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U.S. Health Policy Modelled Globally

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Has anyone come across any articles or cards in camp files indicating that other countries model public health initiatives implemented by the US?

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Doubt you're looking for a card like this but maybe the author wrote more about the US specifically

 

Stacey Knobler et al, program officer at the Institute of Medicine and former research fellow at Brookings, 2006 (http://www.nap.edu/openbook.php?record_id=11588&page=113)

Whatever action is taken in sub-Saharan Africa will have historic consequences; indeed, it will shape the world of the twenty-first century. If the approach used in sub-Saharan Africa is successful, it could be extended to other regions, with broad economic and political consequences around the world. If it is unsuccessful, the AIDS epidemic will continue to widen the health and economic gaps between the developed and developing worlds and exacerbate the growing political instability in Africa and beyond.

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Benatar and Fox '05 – Professor of Medicine and Bioethics @ University of Cape Town and Professor of Sociology and Bioethics @ University of Pennsylvania [solomon R. Benatar and Renée C. Fox, “Meeting Threats to Global Health: A call for American leadership,” Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 48.3 (2005) 344-361//Project Muse]edlee

 

There is a "back to the future" irony in the fact that the eruption and spread of a multitude of "old" and "new" infectious diseases has become the most serious global threat to the health of humankind (Benatar 2001a; Garrett 1994). The current epidemics of infectious diseases—including the "white plague" of tuberculosis that was supposed to have yielded to the powers of antibiotics—take their greatest toll on populations of so-called developing countries, and also among disadvantaged groups in privileged "developed" societies (Benatar 2001b; Gandy and Zumla 2003). The recent epidemic of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS; Lee et al. 2003) is a small-scale example of the new, acute, rapidly fatal infectious diseases that may, like the 1918–1919 flu epidemic, sweep through the world with high mortality rates in all countries, with accompanying profound social and economic implications. This paper, by a South African physician and an American medical sociologist, considers challenges that face global health, health care professionals, and governments at the beginning of the 21st century. Our reflections rest on three major premises: that global health problems pose major medical, social, and economic threats to all countries; that it is in the long-term self-interest of wealthy nations to address the forces that significantly affect the health of whole populations; and that at this historical juncture, the United States is the country with the most potential for favorably influencing global health trends. In addition to discussing the nature of threats to global health, we explore some of the major impediments to efforts that could be undertaken to foster alterations in policies that would effectively address the tragic discrepancies in health care and research that currently exist, and to overcome global apathy to the HIV/AIDS pandemic (Hogg et al. 2002). These obstacles involve a confluence of important American values, exemplified by political ideologies that have global as well as national health import; the prevailing ethos of bioethics in the United States; and the current views of many other countries towards the international policies and actions of the United States. As sociologist Robert N. Bellah (2002) has provocatively stated, in and through the "relentless" process of globalization, the United States has become a "cultural model and economic dynamo" as well as a military superpower, and more "by default" than by intention, a country with "imperial power." In our view, because of its singularity in these respects (for better or for worse), the United States not only has the scientific, political, and economic capacity to assume major responsibility for improving world health, but also the moral obligation to exemplify and implement values in action that are conducive to this advancement. We make this statement with two caveats. First, we are wary about [End Page 345] unduly promoting the dominance of American influence in the world by encouraging its moral hegemony in global health. Second, as noted above, we are mindful of the cultural and political factors that curtail the readiness and willingness of the United States to assume such a leadership role, and that contribute to health inequities in the American health care system that call for reform rather than emulation. We believe, however, that these caveats should be superseded by the moral imperative of facing up to national and global threats posed by disparities in health and emerging epidemics. Moreover, we believe that the long-term interests of Americans, and indeed of all privileged people and their societies, will be served by major improvements in global health (Benatar 2003).

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Has anyone come across any articles or cards in camp files indicating that other countries model public health initiatives implemented by the US?

 

 

i think that you should be looking for evidence on this issue that is specific to your aff. ie- i know there are cards about why if the US sprays DDT in SSA, other countries will start too also.

 

im pertty sure the same goes for other affs. one thing i am positive of is that generic modeling cards are not the way to roll because the warrants are simply generic and not too great

 

maybe ask about your aff specifialy?

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