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ldsk

aids in africa decreaing

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that UN/WHO survey concludes that africa is still a big problem that needs a continuation of aid to be completely eliminated. aka, it proves why the plan would succeed by extending empirically successful prevention efforts

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but how can i still get the impacts of the collapse of government? That is the real problem that I am having. thank you for your help

 

I can pretty much bet you any amount of money that HIV is not decreasing enough to promise government stability. At best, you lose a minute portion of the uniqueness for your advantage. That's not nearly enough to make you lose any sleep.

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Despite the recent UNAIDS report AIDS is still a major problem in Sub-Saharan Africa and we still need to act. Their rhetoric is justification for ignoring the lives of over 22 million people.

Richter, ‘7 (Ruthann, staff writer for the San Jose Mercury News, “Despite progress elsewhere, AIDS still ravages sub-Saharan Africa,” http://www.mercurynews.com/opinion/ci_7617305?nclick_check=1)

 

UNAIDS, the joint United Nations program on HIV and AIDS, recently released its revisionist view of the AIDS epidemic, saying the number of people infected is not as great as originally thought. The agency downgraded its estimates by more than 6 million, saying new epidemiologic information suggests that 33.2 million people worldwide now are living with HIV. The large majority - or 68 percent - remain concentrated in sub-Saharan Africa, where more than 76 percent of all AIDS deaths occur. The announcement was a dangerous one, for it carries the risk that the global pandemic - or, more specifically, the African pandemic - will be relegated to the back burner. AIDS may no longer be viewed as a world-wide threat, but rather as a disease that is largely confined to a disempowered population of people who are mostly poor and black. But we should be wary of falling into this trap and succumbing to indifference over the fate of 22.5 million Africans who are living - and dying - with HIV. Rather, we should view this report as a renewed call to action, for it makes it clear that despite all efforts to date, HIV outreach, prevention and treatment services are reaching precious few people in this vulnerable part of the world. According to the Kaiser Family Foundation, HIV testing now reaches only 12 percent of men and 10 percent of women in the high-prevalence countries of sub-Saharan Africa. And antiretroviral drugs - costly medications long taken for granted in this country - are now believed to benefit only about one out of every 10 people in the region who need them to survive.

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Despite the recent UNAIDS report AIDS is still a major problem in Sub-Saharan Africa and we still need to act. Their rhetoric is justification for ignoring the lives of over 22 million people.

Richter, ‘7 (Ruthann, staff writer for the San Jose Mercury News, “Despite progress elsewhere, AIDS still ravages sub-Saharan Africa,” http://www.mercurynews.com/opinion/ci_7617305?nclick_check=1)

 

UNAIDS, the joint United Nations program on HIV and AIDS, recently released its revisionist view of the AIDS epidemic, saying the number of people infected is not as great as originally thought. The agency downgraded its estimates by more than 6 million, saying new epidemiologic information suggests that 33.2 million people worldwide now are living with HIV. The large majority - or 68 percent - remain concentrated in sub-Saharan Africa, where more than 76 percent of all AIDS deaths occur. The announcement was a dangerous one, for it carries the risk that the global pandemic - or, more specifically, the African pandemic - will be relegated to the back burner. AIDS may no longer be viewed as a world-wide threat, but rather as a disease that is largely confined to a disempowered population of people who are mostly poor and black. But we should be wary of falling into this trap and succumbing to indifference over the fate of 22.5 million Africans who are living - and dying - with HIV. Rather, we should view this report as a renewed call to action, for it makes it clear that despite all efforts to date, HIV outreach, prevention and treatment services are reaching precious few people in this vulnerable part of the world. According to the Kaiser Family Foundation, HIV testing now reaches only 12 percent of men and 10 percent of women in the high-prevalence countries of sub-Saharan Africa. And antiretroviral drugs - costly medications long taken for granted in this country - are now believed to benefit only about one out of every 10 people in the region who need them to survive.

 

Good card. But still, his question is corruption/gov't stability specific.

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