel (or in my reading, oxygenated proccesed oil w/ methanol added). but on a kJ-per-acre basis, all parts of the plant must be utilized, and not diverted to your fiber-products advantage ground, otherwise energy independence is not achieved. but on a $-per-acre basis for growers, they'd rather send the stalk for fiber products. The aff just has to reconcile that. (The Great Book of Hemp, Rowan Robinson, 1996)

hmmm idk

but the card i read said that, by only using the (leafy) part that it would not impact the amount of KJ per acre because a vast majority of the biofuel ingredient is in the leafy parts

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kool. my bad. but robison is not a comprehensive source on hemp. there are alot of other studies that provide clear ev. that there is a benefit to using hemp as a versatile commodity, because if it's incredible potential for added-value beyond a single industrial aplication. hemp provides two sources of biofuel, and there are hundereds of additional aplications. there are farmers who would like to grow it in the SQ both on marginal land, and as rotation crop. there is plenty of ev on the econ viability of hemp and considering the price of oil, the spike in food and the turmoil food based biofuels has produced, the fact that it decrease input cost for farmers and make it so they don't have to depend on petroleum diesel to run their tractors. Biodiesel made from hemp seed grown on 50 million acres could yield enough biodiesel to offset all of americas farm based diesel consumption and the left over seed-meal can be used as animal feed. additionally farmers would prefer producing biodiesel over ethanol because u don;t need a distillers license to make biodeisel unlike ethanol. and finally hemp fiber goes to specialty clothing and paper markets in the SQ. these are not huge markets they can't absorb all of the supply and with alternative sources of demand make hemp for biofuels completely reasonable.

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you know, I agreed with that the whole time.... remember I LIKE THE AFF. same source also suggested farmers using their own diesel for machinery, which means they don't have to pay either the petrol price or retail price for biodiesel. Yay co-ops.

 

I'm just also not sure if we have 5o mil. acres to go around (a significant amt of hemp cultivation is as a rotation crop, in that case), because farmers get fucking huge subsidies and tax breaks and otherwise goodies for corn ethanol in the squo. Is legalization alone enough incentive to add another production cycle for these farmers, even with the potential gross profit?

 

I think the short answer is yes too, btw. I'm just here to test the aff's watertightness before I run it. So what's the long answer?

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you bring up some decent points, however they're mostly mitigations/defence and i doubt there will be teams who have specific hemp files that make use of these arguments. unless of course there are camp files dedicated to the aff. that said alot of teams will run generic global warming turns (ice age, Co-2 --> food crisis, S0-2 screw), decreased oil dep --> saudi/russian econ collapse.

 

about the amount of land there is evidence that the US has millions of open acres of airable land much more than the 50 million acres.

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After this much banter on cx.com I don't doubt at least 5 camps putting out negs :) Me personally, I HOPE the case debate is important to the topic overall. It would create lotsa education, more than your average impact turn.

 

Meeting US demands requires about 116 mil acres of cultivation out of 422 mil acres of registered cropland. Now, hemp is a 'weed' that can also go on pasture or rangeland... so yeah, it's not wholly relevant, 'cept maybe if it pushes out other industries if the incentive is strong enough.

 

My questions go both ways. I am not contradicting myself, just testing.

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How would you get rid of the rest of the plant that makes the marijuana?

um haven't you read anything about this aff at all o.0?

hemp doesnt contain phycoatics its actually the opposite of marijuana dude

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um haven't you read anything about this aff at all o.0?

hemp doesnt contain phycoatics its actually the opposite of marijuana dude

 

and even if you found some rediculous way that it could produce pot, it's a simple as isolating the male plants from the females and it will prevent germination.

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pots not like almonds or other plants that need male and female germination to produce fruit. the females produce the flowers the male pollen then comes in contact with the female flowers producing seeds. but none of this matters b/c hemp is not pot and pot is not bad anyways. and see the rest of this thread.

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Here, summary of half of the "hemp isn't pot cards" Hemp has a low THC content unlike maryjane. Growing both varieties together means cross pollination and low THC weed and effectively destroys the value of the drug, while the hemp may increase marginally in THC content, there I saved you some work but you can't say we didn't tell you right off.

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pots not like almonds or other plants that need male and female germination to produce fruit. the females produce the flowers the male pollen then comes in contact with the female flowers producing seeds. but none of this matters b/c hemp is not pot and pot is not bad anyways. and see the rest of this thread.

15. Hemp Is The "Anti-Marijuana"

David P. West P.H.D For the North American Industrial Hemp Council

http://www.naihc.org/hemp_informatio...t/hemp.mj.html

 

Hemp is the only plant genus that contains the unique class of molecular compounds called cannabinoids. Many cannabinoids have been identified, but two preponderate: THC, which is the psychoactive ingredient of Cannabis, and CBD, which is an antipsychoactive ingredient. One type of Cannabis is high in the psychoactive cannabinoid, THC, and low in the antipsychoactive cannabinoid, CBD. This type is popularly known as marijuana. Another type is high in CBD and low in THC. Variants of this type are called industrial hemp.The THC levels in industrial hemp are so low that no one could get high from smoking it. Moreover, hemp contains a relatively high percentage of another cannabinoid, CBD, that actually blocks the marijuana high. Hemp, it turns out, is not only not marijuana; it could be called "antimarijuana." According to Professor Pierce, to obtain a psychoactive effect with even 1 percent THC hemp (industrial hemp and feral hemp, the wild hemp the DEA aggressively harvests and burns [28], contain less than 0.5% percent THC [29]), would require the user to smoke 10-12 cigarettes containing hemp in a "very short period of time. . . . This large volume (and) high temperature inhalation of vapor, gas, and smoke would be difficult for a person to withstand, much less enjoy." Professor Pierce goes on to note that anyone who ate hemp hoping to get "high" would be consuming the fiber equivalent of several doses of a high-fiber laxative. In other words, the very unpleasant side effects would dissuade anyone from trying to use industrial hemp as a drug.

 

 

13. AT: Marijuana = Hemp.

Smith-Heisters 2008 (Skaidra Smith-Heisters, is a policy analyst at Reason Foundation, a nonprofit think tank advancing free minds and free markets. a graduate of the University of California at Davis program in Nature and Culture. Prior to joining Reason, she worked in habitat restoration, endangered species management and natural resources planning with the California State Parks system.Illegally Green: Environmental Costs of Hemp Prohibition” Published March 2008 http://www.reason.org/ps367.pdf pg 3)

 

 

Marijuana cultivated for drug value contains between 3 and 10 percent of the active ingredient,

tetrahydrocannabinol or THC. Industrial hemp typically contains 0.3 percent or less of this active ingredient—as a result, it has no value as a drug.

 

 

these were taken directly from the hemp case im making =D

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Hey, so what's the incentive for the affs y'all are cutting separately or together: legalization of cultivation alone or extra subsidies/tax returns?

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Well legalization itself isn't necessarily an incentive, so subsidies or w/e you like is a good idea. I've preempted all the food trade-off disads I could think of with one sentence, tricky little buggers. If I even hear a food trade-off disad in the 1NC with my plan I'm going to go up in the 2AC and call the other team a pair of f***tards. Seriously I hate people who run args that've been preempted because it's a time suck.

Tax returns, are nice but a federal stipend for "x amount" of hemp is also viable, just use what they currently use for corn and make it for hemp.

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15. Hemp Is The "Anti-Marijuana"

David P. West P.H.D For the North American Industrial Hemp Council

http://www.naihc.org/hemp_informatio...t/hemp.mj.html

 

Hemp is the only plant genus that contains the unique class of molecular compounds called cannabinoids. Many cannabinoids have been identified, but two preponderate: THC, which is the psychoactive ingredient of Cannabis, and CBD, which is an antipsychoactive ingredient. One type of Cannabis is high in the psychoactive cannabinoid, THC, and low in the antipsychoactive cannabinoid, CBD. This type is popularly known as marijuana. Another type is high in CBD and low in THC. Variants of this type are called industrial hemp.The THC levels in industrial hemp are so low that no one could get high from smoking it. Moreover, hemp contains a relatively high percentage of another cannabinoid, CBD, that actually blocks the marijuana high. Hemp, it turns out, is not only not marijuana; it could be called "antimarijuana." According to Professor Pierce, to obtain a psychoactive effect with even 1 percent THC hemp (industrial hemp and feral hemp, the wild hemp the DEA aggressively harvests and burns [28], contain less than 0.5% percent THC [29]), would require the user to smoke 10-12 cigarettes containing hemp in a "very short period of time. . . . This large volume (and) high temperature inhalation of vapor, gas, and smoke would be difficult for a person to withstand, much less enjoy." Professor Pierce goes on to note that anyone who ate hemp hoping to get "high" would be consuming the fiber equivalent of several doses of a high-fiber laxative. In other words, the very unpleasant side effects would dissuade anyone from trying to use industrial hemp as a drug.

 

 

13. AT: Marijuana = Hemp.

Smith-Heisters 2008 (Skaidra Smith-Heisters, is a policy analyst at Reason Foundation, a nonprofit think tank advancing free minds and free markets. a graduate of the University of California at Davis program in Nature and Culture. Prior to joining Reason, she worked in habitat restoration, endangered species management and natural resources planning with the California State Parks system.Illegally Green: Environmental Costs of Hemp Prohibition” Published March 2008 http://www.reason.org/ps367.pdf pg 3)

 

 

Marijuana cultivated for drug value contains between 3 and 10 percent of the active ingredient,

tetrahydrocannabinol or THC. Industrial hemp typically contains 0.3 percent or less of this active ingredient—as a result, it has no value as a drug.

 

 

these were taken directly from the hemp case im making =D

 

why is this in response to me. I understand the differnce.

Edited by Bakunin+Debordxhash=Bey

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Pretty sure it was the guy who hasn't been attatched to this thread from the first week or two and didn't read the differences so he reposted his cards.

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Actually I have and marijuana and hemp come from the same plant. And hemp does have some THC in it but it's a very very very small amount. Oh and please do not act like I don't know what I am talking about.

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why is this in response to me. I understand the differnce.

lol my bad i was trying to quote someone else

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