Jump to content
scottj

Kierkegaard Aff

Recommended Posts

Would it be possible, or even a good idea to write a Affirmative following the philosophy of Kierkegaard? It would be something like this.

 

Kierkegaard says that to have meaning in your life, you have to make the movement to higher immediacy. You have to make a unconditional commitment, which basially defines who you are and gives you your identity. Since the commitment has to be temporal and finite, the plan would encompass fighting for the rights of ethnic minority groups in Sudan and stopping the genocide they are being faced with. We, in the round, move to stop the genocide, and make the move to be knights of resignation, in which we eternalize the memory. "Eternity is only possible in time", which means the memory we hold from this relationship sticks with us forever, and sets the paradigm that allows us to stop genocide in any other future occurences. So the plan allows us in the round to experience "joyful sorrow" by becoming knights of resignation and gives meaning to our lives, but also allows us to alleviate the suffering.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

plan text would be something like the affirmative team will commit to fight for rights of ethnic groups in Sudan? that doesn't seem topical at all and seems like if you want to garner some sort of advantage off of becoming knights of resignation you could just as easily do that by advocating the united states federal government do the plan (if the literature exists).

 

If you were doing this as a critical affirmative it seems as if there would be some major solvency and impact issues because you would have to prove how actual in-round action (unconditionally committing to the plight of Sundanese or something) would help them at all.

 

It seems as if we should just go ahead and pretend like the United States will do something if you're going to run this type of argument.

 

Plus you would get hit by borders and Deleuze all day long until it bled.

  • Upvote 2
  • Downvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
plan text would be something like the affirmative team will commit to fight for rights of ethnic groups in Sudan? that doesn't seem topical at all and seems like if you want to garner some sort of advantage off of becoming knights of resignation you could just as easily do that by advocating the united states federal government do the plan (if the literature exists).

 

I would consider genocide to be detrimental to public health. I think the affirmative acts as an advocacy and a commitment to stop genocide.

 

If you were doing this as a critical affirmative it seems as if there would be some major solvency and impact issues because you would have to prove how actual in-round action (unconditionally committing to the plight of Sundanese or something) would help them at all.

 

I think that is a good debate, and I think that it can be won. Individual action = K to change

 

Plus you would get hit by borders and Deleuze all day long until it bled.

 

That is to be expected.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

hmmm... sure, i get the aff, but my question is, "is the ev there?"

 

cuz i know from some experience that kierkegaard is hard to cut and that perhaps links to the genocide in sudan would be hard to find.

  • Upvote 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Would it be possible, or even a good idea to write a Affirmative following the philosophy of Kierkegaard? It would be something like this.

 

Kierkegaard says that to have meaning in your life, you have to make the movement to higher immediacy. You have to make a unconditional commitment, which basially defines who you are and gives you your identity. Since the commitment has to be temporal and finite, the plan would encompass fighting for the rights of ethnic minority groups in Sudan and stopping the genocide they are being faced with. We, in the round, move to stop the genocide, and make the move to be knights of resignation, in which we eternalize the memory. "Eternity is only possible in time", which means the memory we hold from this relationship sticks with us forever, and sets the paradigm that allows us to stop genocide in any other future occurences. So the plan allows us in the round to experience "joyful sorrow" by becoming knights of resignation and gives meaning to our lives, but also allows us to alleviate the suffering.

 

I like the idea. What works of Kierkegaard's would you be using?

  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

×
×
  • Create New...