Jump to content
JHCP

[AFF] Blood Diamonds

Recommended Posts

Would anyone like to help me write A blood diamonds Cases for next years resolution

 

I know one advantage is going to be Amputation

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Blood diamonds producers are ignoring and exploiting the Kimberly process.

Ian Smillie, 2006, Partnership Afrcian Canada, (A research coordinator for PAC, http://blooddiamond.pacweb.org/kimberlyprocess/)

 

In a speech on the opening day of the November 2006 KP Plenary, PAC Research Coordinator, Ian Smillie, said, “we meet at a moment of great importance for the Kimberley Process, the diamond industry, and the people whose lives depend not just on a prosperous diamond industry, but one that cannot be used the threaten peace. In the past 18 months, we have seen more and more examples of how criminals and diamond dealers and smugglers and even governments have been able to bypass, subvert and ignore the KPCS with almost complete impunity.

 

He spoke of the PAC investigations in Brazil and Guyana, and the about the UN report on conflict diamonds from Côte d’Ivoire. He reported on what PAC had found recently in Venezuela, where all of the country’s diamonds are being illegally exported without any reference to the Kimberley Process.

 

He said that “When the subject of internal controls came up during the three year review discussions, the best we could produce was a new compendium of ‘guidance’. There is not a single new requirement, not a recommendation as far as I know, that would make the slightest difference to the way things have been managed over the past three years.

 

"In fact we have spent six months in the ad hoc review committee bickering over this recommendation and that. Six months during which we have had ample proof that while the system can work, it is not working; six months during which we could have exercised authority, but did not; six months during which we could have demonstrated to the industry, governments, consumers and Hollywood that the KPCS is seriously concerned about rampant and obvious smuggling, criminality and conflict diamonds. But we did not.”

 

And, he added, “A body which represent more than 70 governments, which represents the interests of a $60 billion industry, and which aims to halt and prevent the scourge of conflict diamonds, finds contemplation of any sort of common pool for cost sharing so odious, so ‘unrealistic’, that it brings discussions where the idea arises almost to the breaking point.”Smillie said that the Kimberley Process was at a turning point. “There is a fork in the road ahead,” he said. “In one direction lies the Kimberley Process we have talked about, the ‘remarkably successful’ mechanism that has brought more than 70 countries, civil society and industry together in a combined effort to protect lives and livelihoods. In the other direction lies a talk shop, an increasingly bureaucratic and self-deluding operation that masks the reality of what is actually happening, and which will – if it does not collapse in on itself – do nothing to prevent the recurrence of conflict diamonds.

 

U.S. key to stopping proliferation of blood diamonds.

Emad Mekay 09/10/2006, Inter Press News Service (http://www.commondreams.org/headlines06/1010-08.htm)

 

The United States, the world's largest consumer of diamonds, should adopt stronger oversight measures to choke off a trade that fuels wars and human rights abuses in many exporting nations, a U.S. Congressional report finds.

 

The Government Accountability Office (GAO), the watchdog arm of the U.S. Congress, acknowledges in a new report that the United States has enhanced the quality of its rough diamond trade data by improving its collection processes, but says that "work remains to be done".

 

The international diamond industry has built up a bad reputation in Africa by funding militants, rebel activities and civil wars in the poor continent in its pursuit of gems.

 

In the United States, the Departments of State, Treasury, Homeland Security and Commerce, and the U.S. Kimberley Process Authority (USKPA), a private entity run by U.S. diamond trade groups that issues rough diamond certificates, have all been responsible for controlling U.S. imports and exports of rough diamonds.

 

But the 68-page report says that the United States lacks an effective system for confirming receipt of imports -- a Kimberley Process requirement for avoiding possible diversions of rough diamond imports.

 

Washington is aiding some countries known for trading in conflict diamonds such as Sierra Leone and Liberia in their efforts to comply global rules, but the process remains severally constrained by the limited capacity and resources of these countries, the report says.

 

The study recommends that several U.S. departments carry out more accurate reporting of the U.S. rough diamond trade. It specifically calls for physical inspections and confirmation of rough diamond import receipts with foreign exporting authorities.

 

"Given that the U.S. is the world's largest consumer of diamond jewelry, the U.S. government must take a leadership role by making sure that its own laws are robust in keeping out conflict diamonds, supporting the Kimberley Process and protecting the legitimate diamond trade," said Ian Smillie of Partnership Africa Canada.

 

Blood diamond warfare dehumanizes entire populations and causes massive loss of life.

Rory Anderson 8/10/2001 World Vision United States

Anderson is a Government Relations Manager, as well as an Africa Policy Specialist for World Vision

(http://www.worldvision.org/world vision/wvususfo.nsf/stable/globalissues_conflictdiamonds_testimony)

 

For every conflict diamond sold, there is a corresponding humanitarian crisis. In Angola, the 1990s proved to be the most violent decade and the worst in terms of humanitarian suffering. By November 1999, 3.7 million, one third of the entire population, were classified by the UN as “war affected”, defined as “those who depend on emergency humanitarian assistance due to war and the resultant loss of assets and earning opportunities.” UN Consolidated Appeal for Angola for Jan-Dec 2000, November 1999 Of the 3.7 million, 2.5 million are internally displaced, 65% of whom are children under the age of fourteen, causing UNICEF to declare Angola “the worst place for a child to grow up.” The denial of basic rights to food, education and health, coupled with an estimated 6-15 million landmines littered throughout the country, claim the lives of 30% of Angola’s children before they reach the age of five. Ibid., p.17. In their August 2001 report, the UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs identified all seventeen Angolan provinces as being insecure and inaccessible because of diamond extraction, mine infestation, and sustained violence.

 

Ranked last on the UN Human Development Index, the war in Sierra Leone has exacted a heavy humanitarian toll on the population. An estimated 70,000 people have been killed since the war started in 1991. Approximately 5,000 were killed in and around Freetown in the January 1999 rebel offensive against the capital. Civilian and child amputations have been a trademark atrocity, with estimates of 1,800 amputees. Currently, almost 1 million Sierra Leonians are internally displaced, in addition to the 470,000 refugees who have fled to neighboring Guinea and Liberia. 30% of Sierra Leone’s population of 4.6 million have been uprooted because of this conflict. Humanitarian response continues to be hampered by the issue of access to war-affected populations trapped in the northern and eastern parts of the country. 55% of the population live in conflict affected areas and are inaccessible by humanitarian aid.

 

Within the current deliberations on conflict diamonds there have been fewer references to the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), yet diamonds from this area are equally problematic. Several warring factions, including the rebel government and multiple international armed forces who all desire access to the DRC’s mineral resources, have wrecked a humanitarian crisis that is quickly outpacing the enormity of the Sudan. This factor, coupled with gross human rights abuses committed among all factions, I believe, warrants the label of conflict diamond for any stone originating from the DRC. In the DRC, it has been found that since August 1998 there has been at least 1.7 million deaths in war-affected areas over and above the 600,000 that would normally be expected. The overwhelming majority of these additional deaths are attributable to preventable diseases and malnutrition –– a tragic consequence of a health care system destroyed by war. On average, some 2,600 people are dying every day, and further research is finding that the first months of the year 2000 were even worse than 1999. Thirty four percent of these deaths have been children under the age of five (over 590,000), and 47% of all violent, war-related deaths are women and children. The highest death rates are among populations displaced by the fighting, and civilians continue to be targeted by all sides in the conflict. As one NGO leader has explained this: “The loss of life in the Congo has been staggering, It’s as if the entire population of Houston was wiped off the face of the earth in a matter of months.”

 

Blood diamonds fund terrorism and organized crime and fuel violence.

Rory Anderson 8/10/2001 World Vision United States

Anderson is a Government Relations Manager, as well as an Africa Policy Specialist for World Vision

(http://www.worldvision.org/world vision/wvususfo.nsf/stable/globalissues_conflictdiamonds_testimony)

 

 

In the wake of the September 11 terrorist attacks, there has been a necessary increased public attention to terrorism. However, terrorism is not a phenomenon that is only rooted in extremist Islamic fundamentalism; terrorism—which is planned, systematic violent attacks against unarmed, non-combatant civilians—has been a central platform to the wars in Sierra Leone, Angola, and the DRC. Terrorism has become a conventional weapon in 21st century warfare, making war more brutal and more costly. Although terrorism has become a conventional method, it is mostly sustained through underground networks of money laundering and weapons smuggling. As an internationally valued commodity, diamonds have become the dollar, particularly in Sierra Leone. Because diamonds can move so easily and quickly, a dealer can buy low, sell high and reap windfall profits, particularly during the height of a war. For the seemingly intractable war in Sierra Leone, the point of the war may not be to actually win it, but to engage in profitable crime under the cover of warfare. Over the years, the informal diamond mining sector, long dominated by what might be called “disorganized crime”, has now become increasingly influenced by organized crime and by the transcontinental smuggling of diamonds, guns, drugs, and vast sums of money in search of a laundry. Each of these smuggled items has become critical components to warfare, and thus, violence becomes central to the advancement of those with vested interests.

 

Al Qaeda, Hezbollah, other terrorist groups sell blood diamonds for money.

Lucy Jones 2/20/03 BBC News Online (http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/africa/2775763.stm)

 

New details are emerging of links between al-Qaeda and the illicit trade in so-called "blood diamonds" bought from rebel groups in Africa.

 

The vast sums of money and weapons exchanged in return for the gems have helped fuel some of the bloodiest civil wars in Africa.

 

At the time of the 1998 bombings of the United States embassies in Kenya and Tanzania, al-Qaeda allegedly transferred cash into high-value commodities, including diamonds.

 

Several members of al-Qaeda's inner circle bought gems in Liberia and from Revolutionary United Front (RUF) rebels in Sierra Leone, according to research first published by the Washington Post

 

The move into diamonds came as al-Qaeda's assets were frozen.

 

Much of the evidence comes from Western intelligence reports and from the trials of al-Qaeda suspects after the 11 September attacks and the bombings of US embassies in East Africa.

 

"Diamonds are an extremely highly concentrated form of wealth and they retain their value," said Alex Yearsley from the campaign group Global Witness.

 

Al-Qaeda also bought diamonds as well as gemstones in Tanzania, he said. Global Witness has estimated that al-Qaeda laundered $20m through purchasing diamonds.

 

Facing financial difficulties in 1993 following the establishment of operations in Sudan, the organization is said to have bought and sold gems to raise funds.

 

Many of the diamonds were mined by the RUF rebels, whose trademark during Sierra Leone's civil war was to hack off the hands of their victims.

 

Payment for the diamonds - which are the subject of United Nations sanctions designed to prevent their trade from fuelling civil war - was made in cash or weapons.

 

Other groups have used African "conflict diamonds" to fund their operations.

 

"Hezbollah (a Shiite Muslim organisation linked to Lebanese activists) fundraised through diamonds. They used the Lebanese diaspora in Western and Central Africa. Israel tried to shut down networks in Sierra Leone," said Mr Yearsley.

 

"[Liberia's President] Charles Taylor used a lot of diamonds to create a lot of mayhem."

 

(insert favorite terrorism impact here)

 

I'll get a few more cards to you that specifically deal with BD's health effects tommorow.

 

I considered blood diamonds as well and beyond this I probably won't be of much more help as I looked into it fairly hard and found damning flaws in the case.

 

The Good:

Rediculously sweet adv. potential

It's a very SSA centric issue

There's a lot of lit on it

 

But... the Bad:

the Kimberly process and other initiatives have been extremely, extremely (I can't emphasize this enough), effective in shutting down the blood diamond trade. Less than 1% of diamonds are blood diamonds.

Has T problems with 'public health assistance' and 'substantial'

Not alot of great solvency mechs.

Has extra T problems

Has agent CP problems as far as solvency goes

You'd probably need military force to stop blood diamond trade to a point where you can access any advantages, bringing in all those wonderful military links and impacts to dozens of Kritiks in addition to the standard links, and this opens up a bunch of military based DA's as well.

Or if you don't use the military, Blood diamond trade is hard to stop, it's like a 'stop theft' case. I doubt the U.S. can stop BD trade without force. It'd be like stopping crime without police.

In general the neg lit will kick your ass, it won't be stuff like blood diamonds good (though I'm sure an economic collapse could be spun out of it), but stuff like 'revitalizes diamond wars', 'pisses off rebel groups', 'ignores more important issues + defense on solvency'.

 

So... yeah. Good luck though, hope you have more sucess than I did.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was thinking about like Helping the victims of Amputations of the Sierra Leone civil war

 

Because

1) A major Part of their country has amputation on 1 or more parts of their bodies

2) By sending ___________ whatever my solvency mechism is over there

to help amputee's Increase soft power and leds to less Anti-Americanism Aboard

 

The other advantages will probably Critical

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Blood diamonds certainly is a problem area in Afirca that needs to be addressed, but for the resolution next year it has a hard time meeting the resolution for "health assistance." Blood diamonds don't cause disease or deteriorated health, but instead are the root of conflict, money laundering, political meddling, etc. You would probably lose out on the topicality debate. Even if you do get access to the public health through blood diamonds, any advatange based off stopping conflicts and stuff is extra topical, and the public health aspect of the affirmative would be minimal at best. The negative has good topicality standard arguments on ground loss (blood diamonds is killer cp ground) and predictability (the literature about blood diamonds relating to public health is minimal).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know the Blood Diamonds affirmative is a loser before the season even started

  • Downvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

http://allafrica.com/stories/200704300895.html

 

Liberia: UN Lifts Sanction On Diamond

 

April 30, 2007

Posted to the web April 30, 2007

 

The United Nations Security Council has voted to lift a 2001 ban on the export of diamonds from Liberia, according to the BBC. The ban was meant to stop proceeds from the sale of so-called "blood diamonds" fuelling wars in West African nations. The BBC Correspondents say the UN decided Liberia has made enough progress, but that it must certify diamonds for sale do not originate from conflict zones. Two years ago Liberia elected its first democratic leader, Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf, since its civil war. The 15-nation Security Council unanimously passed the resolution, including a provision to review the decision after 90 days, council president, British ambassador Emyr Jones Parry, said. Nearly half of the world's diamonds come from west, central and southern Africa. But the lucrative trade fuelled conflicts in countries such as Angola, Congo, Sierra Leone and Liberia, as rebel groups fought for control of diamonds and found willing international buyers to finance their activities. Mrs. Johnson-Sirleaf had pressed for the ban to be lifted, arguing that funds were desperately needed to improve living standards in Liberia. Unemployment is at 85% in the West African nation, and this is a chance to create much needed jobs and reinvigorate the country's economy, says the BBC's Laura Trevelyan at the UN. Liberia must now sign up to the Kimberley Process, the UN says, to ensure it does not revert to exporting conflict diamonds. The international diamond certification scheme, established in May 2000, tracks the origin of diamonds on the international market. This is the council's second vote of confidence in Mrs. Johnson-Sirleaf's presidency. In June it lifted an embargo on Liberian wood. Mrs. Johnson-Sirleaf, who took office in January 2006, was the first woman to be elected president of an African country.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The only way this case will topical is if you help out all the people who got parts of their bodies amputated in Thee republic of Sierra Leone and then going the rest K

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So what's your plan text going to be? How exactly are you giving them health assistance?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Amputees are not the only way to run this case, you can also use the abysmal mining conditions in Africa.

This card is specific to Debeer's diamond mines yes, but I would think that even Debeers which came under serious fire for it's own diamond mining practices, has at least better ventilation and safety than the rebel groups that use enslaved miners right?

Diamond mining causes huge spikes of tuberculosis in it’s miners.

Janine Roberts 11/20/06, Mines and Communities, (http://www.minesandcommunities.org/Action/press1307.htm)

 

Some years ago I was told by a shop steward at Finsch, a giant De Beers mine in South Africa; “The diamonds we mine are sitting in asbestos. We are ill protected with inadequate masks. The ventilation is always breaking down. We are frequently covered in asbestos dust.” But at the time I found De Beers’ doctors kept a tight hold on the miners’ health records, so I could not verify this most serious allegation.

Most mineworkers only get diagnosed with TB when it is too late, within a few months of their death, so they get no treatment at all. Many are not diagnosed even then, Their TB is only discovered at autopsy.”

He told me that TB mostly starts in mineworkers after sharp particles from recently broken silica have severely damaged both their lungs and immune systems. Our immune system will try to remove any silica that gains entry to the lungs – and at low levels of dust it often succeeds.

The victims of silicosis will face years of night sweats and chills, violent bloody fits of coughing, and the possible spread of infections to other parts of their bodies. Autopsies have revealed virtual sand beds in mineworkers’ lungs.

How common are these bacteria?” I then asked. His answer was shocking: “By the time they are twenty years old, 100% of all South Africans have been exposed to TB.” But this did not mean they would all get the illness called TB. I learnt that TB is a rod-like bacterium that is normally harmless. It becomes dangerous to mineworkers mostly after mine dust has done its damage, when “the bacteria can multiply in the wounds the dust creates, gain immunity to drugs, and is very difficult to kill.

This made me wonder what did most of the damage, the bacteria or the dust. I thus ask: “What is the clinical difference in patients between silicosis (in which no germ is involved) and TB?” He answered; “Very little. Except, there is more weight loss in TB.”

Freshly broken silica spilled out by drill bits is especially good at cutting into the lung cells. But sharp silica dust is not only in mines – it is in a wide range of industries and in many environments. However it is rarely as thick as in mine dust.

When I asked Professor Davies; “How common is TB in South Africa?” He replied: “Extremely” and explained emphatically how the other great epidemic, AIDS, “is masking” the true size of the TB “catastrophe.” His research revealed that silicosis/TB has been killing mineworkers from well before AIDS; that most mine drillers in Cornwall and the Transvaal were dying in 1902 of mine dust or TB before they reached their 37th birthday.[v]

The danger had not gone away. He angrily told me: “We have 1000% more TB cases than the USA. It has 4 cases of TB per 100,000. We have 500 cases per 100,000 – minimum – probably more like 750 new cases per 100,000 every year.

I check the latest South African governmental health statistics, those for 2001. These list TB as the biggest killer, followed by pneumonia and then AIDS. The AIDS figures are not broken down into the “opportunistic infections” but TB is also by far the biggest killer in AIDS cases. TB is characterized by weight loss, as is AIDS. Silicosis also destroys immune cells. The end result is the same.

Two hundred retired diamond mineworkers from the De Beers Premier mine were tested – and every single one of them had clinical asbestosis.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good luck with your solvency. The only effective plan text would be:

 

The USFG should invade SSA and steal all the blood diamonds.

 

Because there's too much money in the diamond trade to solve for anything.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How about just a critical aff with the plan text being a notion:

 

The United States government will establish a policy in support of the regulation and abolition of blood diamond trade.

 

And with this simple notion we are already saying that we support Africans and that we want to assist their health.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I need to learn how to write a critical affirmative if this aff is ever going to be cut

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll say again what I've said before. No solvency. And, assuming you do get any solvency...

 

Turn: The plan makes the blood diamond crisis worse by taking diamonds out of the market, upping the demand and worsening violence.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The USFG doesn't do anything to actually "remove" them from the market. What it does it offers a policy to help the people of Sierra Leone and to regulate the blood diamond trade. The solvency is critical, therefor linear. We as a nation do not have the constitutional right to infringe on other countries but we can (an example is the Truman Doctrine, and then the Marshall Plan which specifically required the country to ask for help) so all we can do is establish this "doctrine" as a notion to assist African health.

 

And the turn might be pretty good, except that I can always extend impact of terrorism and genocide. How much of the diamond market is actually blood diamonds?

  • Downvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The USFG doesn't do anything to actually "remove" them from the market. What it does it offers a policy to help the people of Sierra Leone and to regulate the blood diamond trade. The solvency is critical, therefor linear. We as a nation do not have the constitutional right to infringe on other countries but we can (an example is the Truman Doctrine, and then the Marshall Plan which specifically required the country to ask for help) so all we can do is establish this "doctrine" as a notion to assist African health.

 

And the turn might be pretty good, except that I can always extend impact of terrorism and genocide. How much of the diamond market is actually blood diamonds?

 

Your answers to the turn are non-responsive. Doing anything to regulate the blood diamond trade worsens the situation. Simply extending your mpx only puts you in a deeper hole, because you cause them to be worse.

 

Also, you're extra-T. The USFG isn't doing the increasing, and you don't prove an increase. Go ahead and try to K the T, but it's still the number one thing in the round if I win framework (which most judges have a tendancy to lean towards policy-making if it's argued well).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Your answers to the turn are non-responsive. Doing anything to regulate the blood diamond trade worsens the situation. Simply extending your mpx only puts you in a deeper hole, because you cause them to be worse.

 

Also, you're extra-T. The USFG isn't doing the increasing, and you don't prove an increase. Go ahead and try to K the T, but it's still the number one thing in the round if I win framework (which most judges have a tendancy to lean towards policy-making if it's argued well).

 

 

How would this work in a novice round if K wasn't run by the neg?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

×
×
  • Create New...